Vhs to dvd

vbimport

#1

I am wanting to transfer, and hopefully restore some old vhs home movies of my late husband for my family and children. They were recorded in the '90’s, and are are faded and discolored. Because these movies are irreplaceable, i need some advice on the best way to do this, without losing further picture quality. Any advice would be greatly appreciated! There are so many different products out there, Im confused!


#2

I think the easiest method & will probably have the same quality as the VHS tapes you have.
You need either a combo standalone unit ( one that dubs VHS to DVD ) or
A standalone DVD recorder/player that you connect your VHS player to.

There are methods that [B]may[/B] improve quality . They are more involved & the improvement may be only slightly better . This will require better hardware like a SVHS player . This would connect to your computer sound & audio card inputs .

I don’t have a specific software to recommend for capturing & converting the input.
What I used when I did this was adequate but did not improve the quality.
I also don’t have a SVHS player.
There used to be & may still be hardware for connecting the VHS player to that adjusts the output & could improve the output quailty . I have never had this so I can’t say if it does any good.
In the long run it depends on how much you want to spend .
Compare that to what a professional service that does this would cost.


#3

Thanks so much so the helpful information!

[QUOTE=cholla;2677549]I think the easiest method & will probably have the same quality as the VHS tapes you have.
You need either a combo standalone unit ( one that dubs VHS to DVD ) or
A standalone DVD recorder/player that you connect your VHS player to.

There are methods that [B]may[/B] improve quality . They are more involved & the improvement may be only slightly better . This will require better hardware like a SVHS player . This would connect to your computer sound & audio card inputs .

I don’t have a specific software to recommend for capturing & converting the input.
What I used when I did this was adequate but did not improve the quality.
I also don’t have a SVHS player.
There used to be & may still be hardware for connecting the VHS player to that adjusts the output & could improve the output quailty . I have never had this so I can’t say if it does any good.
In the long run it depends on how much you want to spend .
Compare that to what a professional service that does this would cost.[/QUOTE]


#4

If you need to adjust brightness, color or remove noise, this is best done before converting to dvd-video format. To do this, you would need a capture device for your computer that lets you take the video from the VHS player and put it into an avi container file using a lossless codec like huffyUV.

That part is fairly straightforward, though it takes equipment with that capability. A high quality SVHS player is also helpful.

Once on the computer, things get more complicated, as there are many different ways to apply filters, and many different programs for this process. Any good video editor should let you apply filters and preview the effects. There are even a few free ones, like Virtualdub and AviDemux, but there are also many commercial products like Adobe Premiere Elements and Sony Vegas Movie Studio.

Capturing and applying filters isn’t exactly what I would recommend as a beginner’s project. You might want to contact a professional service and see what they would charge.


#5

Thank you so much for the helpful info.

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2677565]If you need to adjust brightness, color or remove noise, this is best done before converting to dvd-video format. To do this, you would need a capture device for your computer that lets you take the video from the VHS player and put it into an avi container file using a lossless codec like huffyUV.

That part is fairly straightforward, though it takes equipment with that capability. A high quality SVHS player is also helpful.

Once on the computer, things get more complicated, as there are many different ways to apply filters, and many different programs for this process. Any good video editor should let you apply filters and preview the effects. There are even a few free ones, like Virtualdub and AviDemux, but there are also many commercial products like Adobe Premiere Elements and Sony Vegas Movie Studio.

Capturing and applying filters isn’t exactly what I would recommend as a beginner’s project. You might want to contact a professional service and see what they would charge.[/QUOTE]


#6

Transferring VHS is an art and like most arts requires practice. You may get the best results by farming the job out, especially if you can find a local facility who can show you samples of their work. The best way to correct a video is while it is still in the analog realm using ‘Proc Amps’ and ‘Time Base Correction’ along with professional or industrial tape decks. This kind of equipment can be expensive and is getting rarer by the day.