Unicode enabeled or disabeled in DVD-V or A

vbimport

#1

I made a DVD-A with DiscWelder chrome and MLP Surcode.
I then used the content’s to build a new DVD-A iso in ImgBurn.
Only this time i also add a DATA folder in it with the original studio masters in it where i encoded the mlp files from.
After that i calculated it and imgburn automaticly detected it as a DVD-Audio i chosed yes to set the settings automaticly.
Only i used iso 9660:1999 (level x etc) and with succes everything seems ok and my dvd-a player plays it just fine.
Only after i made the iso i saw “dont disable unicode support in dvd-video” in the UDF settings and this was not checked.
Does this feature has nothing to do with dvd-a discs only for video ? And was it better that i used unicode support or will that break through the dvd-video specification (some players that dont read it).
Whats the most compatible checked or unchecked ? Does standard DVD-V disc have unicode support or is it like i said a non standard and lesser compatible setting ?
I need to know for sure if my image is fine since its a master disc for the pressing plant and i cant have any mistakes because they goin to press 500 copies of it. Any help is apreciated !


#2

The default ImgBurn settings are most compatible.

By the way, leaving that option unchecked means you didn’t allow Unicode. If you got no errors or warnings about file names being automatically changed, this option isn’t something you would worry about. (Standard DVD Video, DVD Audio, and BD Video discs don’t ever use Unicode file names.)

If it played fine on one player, it’s probably compliant with the standards, which means no problems on that front. Just make sure that (if the disc was actually authored in the DVD Audio format, that the players specifically support DVD-Audio; quite a few DVD players and such only support DVD Video, since that’s what most people buy DVDs for: to watch movies).


#3

[QUOTE=Albert;2757785]The default ImgBurn settings are most compatible.

By the way, leaving that option unchecked means you didn’t allow Unicode. If you got no errors or warnings about file names being automatically changed, this option isn’t something you would worry about. (Standard DVD Video, DVD Audio, and BD Video discs don’t ever use Unicode file names.)

If it played fine on one player, it’s probably compliant with the standards, which means no problems on that front. Just make sure that (if the disc was actually authored in the DVD Audio format, that the players specifically support DVD-Audio; quite a few DVD players and such only support DVD Video, since that’s what most people buy DVDs for: to watch movies).[/QUOTE]

The disc is universal so theres also a DVD-Video copy in the Video_TS folder in DTS Dolby format at the standard setting authored no video whatsoever only music in 16bit 44800, 1 chapter with 17 titles/songs also authored in discwelder. The audio_ts folder is of higher quality i converted the original masters in seperate channels to mlp (meridian lossless) and authored the dvd audio with discwelder and theres also a data folder as dvd rom directory with a original copy of the original masters in uncompressed flac same quality as the dvd-a so it act both as an archival medium and for people that do have acces on the dvd-audio part or in worst scenario only dvd video part (if people dont have have a computer for the flac files wich is very rare now a days) i know dvd-a is a dead format but there are still plenty of players that supports it but only very expensive ones. Thanks for clearing that up by the way then im glad i dont used the unicode support for it. Only the iso i used is 1999 so its also level x and i dont think thats standard normally but the dvd just plays fine in my blu ray player maybe old dvd players have problems with reading them or will it always read the udf system if it cant read the iso file system ? I dont know why dvd uses 2 file systems and if it uses both file systems for playing do you know that maybe why ?


#4

What 2 file systems are used?


#5

[QUOTE=Albert;2757825]What 2 file systems are used?[/QUOTE]

ImgBurn automaticly detected the it as a DVD-Audio and changed the standard settings for me however in the restrictions tab in ISO it was still set up with the latest update :1999 so with level x, long file names, ASCI support etc and ofcourse UDF 1.02 as standard for dvd without unicode support enabled like the dvd-v and a specification only i think iso with level x etc is normally not used for dvd video or audio but it still plays fine in my blu ray player, pc drives and tested it on a old dvd player works all like a charm. So if the 1999 ISO setting really isnt that compatible then i think i already would have problems playing them unless it just only reads the udf system if it cant read the iso file system. I dont know if players uses both file systems when playback or just the one that is supported. Also i did not had warnings of file names so unicode support was not something i need to worry about and since manufactured dvd’s dont use unicode support to then im glad i did not used it. Hope you can clear this up the more i learn the better :smiley: thanks in advance.


#6

I’ll let Wikipedia answer one question:

Almost all DVD-Video discs use the UDF bridge format, which is a combination of the DVD MicroUDF (a subset of UDF 1.02) and ISO 9660 file systems. The UDF bridge format provides backwards compatibility for operating systems that support only ISO 9660. Most DVD players read the UDF filesystem from a DVD-Video disc and ignore the ISO9660 filesystem.
from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-Video

So to reiterate the point, and because I’m sure someone’s mentioned this to you before, the device reading the disc (computer, DVD player, etc) uses the best/most preferred file system available on the disc. Why would it bother to read file information from both file systems? :wink:

To quote you in your above post:

So if the 1999 ISO setting really isnt that compatible then i think i already would have problems playing them unless it just only reads the udf system if it cant read the iso file system.

…given that devices are going to use the UDF file system info to read the disc, you wouldn’t know if the ISO 9660 settings you apply will cause a problem on systems that don’t read UDF.

But no, :1999 isn’t supported when a DVD-Video (or DVD-Audio) playback device has to read the ISO 9660 file system. Most systems that CAN read :1999 also read UDF, so there’s no reason to worry about those settings. Leave them be…or change them to whatever you want. Turn :1999 off and see if ImgBurn complains when you add your extra files.