USB 3.0 BD-XL writers that can also playback on TV

vbimport

#1

Currently, there are USB 3.0 external BD-XL writers in the market. I just wonder when I connect the USB 3.0 external BD-XL writer to the USB port of a TV, whether any of them can:

  • locate media files in a data DVD/BD and play these files, treating the BD-XL writer as a USB Flash drive, and/or

  • direct playback of a Bluray video disc

It would be nice if the BD-XL writer can double as a DVD and BD player. However, will the USB port on the TV be able to supply enough current to drive the BDXL writer,especially the TV only has USB 2.0 ports?

Most USB 3.0 drives is solely powered by the USB port, but I don’t want to get a USB 2.0 drive, as it would take forever to read everything out of a 125GB BD-XL disc!


#2

I’ve never heard of a TV that can access an optical drive meant for computers.

If anyone can provide a link saying something else, I’ll be interested to see it.


#3

[QUOTE=mark1dx;2749364]Currently, there are USB 3.0 external BD-XL writers in the market. I just wonder when I connect the USB 3.0 external BD-XL writer to the USB port of a TV, whether any of them can:

  • locate media files in a data DVD/BD and play these files, treating the BD-XL writer as a USB Flash drive, [/quote]Most televisions do not support the file systems used on optical discs (ISO9660, UDF), and there’s the issue where an optical drive identifies itself differently from a mass storage device (thumb drives, hard drives, many generic memory card readers, etc). Except for a few drives that can emulate a FAT32 file system on-the-fly & can appear as a mass storage device (none of which support BD media; an example is the Samsung SE-208BW DVDRW drive/“Optical Hub”), you cannot do much to work around that limitation if the TV itself doesn’t have the necessary support.

and/or

  • direct playback of a Bluray video disc
    Nope; there’s an extra bit of software to be compliant with the various protection schemes of proper video discs. The software also has to be able to navigate the structure of a video disc (menus, different sub-files that make up the entire main feature, etc), and this software wouldn’t be supplied with a TV. It would be up to the optical drive to do double duty as a full-fledged player, and while those have been produced over the years, they’ve never really caught on in any appreciable amount. To the best of my knowledge, these devices are actually often lower-end player-only models that could not burn discs, though there have been a few exceptions that could burn. Again, none of these were BD-capable devices.

#4

Thanks… I wish to convert video recordings to H.265 (to save space) and put them into a M-disc BD-XL for archival purpose. In this way, I can put up to 100hours of videos into a BD-XL, or 25 hours of HD videos into a BD. My original plan is direct playback from a data BD-XL.

From what you said, is it fair to say that the only practical way to do is is to open the data M-Disc BD-XL from a computer and the let the computer send data to the TV via either HDMI or chromecast?

But if I have a barebone computer that can handle both Blu-ray video disc, and Blu-ray data disc, then who needs a BD player?


#5

At about $40 a BD player is cheaper and more reliable by far than any current PC solution for watching Blu-Ray from the original disk.


#6

If you are going to use H265, then no current Blu-ray player will work. I’m not even sure any current player can handle XL discs, though I haven’t checked to see if that capability has been added to any of them.

When the new Ultra HD Blu-ray players come out, they will be using a variety of XL discs (33 and 66gb)for 4k content. But who knows if they will be able to play data discs on 100gb XL discs.

What do you plan to use to play the H265 content from a computer? PowerDVD 14 Ultra should work if you need a commercial player that can also play menus in current Blu-ray. If you can do without menu support, Media Player Classic Home Cinema or Potplayer would be my choices, and both are free. You might also want to look at Kodi, for a more complete media center software.


#7

My plan is to use M-Disc BD-XL for archival of video clips. This is why I want to use H.265 to minimize the number of discs. If BD-XL turns out to have a worse price/GB ratio than BD, then I am happy to use BD.

I don’t care about titles etc, though if the movie comes with SRT subtitle files, I want the player to handle that. I intend to use some software like VLC, which supports H.265.

So in another word, if I were to put movies onto a data BD, am I limiting myself to computer playback?

And if so, then from the user’s point of view, does it matter anymore? And is a home theatre system now reduced to a barebone PC, with a TV tuner card installed?


#8

[QUOTE=mark1dx;2749387]

So in another word, if I were to put movies onto a data BD, am I limiting myself to computer playback?[/QUOTE]

At the moment, yes. Future players will include support for H265, and probably support for data discs with this format, but that has not been demonstrated yet.

And if so, then from the user’s point of view, does it matter anymore? And is a home theatre system now reduced to a barebone PC, with a TV tuner card installed?
Home theater pc’s can be very capable, or barebones as you say. Tuners can be used with satellite/cable or over the air tv broadcasts. Streaming media sites on the net are also commonly used with HTPC’s.

One thing that is becoming more and more widespread is use of hard drives instead of optical media for storage. In fact, optical storage is seen as obsolete by many in home theater forums. Optical discs are seen as a delivery system from the movie studios to the customer, but then ripped to hard drives. You still have the movie in a hard copy with the original disc, and many use multiple hard drives for backup to keep from re-ripping/converting in case of hdd failure.


#9

My plan is also to use hard drive for storage. However for important documents, family photos, video clips, and when space allows, movies, I would like an extra way to archive.

But when my family wants to view different clips, the intention is still to navigate the hard drive, find the clip and play!

My TV can directly access a USB flash drive (fat32), navigate its folder structure and fetch h.264 movies.

So for H.265 on BD data discs, I would play through the computer instead, with the computer connected to the TV, right?


#10

[QUOTE=mark1dx;2749451]So for H.265 on BD data discs, I would play through the computer instead, with the computer connected to the TV, right?[/QUOTE]

Yes, as far as I am aware, that is the only current method of playing H265 burned on a Blu-ray disc as data.