Users report Windows 10 Anniversary update fully freezes their PC

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Users report Windows 10 Anniversary update fully freezes their PC[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2015/07/windows10-laptop-95x75.png[/newsimage]

Users with the Windows 10 Anniversary update complain their system fully freezes after they upgraded. When they login, their system freezes for a couple of seconds and then becomes unresponsive. It’s unclear what causes the issues.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/users-report-windows-10-anniversary-update-fully-freezes-pc-80147/](http://www.myce.com/news/users-report-windows-10-anniversary-update-fully-freezes-pc-80147/)

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#2

I notice in the comments that this seems to be partly related to logging in using an online account. This may be the reason why I have not been affected by the challenge on any computer as they all use local accounts…


#3

[QUOTE=Xercus;2778999]I notice in the comments that this seems to be partly related to logging in using an online account. This may be the reason why I have not been affected by the challenge on any computer as they all use local accounts…[/QUOTE]So, perhaps this freeze is caused by Microsoft’s servers going too slow. Personally, I don’t see any benefit to using online accounts. Local accounts, and/or active directory accounts are far more logical, since they’re stored on machines you can control.


#4

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2779053]So, perhaps this freeze is caused by Microsoft’s servers going too slow. Personally, I don’t see any benefit to using online accounts. Local accounts, and/or active directory accounts are far more logical, since they’re stored on machines you can control.[/QUOTE]

It would be my bias as well, you would want to keep your account under your own lock and key and not Microsoft’s as that would mean giving away far too much control from a security perspective.

Luckily, the change is only a few steps away, hiding in Control Panel, User Accounts, change account type and select Local Account.
I would suggest, based on the above that users do that before doing the upgrade. All it takes is a logoff and a logon before applying the upgrade. For those insisting on handing over control to Microsoft for reasons I would not know, they can do so after the upgrade is done.


#5

[QUOTE=Xercus;2779054]It would be my bias as well, you would want to keep your account under your own lock and key and not Microsoft’s as that would mean giving away far too much control from a security perspective.

Luckily, the change is only a few steps away, hiding in Control Panel, User Accounts, change account type and select Local Account.
I would suggest, based on the above that users do that before doing the upgrade. All it takes is a logoff and a logon before applying the upgrade. For those insisting on handing over control to Microsoft for reasons I would not know, they can do so after the upgrade is done.[/QUOTE]
Unfortunately for the savvy users that is easy to get to the john/jane doe don’t know about this until it’s too late those are the one fired up about this problem more or less.