Users can’t decrypt HDD anymore after Windows 10 Anniversary Update

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Users can’t decrypt HDD anymore after Windows 10 Anniversary Update[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/08/myce-bitlocker-recovery-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

The Windows 10 Anniversary update causes issues with encrypted HDDs for some users. After installing the update the HDD can no longer be decrypted and Windows 10 is asking users for a recovery key.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/users-cant-decrypt-hdd-anymore-windows-10-anniversary-update-80231/](http://www.myce.com/news/users-cant-decrypt-hdd-anymore-windows-10-anniversary-update-80231/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Well, that ought to teach them a lesson, one about not trusting MS for your system wide encryption. It has been hacked already and so if you are affected, search the net…


#3

Hmmm. i bitlocked my drives after the anniversary update. Am i still affected?

[QUOTE=Xercus;2779540]Well, that ought to teach them a lesson, one about not trusting MS for your system wide encryption. It has been hacked already and so if you are affected, search the net…[/QUOTE]
Que? Bitlocker has been cracked? That’s news to me! Can i have a link?


#4

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2779610]Hmmm. i bitlocked my drives [B]after[/B] the anniversary update. Am i still affected?

Que? Bitlocker has been cracked? That’s news to me! Can i have a link?[/QUOTE]

No you should not be affected if you did it after to my knowledge.

Sure, Black Hat did that as early as back in 2010. While I can’t find the link, there is a Microsoft ‘downplay’ of the attack here. The attack requires physical access to the box which would be within the realms of the article presented here. Search for ‘Bitlocker hack’ and you should get more info.


#5

[QUOTE=Xercus;2779612]No you should not be affected if you did it after to my knowledge.

Sure, Black Hat did that as early as back in 2010. While I can’t find the link, there is a Microsoft ‘downplay’ of the attack here. The attack requires physical access to the box which would be within the realms of the article presented here. Search for ‘Bitlocker hack’ and you should get more info.[/QUOTE]

Oh with the TPM. Yeah i know that. I don’t have TPM fortunately.
Don’t like Bitlocker that much, but i’m forced to use it by the company.

I rather use VeraCrypt. Can’t wait what the audit will find.


#6

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2779615]Oh with the TPM. Yeah i know that. I don’t have TPM fortunately.
Don’t like Bitlocker that much, but i’m forced to use it by the company.

I rather use VeraCrypt. Can’t wait what the audit will find.[/QUOTE]
Since BitLocker uses TPM by default, it means you have a somewhat advanced setup.
VeraCrypt is a great cross platform open source choice built on the old TrueCrypt and comes with better encryption routines so is more secure than BitLocker.
In the context of encryption, how trustworthy the company is really gets interesting unless it is open source and so transparent

Given the information harvesting and privacy trespassing done by a vanilla Windows 10 express install, Microsoft have lost any credibility for encryption and no official statement from Microsoft can change that. [B]Bitlocker must be seen as unsafe, period![/B] What are the chances of the password being sent to Microsoft? They do harvest your other passwords unless you do something about it and so why wouldn’t they?

In your case, unless policy denies, I would use VeraCrypt on top of BitLocker and create a few encrypted containers or hidden volumes… That way BitLocker is the simple disk encryptor with VeraCrypt providing additional security. In such usage scenario, BitLocker and VeraCrypt are compatible and should not cause compatibility issues.

BTW: I heard the audit should be done this fall, but have no further information on the subject and so yes, I am eagerly awaiting the results too :flower:


#7

[QUOTE=Xercus;2779623]

Since BitLocker uses TPM by default, it means you have a somewhat advanced setup.[/quote]

Err yeah. I think i can safely say that most of my IT equipment have very advanced setups. After working almost 25 years in IT you get to know some tricks :slight_smile:

In your case, unless policy denies

Let’s say i could get in some trouble if i use too much of my own set of tools :slight_smile:


#8

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2779628]Err yeah. I think i can safely say that most of my IT equipment have very advanced setups. After working almost 25 years in IT you get to know some tricks :)[/QUOTE]
Um, yes, the opposite result would really be the surprise I guess :bigsmile: :flower:


#9

To be frank, the fact that BitLocker has been cracked doesn’t surprise me at all. Xercus said himself (or is it herself?) that BitLocker was introduced in Vista, so it’s almost a decade old. Something that old is rarely secure in the digital age.

It seems to me that this is another reason why Microsoft should be embarrassed of themselves. I don’t see things in the GNU/Linux world breaking nearly as often as I do in the Windows world (although I don’t spend too much time with rolling distros), which means that the Microsoft employees must be either very stupid and/or too intoxicated to function.


#10

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2779688]To be frank, the fact that BitLocker has been cracked doesn’t surprise me at all. Xercus said himself (or is it herself?) that BitLocker was introduced in Vista, so it’s almost a decade old. Something that old is rarely secure in the digital age.[/QUOTE]

Bitlocker has been upgraded with better encryption methods the latest Windows 10 build. It even tells you so when you start encrypting your drive.