VHS/DVD recorder

vbimport

#1

Does anybody out there know of a VHS/DVD Recorder that has flexible recording outside of Panasonic. I have looked everywhere and have yet to come up with a one.
My son started me off with a Panasonic and I love all it’s features - but one.
They break done very quickly. I have gone through three machines, I’m on my fourth, in 30 months and I definitely need to find a better product. I do hate to give up the flexible recording feature!


#2

[QUOTE=Tuppenny;2565119]Does anybody out there know of a VHS/DVD Recorder that has flexible recording outside of Panasonic. I have looked everywhere and have yet to come up with a one.
My son started me off with a Panasonic and I love all it’s features - but one.
They break done very quickly. I have gone through three machines, I’m on my fourth, in 30 months and I definitely need to find a better product. I do hate to give up the flexible recording feature![/QUOTE]

I own more than twenty Panasonic DVD recorders of the 2005 through 2009 model years.

The most common cause of a Panasonic “breakdown” is a dirty rubber hub atop the spindle (turntable) in the DVD Drive. Several posts in this MyCe thread have advice, cautions and photos:

This single AVS post draws together that advice and related matters, including cautions and photos:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=14479898#post14479898

Panasonic’s best VHS/DVD combo recorders were the 2005 DMR-ES30V and the 2006 DMR-ES35V, DMR-ES45V and DMR-ES46V models. Owners of these outstanding full-featured combo recorders should give these recorders regular servicing to keep them in service. The 2005 DMR-ES40 is of limited functionality and has several design flaws and bugs. With my 2005 and 2006 model year Panasonics I dubbed to DVD more than 5,200 videotaped titles over a ten month period in 2007.

The 2007 through 2010 EZ series VHS/DVD combo recorder models (DMR-EZ37, DMR-EZ47, DMR-EZ475, DMR-EZ48 and DMR-EZ485) have limited functionality and uncorrected design flaws and bugs.

If I were to consider a dubbing project with current model products I would not use any brand of VHS/DVD combo recorder for that project.

A good method to copy VHS tapes to DVD is to connect a VCR to a DVD recorder and record through a line input.

The best method to copy VHS tapes is to connect a VCR to a Magnavox HDD/DVD recorder, copy the material through a line input to the hard drive, edit/divide the material if you wish and high-speed the material to DVDs. (I own eight Magnavox and Philips HDD/DVD recorders.)

The first post in this thread is the gateway to a wealth of information concerning Magnavox and Philips HDD/DVD recorders:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?p=12244086#post12244086