US ISPs team up with MPAA & RIAA

I just posted the article US ISPs team up with MPAA & RIAA.

US ISPs team up with MPAA & RIAA to tackle piracy.

Click to read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/us-isps-team-up-with-mpaa-riaa-64868/](http://www.myce.com/news/us-isps-team-up-with-mpaa-riaa-64868/)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

This is definitely the “private sector” equivalent of SOPA/PIPA. Here’s the real difference: when SOPA/PIPA came around, the vast majority of websites started protesting it; whereas, “Six Strikes” is a system YOU pay for. Because Wikipedia, Google, ect. haven’t protested this, people don’t even know their privacy is at stake.

Somtimes people’s radars aren’t up for something that has not been implemented, and to my knowledge the ISPs have not made it a POINT to INFORM users of this new system… I personally recieved no notices of the implementation yet… and I doubt you have either… this is something that is just being advertised in cyberspace (the internet) sofar…

Once being a victim of this harassment, you’ll see quite a stir about it and new protests mounting against it…

In reality, do speed limited stop speeders?
What this really is trying to do is slow down piracy rather than stop it…
But they can’t have/use that as a goal… the goal is to stop… and if by some lesser standard of success they slow it down, that’s the real success their looking for.

The key here is using this in combination with COST EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVES (paid) which users would adopt… if that doesn’t happen and ISPs start seeing revenue loss… this will break itself apart in months…

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2664516]Somtimes people’s radars aren’t up for something that has not been implemented, and to my knowledge the ISPs have not made it a POINT to INFORM users of this new system… I personally recieved no notices of the implementation yet… and I doubt you have either… this is something that is just being advertised in cyberspace (the internet) sofar…
[/QUOTE]

It’s already been confirmed that these five ISPs have signed up to the ‘six strikes’ system. So it’s not a matter of if but when this will be introduced.

I doubt they’re willing to broadcast this to users though which is why you’re hearing this first through Myce.

[B]Wombler[/B]

Wombler:
If they did that, customers would realize they’re being given the finger, and would switch providers as soon as their contracts end. And when it comes to things that cause a loss of customers, big businesses are only as honest as the present situation, and applicable law, requires them to be.

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2664568]Wombler:
If they did that, customers would realize they’re being given the finger, and would switch providers as soon as their contracts end. And when it comes to things that cause a loss of customers, big businesses are only as honest as the present situation, and applicable law, requires them to be.[/QUOTE]

All the info is out there it’s just not many have picked up on this yet.

Check out this further article I’ve just finished posting.

[B]Wombler[/B]

I don’t see why isp’s would go to this system, it seems like it wouldn’t be in their interest to do so, unless they are a media company as well as an isp.

Here’s my take on this. The ISP’s are doing this in part because they want to show that they are not responsible for the pirated material that is flowing through their networks, and that they are [B]voluntarily[/B] cooperating with the media companies. Thus, they are forestalling any government intervention.

But lets see how this plays out. Someone who is a casual user of bittorrents may not see a notice for a while. But once they get a couple of notices from their ISP, they may decide its time to cover their tracks. So they spend a bit of cash on a VPN specifically set up for torrents. A brief look around at the ones with the best reputation shows that this will cost anywhere from $4 a month to $7 a month. Now that this casual downloader is actually having to [B]pay [/B]for his downloads, my feeling is that his downloading habits will increase…significantly. But the way the media companies have set up their observation of P2P traffic, they will not be able to track down these downloaders.

Its my feeling that the media companies and the ISP 6 strike program will not only be ineffective, but will push more and more people into anonymous P2P downloading, and thereby increase piracy in the US. It may be a very nice boon for the VPN services however.

I think you’re spot on there Kerry. :iagree:

If you have to pay for something you feel more obliged to use it and this whole process could backfire on CCI significantly by both driving users to become undetectable and increasing piracy overall.

Of course it won’t look like that in the stats as they’ll only have figures relating to non-VPN traffic.

[B]Wombler[/B]

I might do a YouTube video on this.

In the United States, privacy is something a lot of us take very seriously. I also think what they’re doing is illegal. They are not affiliated with the government, they aren’t law enforcement, they don’t have warrants. They’re conducting domestic surveillance essentially. I’d like to see it go to the Supreme Court to hear their take on it because it could also go the other way - you’re on their network so they reserve the right to monitor you.

It’s all the more reason to buy a logless VPN.

I like the way it was before, where if somebody was abusing the network by doing illegal things, then the copyright holder had to go get a court order for an ISP to hand over somebody’s information.

It’s sad because you can boycott ISPs that cooperate with this, but what happens when they all start cooperating? It’s not like you can just create your own ISP.

In the end, it just boils down to money-hungry jerks that suck at protecting their content, so they make everyone else suffer.

I don’t see why isp’s would go to this system

Because of a possibility of licence recall?

I don’t know about US actually, but, in Russia, when the government ordered ISPs and carriers voluntarily implement support of SORM-2 surveillance technology, the rejection meant imminent problems with licence (ISPs and carriers must obtain special licence to provide their services) prolongation or even a licence recall.

Do ISPs in US have to obtain similar licences? If yes - is there any possibility to have problems with licensing if ISP has rejected to participate in “six strikes”?

Excuse me my English.

I think this entire thing is stupid anyway. Copyright laws were designed to make it so you couldn’t take someone else’s work and call it your own. It wasn’t designed so that a copyright holder can go sue anybody that shares something they bought. It’s a giant stretch of the spirit of the law itself. Not to mention, what is the problem with sharing copyrighted material if you aren’t claiming it as your own, and you aren’t turning a profit from it? For example, what’s the harm in buying a movie, and if my buddy wants to watch it, burn him a copy? Or what if I have a movie, don’t want the original tarnished, and make a copy?

November 28th for program to begin based on a previous article from this site.

IMO, the main reason that ISPs would go along with this is to limit upgrade costs in the future to increase bandwidth to their customers since downloading takes up a lot of it. Also, it might increase their profits from on-demand viewing of movies, TV shows etc. There has to be a profit motive for them to undertake something like this on behalf of the RIAA and MPAA.

You may have hit the nail on the head there as very few companies nowadays do anything without financial motivation.

[B]Wombler[/B]

Personally, I’m beginning to imagine the possibilty that a small part of this is to take revenge. Like Wombler said, it’s all about financial motivation. The big media companies lost money, so they want to make ALL us suffer for it. That might have been the REAL purpose behind PIPA/SOPA. To make us suffer like “we” have made them suffer. Of course, this is just my imagination. I can’t believe that they would actually do that.

The IPSs might have struck a deal with the RIAA/MPAA that gives them immunity from getting sued by them for promoting copyright infringement. I don’t see how the ISPs can go too far in enforcing this if the subscriber doesn’t admit guilt. I also think the RIAA/MPAA think this will be a way for them to “reach out and hassle” a large number of people who are mainly casual downloaders. I don’t think this will help the pi$$ poor image that the RIAA has at this point.