USB Port Remains Active when Safely Removed USB Device

hi,

i am having problems with safely removing my External USB Portable HDD’s from an Mbeat usb 2.0/3.0 Hub , the HDD’s are NOT powered by mains , , they are usb powered . i have also used different hubs and they have the same issue. the Hubs i use are powered.

the problem isnt just me it looks like it on all win 7 pc’s .and is i win 7 issue.

i have looked all over the net to find a remedy but i cant get it to safely turn off the usb 3.0 hdd’s.

i have win7 pro 64 bit, i am running a Mbeat 7 port usb 2.0/3.0 hub which is connected to the back usb 3 port of my pc .

now when i goto click the icon in the task bar to safely remove hdd’s i click it and it says it is now safe to remove hardware, BUT the drives still keeps spinning for ever , they do not stop at all ,and the little power light stays on as well. so its not disabling the drive .

now i tried the link below to rectify the problem

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2401954

Global Setting

To apply the workaround globally for all enumerated USB devices, add a REG_DWORD value named DisableOnSoftRemove that has a value of 1 to the following registry subkey:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\usbhub\HubG
Click Start, click Run, type regedit in the Open box, and then click OK .
Locate and then click the following subkey in the registry:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\usbhub
On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click Key.
Type HubG for the name of the new key, and then press ENTER.
On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD (32-bit) Value.
Type DisableOnSoftRemove for the name of the DWORD Value, and then press ENTER.
Right-click DisableOnSoftRemove, and then click Modify.
In the Value data box, type 1 , and then click OK.
Exit Registry Editor.

and that works but only if the hub is plugged into the usb 2.0 slots , and only for hdd of usb 2.0 speeds , once i plug it back into the usb 3 slot none of the hdds turn off . i use usb 3 hdds and usb 2 hdds so i really need this problem solved .

if there is any info i have left out please tell me so you can better help me .

thanks guys .

Try to use the program given with the HDD, in that there is option to safely remove/unplug which actually turns it off

[QUOTE=javedc;2678746]Try to use the program given with the HDD, in that there is option to safely remove/unplug which actually turns it off[/QUOTE]

there is no hardware , this is a far more complex problem ,

thanks for your comment.

I don’t know the model of your USB-powered drive (a Buffalo?) but mine says “Plug directly into motherboard port, not a hub”. But there’s also software that Buffalo supplied with my PCT500u3 that I have used for Disconnects.

I’ve never tried going thru a hub - I assumed the drive wouldn’t power up in the first place, but yours does.

I don’t see how the drive could still be spinning after the USB cable is disconnected from the drive, hub’d or not. That must be some great battery.

Can you give us model-specs or a link to that product?

Removing the usb device via the software option does not result into a power down on the usb port, but just a method of making sure nothing is read and written to and from the device, therefore being able to disconnect safely. Depending on the comlex of electronics involded in the usb device itself it may or may not recognize the disconnect command. Most don’t.

Also most new motherboards provide power so that you can charge your phone/tablet.

I think that gigabyte gives a utility so that you can switch off the power on the USB ports when th PC is shutdown.

i am using a
seagate 1.5tb usb 3.0 portable HDD ,
a-ram 32gb usb 3 stick
WD my passport 750gb HDD usb 2

[B][U]ChristineBCW[/U][/B] all are portable drives . and all have previously turned off on previous pcs i have had. a hub is an extension of the amount of usb ports so instead of having 2 usb 3.0 ports in the back of your pc , a hub plugs into one of those usb 3.0 ports and then you have 7 usb 3.0 ports now available .

all the portable hdds/ sticks i have always power down after you use the safely remove hardware icon , but they are not doing it on this win 7 machine. i have scoured the net and it seems almost all people who have win 7 is having the same issue.

[B][U]Mr. Belvedere[/U][/B] also i agree that once the safely remove hardware icon is selected then no more data can be transferred but you cannot unplug the drive from the hub because the drive is still spinning . i have to wait till i turn off the computer to unplug it.

[U]my pc [/U]

  • Intel i7-2600 cpu 3.40Ghz
  • Microsoft Windows 7 Pro (64bits)
  • Asus GTX 560 1gb Graphics card
  • Asus P8Z68-M PRO motherboard

I assumed you were doing these three steps: (1) Issue the SAFELY REMOVE request, (2) that’s granted and you see NOW DISCONNECT command, and (3) I assumed you were THEN actually disconnecting the cable.

But I have a feeling this isn’t what you’re doing. You’re not going to Step 3 - actually, physically disconnecting the USB cable. Your past experience has been “The Ext HDD should power down even with a USB Cable run thru a hub” but now they stay running.

As long as the USB cable is connected, yes?

What about connecting straight to the motherboard’s USB port - without a hub? Does this change any Ext HDD behavior?

I assume “no” because you said every system seems to have this problem.

What happens when you disconnect the USB cable from the still-spinning Ext HDD? I can’t check your exact model’s specs because exact model numbers haven’t been presented - but I anticipate that “shut off power” initiates the proper “head parking” procedure because this has been [I]de riguer[/I] for many years in HDD designs.

The SAFELY REMOVE process has also been addressing static charges on USB ports, hoping to avoid a Gaussian effect of static-buildup that might disable the delicate port-electronics permanently. This isn’t too important for a cable, or an external device. But having a motherboard’s USB ports disabled permanently is a bigger deal.

(I’m wandering thru the WD MyPassport 750 Find Answer link…)

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2678770]I assumed you were doing these three steps: (1) Issue the SAFELY REMOVE request, (2) that’s granted and you see NOW DISCONNECT command, and (3) I assumed you were THEN actually disconnecting the cable. [B]Yes that’s what i previously did , i will only disconnect the cable if the drive is not spinning , but the drive stays spinning so i have to leave it connected till i turn off the PC. i don’t want to corrupt the HDD by disconnecting it while is is spinning .[/B]

But I have a feeling this isn’t what you’re doing. You’re not going to Step 3 - actually, physically disconnecting the USB cable. Your past experience has been “The Ext HDD should power down even with a USB Cable run thru a hub” but now they stay running.

As long as the USB cable is connected, yes?

What about connecting straight to the motherboard’s USB port - without a hub? Does this change any Ext HDD behavior? [B] i tried that and it does the same thing, it just wont power down like it is supposed to . it only powers down for usb 2.0 devices .[/B]

I assume “no” because you said every system seems to have this problem.

What happens when you disconnect the USB cable from the still-spinning Ext HDD? I can’t check your exact model’s specs because exact model numbers haven’t been presented - but I anticipate that “shut off power” initiates the proper “head parking” procedure because this has been [I]de riguer[/I] for many years in HDD designs. [B]it will make a noise like a sudden stopping brake noise not good for it .[/B]

The SAFELY REMOVE process has also been addressing static charges on USB ports, hoping to avoid a Gaussian effect of static-buildup that might disable the delicate port-electronics permanently. This isn’t too important for a cable, or an external device. But having a motherboard’s USB ports disabled permanently is a bigger deal.

[B]hope this is enough info . let me know . personally i dont know too much about PC’s but i definatley know its not an issue with the HDD’s and that its a win 7 issue . like when i applied that reg edit in the first post i could then get the drives to power down exactly as they should , but it only works for usb 2.0 devices .[/B]

(I’m wandering thru the WD MyPassport 750 Find Answer link…)[/QUOTE]

seagate 1.5tb usb 2 & 3 expansion portable HDD win 7 compatable stax1500302

and WD 750gb my passport usb 2 portable HDD wdbabm7500abk-00

it happens on all usb drive and memory sticks , different brands and capacities.

Ghost… next day…

Thanks for the notes. After reading thru more of those HDD guides, yes, I see the “wait for power light to go out, then disconnect” comments. My Buffalo has never had that problem and I’ve never disconnected it when the power-light was on, but I also assumed I could. I still think the HDDs are manufactured so head-parking won’t be a problem - clearing the Data Buffers might be!

Your “crashing whirring” sounds wouldn’t make ME feel comfortable about doing it a second time, as you wrote!

I see a lot of forum-questions like this across the computer-world, with few certain answers.

This means one thing: “Microsoft said HERE IS THE STANDARD COMMAND SET TO USE and the HDD manufacturers used that, and then Microsoft has changed the command structure, the verbs - something.”

This is a typical way for “drivers to not work” - the driver-programmers didn’t screw up - Microsoft issues so many bulletins and, somewhere, their own processes get screwed up, lost, betrayed, etc. And it’s the Driver World that appears incompetent.

This is probably going to be more-quickly solved by a Manufacturer’s Driver Fix, but it SHOULD be fixed inside Windows, not thru adding drivers by each and every manufacturer.

(EDIT: This could also have the unpleasant complexity of needing USB driver modifications, thereby affecting Motherboard Manufacturers and whatever USB Control Chipset they use, too. So many MORE fingers to point at each other!!)

If your harddisk is not older than 10 years you can safely assume the harddisk has the autopark feature built-in its hardware. :smiley:

clearing the Data Buffers might be!
Hence you need to click the safely remove option. This will clear all the read/writing cache buffers and stop all other data traffic to the device.


I have just tested this with my a USB device with a nice LED on it.

After using it on a USB 2 port , i clicked the safely remove button. The LED doesn’t stop working (so current must still flow towards it), but the drive letter or the device is not accessible anymore.

After using it on a USB 3 port , i clicked the safely remove button. The LED stoped working!

Oooh, so this might a USB 2 vs 3 vs Device issue?

As for clearing the buffers - I don’t know what Auto-Flush time-limits are set on any particular hard-drive. I’d assume “milliseconds” and that some Last Gulp Of Data doesn’t sit, forever, in the Buffer until it receives some formal engraved invitation, “OK, I’m getting ready to lose power, so All Components - join hands, sing GOODNIGHT IRENE and flush yourselves onto the HDD surface.”

Because it’s pretty rare for HDDs to lose data even in emergency power-loss scenarios - they must be flushing their buffers to their Write Process fairly often (miliseconds).

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2678977]Oooh, so this might a USB 2 vs 3 vs Device issue?

As for clearing the buffers - I don’t know what Auto-Flush time-limits are set on any particular hard-drive. I’d assume “milliseconds” and that some Last Gulp Of Data doesn’t sit, forever, in the Buffer until it receives some formal engraved invitation, “OK, I’m getting ready to lose power, so All Components - join hands, sing GOODNIGHT IRENE and flush yourselves onto the HDD surface.”

Because it’s pretty rare for HDDs to lose data even in emergency power-loss scenarios - they must be flushing their buffers to their Write Process fairly often (miliseconds).[/QUOTE]

i thinks its a usb 3 thing for me , and i still think that the drive needs to completely power down . any other thought on what i can do ?

thanks .

I don’t have any great suggestions - none testable, none tried-and-true. I think a 10-second wait is all you’d need to power it down successfully. You’ve probably already experimented with that.

To give some support to that, there are two issues that hard-drive power-downs pay attention to: (1) flushing the buffer, and (2) parking the Read-Write heads.

Flushing the buffers is something controlled by the hard-drive’s electronics - it’s own circuit board. The computer doesn’t control this - this is what the hard drive does. And it’s done in miliseconds.

Second, the Auto-Head-Parking routine was being implemented by the late '80s and into the '90s, and became so commonplace that the lowest-end cheapest HDD makers by the end of the '90s were rolling out products like this. So, for perhaps all of this century, that’s been the only hardware that’s available - an auto-parking HDD.

Of course, with all these back-patting reassurances, we still don’t live in a Perfect World where everything operates correctly all of the time. Even good equipment thinks it can help me screw things up. (Why oh why?!! I can screw things up myself!! I don’t need inanimate objects helping me!!)

If I bought this at NewEgg, I’d complain to them. They can’t fix it. But they MIGHT have a big-enough stick (publicity!) to make sure the manufacturers stop pointing fingers at everyone else who CAN solve this.

If it helps any, there’s a report that the next generation of Intel CPUs is having USB 3 problems.

Doesn’t that make you feel soooo much better?!! “Me and Intel - we’re pals-!” Yeah. Gee - I bet the Titanic was full of pals, too, huh?

I’m curious, if you turn the computer off, doesn’t the drive end up losing its power as if you just pulled the plug from the USB port? That’s been my experience with drives that aren’t told to sleep (or don’t respond to the sleep command, if there is one) during shut-down.

Ghosts, yes, this too. Tell us how you’ve handled the issue thus far. (I think he mentioned he’d power-down his rig, come to think of it.)

I try to avoid entire-rig powering downs, myself… in fact, this is one big complaint against SSDs instead of the Velociraptor Airport-Runway noise levels - if our house gets too quiet by power-downs, then Hubby’s screams for help and mercy carry outside the dungeon.

I just need a few more of those 10,000 RPM drives. Who needs silence?

I don’t have USB 3 yet so I can’t test with it.
I have a HDD powered by the USB2 port.
It’s LED goes off when I safely remove it.
I don’t use the Windows for this I have a software called Zentimo.
I got it from GAOTD.
The light stays on on my wall wart powered drive but it powers down it that it goes quite.

I have never had an issue simply pulling usb devices including multiple hdd’s without ever having a problem or failure with any device…

[QUOTE=ghosts;2679764]i still think that the drive needs to completely power down[/quote] It does not need that. It needs no data traffic when you power it down. Mostly because of open files, but these things are actually quite rare.

You can test this yourself with a disposable usb drive. Copy/paste a lot of crap to it, then suddenly remove it. It won’t crash as much as you think.

[QUOTE=Albert;2679774]I’m curious, if you turn the computer off, doesn’t the drive end up losing its power as if you just pulled the plug from the USB port? That’s been my experience with drives that aren’t told to sleep (or don’t respond to the sleep command, if there is one) during shut-down.[/QUOTE]

yes it does power down when the pc is off .