Verbatim DAXON or CMC?

vbimport

#1

I’m planning on burning a hundred CDs in the next couple of days, and I’m having difficulty deciding which to use… I could choose to use my stockpile of Verbatim MIMalaysia CD-Rs made by Daxon ©2005, or a newly purchased batch of Verbatim MIT CD-Rs made my CMC ©2007. I’ve tried a test disc from both batches and all my players/standalones have no trouble reading them (relatively new equipment), but I fear that those who will receive my discs will have problems playing it on ancient/older standalones.

I need help! Which is better in terms of compatibility and reliability? CMC or DAXON? I’ll be using these for audio by the way. Maybe someone with extensive experience on one or the other (better yet, both!) could vouch for their ‘capabilities’. Is Grade-A Daxon better than Grade-A CMC (or vice-versa) or are they simply both crappy? :stuck_out_tongue:


Verbatim Made in Malaysia (Daxon)

OR

Verbatim Made in Taiwan (CMC)


#2

I have experiences with Benq/Intenso branded Daxons and Verbatim/Imation branded CMC CD-Rs.
While the Daxons have much better C1 & C2 errors values, CMC were more compatible with old and crappy audio players (old Technics & Aiwa CD player, cheap no-name CD MP3 players, 8 years old Panasonic and Sony DVD players etc).
So I would recommend you to use rather CMC made Verbatims.

Reliability - all my old (2-6 years) Daxon & CMC CD-rs are still in perfect shape, except some ultra cheap C-grade shiny top CMCs.


#3

Are those CMC azo ? If yes then they should have a slightly better compatability in most car players. The difference is small but I know that 3 types of media perform better then average when it comes to playback compatability.

Mitsui silver
Verbatim AZO
Taiyo Yuden

So if the CMC’s are using an azo dye then I vote for the CMC’s. IF there ptahlocyanine then it shouldn’t matter much.


#4

I discovered Daxon CDs (Imation branded) last year and found them to be of very good quality, despite costing only £7.99 per 100. Among Phthalocyanine CDs I would rate them second only to the best batches of Maxell branded Ritek (and much better than most Ritek I have had, even some batches of Maxell). It is too early to know that they will age well but so far so good.

Most of the Daxon CDs I have written were audio CDs and they have played in every CD player so far without any problems. I was going to stock up with them but sadly the third pack of Imation I ordered were Moser Baer. They are OK with a good writer but not in the same league as the Daxons. With a bit of luck I might find some of those Verbatim branded Daxons.

In fact the Daxon CDs are still the only ones that produce a good result with my Lite-On CD & DVD writers. Everything else I have tried in those drives usually has C2 errors, even Taiyo Yuden & Verbatim DL+ AZO CDs written at moderate speed. The Daxons however consistently give an acceptable result even at full speed, so I don’t feel I have to check every CD.

I have never used any Verbatim branded CMC Magnetics CDs. The CMC that I have used were not of good quality, but they were brands that would probably not use CMC’s best grade of disc.

[QUOTE=dakhaas;2122894]Are those CMC azo ?[/QUOTE]

If the have a CMC Magnetics ATIP code then they won’t be AZO. Also I think that the new Verbatim labels still say if they are AZO even though they have stopped calling them DataLife Plus.


#5

[QUOTE=pepst;2122883]I have experiences with Benq/Intenso branded Daxons and Verbatim/Imation branded CMC CD-Rs.
While the Daxons have much better C1 & C2 errors values, CMC were more compatible with old and crappy audio players (old Technics & Aiwa CD player, cheap no-name CD MP3 players, 8 years old Panasonic and Sony DVD players etc).
So I would recommend you to use rather CMC made Verbatims.

Reliability - all my old (2-6 years) Daxon & CMC CD-rs are still in perfect shape, except some ultra cheap C-grade shiny top CMCs.[/QUOTE]

That also follows the tests that I have done, scans were better on the Daxons, although I do not have access to a diverse sample set of standalones to test for compatibility. I’ve also had some Maxell and HP CMC CD-Rs too that scan less beautifully than the Daxons but I haven’t encountered problems with them anyway. It’s the Daxon MID that I haven’t had enough experience with… So this input helps! :smiley:

[QUOTE=dakhaas;2122894]Are those CMC azo ? If yes then they should have a slightly better compatability in most car players. The difference is small but I know that 3 types of media perform better then average when it comes to playback compatability.

Mitsui silver
Verbatim AZO
Taiyo Yuden

So if the CMC’s are using an azo dye then I vote for the CMC’s. IF there ptahlocyanine then it shouldn’t matter much.[/QUOTE]

I bitched about the shortage of AZO CD-Rs in the What have you just bought? CD/DVD related or otherwise thread, unfortunately these aren’t AZO discs. I’ve attached a new image to show the proper packaging (first one), I was too sleepy to notice I’ve attached a different packaging pic! (printable!) As for dye type, the Daxons and CMC are phthalocyanine - probably very good phthalo discs - but I would’ve rather had some AZO than CMC phthalo, that’s for sure! Those are cooler looking discs too! :frowning:

:iagree: :iagree: :iagree:

Just look for Made in Malaysia ©2005 - I’ve seen 50- and 100-pk spindles! :slight_smile:

Although I’ve read here in CDF that a member has reported “peeling” on Daxons, I hope it doesn’t happen to me!

[QUOTE=Ibex;2122975]I have never used any Verbatim branded CMC Magnetics CDs. The CMC that I have used were not of good quality, but they were brands that would probably not use CMC’s best grade of disc.

If the have a CMC Magnetics ATIP code then they won’t be AZO. Also I think that the new Verbatim labels still say if they are AZO even though they have stopped calling them DataLife Plus.[/QUOTE]

Yep, they’re not AZO, just plain CMC - A-grade probably. The AZO I saw definitely had the string “AZO” on the outer hub near the dye (something similar to CMC code - CD-R 80CWLHT-8645 AZO) and had AZO on the shrinkwrap itself (second pic below).

Thanks for all your input! I’ll probably use the CMC for audio CDs and the Daxons for safekeeping data. The AZOs would’ve made this thread irrelevant as it would’ve been good wherever I’d have planned to use it. Thanks all! Time to burn! :smiley:




#6

I’d go CMC as they seem good and produce low jitter for me personally. They don’t have any peeling or scratching problems as many other Phthalo discs do. I think Verbatim have ensured that the top coat is pretty sturdy so it won’t get damaged so easily.