Upgrade CPU

vbimport

#1

I can pick up a AMD Dual Cpu 4200 2.20Ghz, for about $70US, I have an E-machine T5020, w/Intel P-4, 519, 200 G hardrive, 1024 mb memory, is it worth it to do the upgrade?


#2

I think to put an AMD chip in a P-4 socket you need a special hammer…LOL


#3

[QUOTE=~Jethro~;2026576]I think to put an AMD chip in a P-4 socket you need a special hammer…LOL[/QUOTE]

Gotcha, a big DUH on me. Thanks, any ideas as what I could or should use for an upgrade?


#4

I would look at something like this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16813138103
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820211066
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103214
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16835186010

The above items will run around $150 plus shipping and deliver a decent amount of performance for the money spent. Also, the AMD X2 2.2 ghz CPUs can usually be over clocked to 2.6-2.8 ghz for an even better value quotient.


#5

[QUOTE=UTR;2026686]I would look at something like this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16813138103
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820211066
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819103214
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductReview.aspx?Item=N82E16835186010

The above items will run around $150 plus shipping and deliver a decent amount of performance for the money spent. Also, the AMD X2 2.2 ghz CPUs can usually be over clocked to 2.6-2.8 ghz for an even better value quotient.[/QUOTE]
I am assuming you mean to replace the mother board and start from scratch?, I never tried that before, had a backround as an old TV repairman, so have a basic knowledge of electronics, but not so much computer rebuilding, is this a very complicated procedure?


#6

[QUOTE=durkinjt;2026695]is this a very complicated procedure?[/QUOTE]No you just put it together is all. The more of them you build the more knowledge you gain. Plus you can pick out your case and add on if you want to. Emachines have proprietary parts that some can only be replaced by them :rolleyes:

I wish i had the money to build a few and sell them. Make money and have fun doing it :smiley:


#7

[QUOTE=Bob;2026701]No you just put it together is all. The more of them you build the more knowledge you gain. Plus you can pick out your case and add on if you want to. Emachines have proprietary parts that some can only be replaced by them :rolleyes:

I wish i had the money to build a few and sell them. Make money and have fun doing it :D[/QUOTE]

Yo bob-

Think that it would be almost impossible to build from scratch - at a price that - Dell or Gateway sell their ‘already mades’ for nowdays-eh!!


#8

[QUOTE=bigmike7;2026707]Yo bob-

Think that it would be almost impossible to build from scratch - at a price that - Dell or Gateway sell their ‘already mades’ for nowdays-eh!![/QUOTE]yeah Mike but do you really get what you want? I guess to each their own.

off topic sorry:

Hey, how’s your speakers holding up with that new receiver?


#9

[QUOTE=Bob;2026709]yeah Mike but do you really get what you want? I guess to each their own.

off topic sorry:

Hey, how’s your speakers holding up with that new receiver?[/QUOTE]Would either of you gent’s expound.?


#10

[QUOTE=Bob;2026701]No you just put it together is all. The more of them you build the more knowledge you gain. Plus you can pick out your case and add on if you want to. Emachines have proprietary parts that some can only be replaced by them :rolleyes:

I wish i had the money to build a few and sell them. Make money and have fun doing it :D[/QUOTE]
Bob, I asssume you like to build your own, rigs, I would be very interested into getting into the same. Any suggetions on getting started? I’m reasonably adept at electronic’s, but nowhere near an expert.
T.I.A.


#11

[QUOTE=durkinjt;2026695]I am assuming you mean to replace the mother board and start from scratch?, I never tried that before, had a backround as an old TV repairman, so have a basic knowledge of electronics, but not so much computer rebuilding, is this a very complicated procedure?[/QUOTE]

Building/upgrading a computer is really very easy if you have any degree of mechanical ability. Just don’t force anything to fit together. Every plug has a corresponding socket. My guess is that swapping out the motherboard would take you less than an hour. Then boot it up and install the drivers for the new hardware. I have built every computer for myself and for my business (and quite a few friends) for the past 17 years. Upgrading a computer is very much like changing parts on a vehicle except your hands don’t get greasy. :wink:


#12

yeah like UTR said. Everything just plugs in. Look around the net for some tips. Maybe you can find a friend to help you get started? I’m not as old as you but at close to 52 this old dog learned a few tricks.

I don’t know if my build pics would help you or not but the link is in my sig.

Up to you.


#13

[QUOTE=Bob;2026936]yeah like UTR said. Everything just plugs in. Look around the net for some tips. Maybe you can find a friend to help you get started? I’m not as old as you but at close to 52 this old dog learned a few tricks.

I don’t know if my build pics would help you or not but the link is in my sig.

Up to you.[/QUOTE]
Thanks Bob and all for the advise. I think I’m going to try to build from scratch. I’m retired now so I can take my time and do it carefully. I have a couple of older computers in my garage and have a work bench, I’ll probaly play with them for a while to get a better feel. I have done minor jobs, i.e., installing burners, cards, modems so I have a basic knowledge of the computer. Thanks again.


#14

Thanks Bob and all for the advise. I think I’m going to try to build from scratch. I’m retired now so I can take my time and do it carefully. I have a couple of older computers in my garage and have a work bench, I’ll probaly play with them for a while to get a better feel. I have done minor jobs, i.e., installing burners, cards, modems so I have a basic knowledge of the computer. Thanks again.

Then you are allready over half way there.Start taking those old ones apert and putting them back together,then start adding differant parts.Thats how I started.

bean55


#15

[QUOTE=bean55;2026993]Then you are allready over half way there.Start taking those old ones apert and putting them back together,then start adding differant parts.Thats how I started.

bean55[/QUOTE]
I was thinking about doing that, thanks for the reply, now I will go that route.


#16

[QUOTE=durkinjt;2026966]Thanks Bob and all for the advise. I think I’m going to try to build from scratch. I’m retired now so I can take my time and do it carefully. I have a couple of older computers in my garage and have a work bench, I’ll probaly play with them for a while to get a better feel. I have done minor jobs, i.e., installing burners, cards, modems so I have a basic knowledge of the computer. Thanks again.[/QUOTE]

If you have installed these type of components you list then you will have no problems putting a complete computer together. The great thing about building your own is that you know the quality of the parts used and repairing or upgrading later is very easy and economical.


#17

[QUOTE=UTR;2027017]If you have installed these type of components you list then you will have no problems putting a complete computer together. The great thing about building your own is that you know the quality of the parts used and repairing or upgrading later is very easy and economical.[/QUOTE]

Thanks.


#18

Your P4-519 can’t be more than a couple years old? But the mobo probably doesn’t support Core processors for you to upgrade only CPU and RAM?

Here’s what I did with my ~4 year old Packard Bell iXtreme (which I like for its clean white design and matching monitor), upgrading on a budget:

  • got a Foxconn i945GZ mATX mobo for 39,-
  • got 2x1GB Kingston DDR2-800 RAM for 42,-
  • did a straight swap in the PC and fitted a PentiumD 805 I had lying around.
  • updated mobo BIOS, which is now ready for Core Duo E2xxx or Core 2 Duo E4xxx.
  • am tempted by an E2220 for 76,- but will likely wait for E4xxx prices to drop well below 100,- in a couple months, when Penryn core takes over.
  • had a dual-boot on the HD, but my NTFS partition is now / (Linux root), (converted original / to /home and did a clean install, keeping all user data and settings without the need for any external backup).
  • ready for another 4 years of Internet fun, all prices in € (but everything’s cheaper in the U.S., so $ shouldn’t be too far off).

The crux of building is in the details, which only experience will teach you. :slight_smile:


#19

The first thing you always do, is go to the motherboard manufacturers website and find out the maximum amount of RAM, and the fastest CPU that is supported. When you buy a new motherboard, take note of the same thing.


#20

Moved to General Hardware forum.