Unable to use full capacity of an old CD-RW anymore

vbimport

#1

I have this old 4x CD-RW here (TDK) which I am unable to erase to its full capacity anymore, or actually I don’t know whether it gets erased to its maximum…

I’m using ImgBurn 2.2.0.0 for all burning and authoring, and the status window at the right side of the main window says the following about this CD-RW:

_NEC DVD_RW ND-3500AG 2.1B (ATA)
Current Profile: CD-RW

Disc Information:
Status: Empty
Erasable: Yes
Free Sectors: 359.847
Free Space: 736.966.656 bytes
Free Time: 79:59:72 (MM:SS:FF)
Supported Write Speeds: 4x

ATIP Information:
Start Time of LeadIn (MID): 97m10s0f
Last Possible Start Time of LeadOut: 79m59s74f

Now here it says the disc has a max capacity of ~703MB.
But the last part of the log is puzzling:

Current Format Capacity:
Sectors: 295.232
Size: 604.635.136 bytes
Time: 65:38:32 (MM:SS:FF)

Preferred Format Capacity:
Sectors: 295.232
Size: 604.635.136 bytes
Time: 65:38:32 (MM:SS:FF)

Maximum Format Capacity:
Sectors: 295.232
Size: 604.635.136 bytes
Time: 65:38:32 (MM:SS:FF)

That’s only ~577MB! Is this because the disc has a bad sector at 295.233 (and following)? Or maybe didn’t ImgBurn erase the disc correctly?

I’m able to burn bigger images to the CD-RW than the format capacity tells me, but when verifying I get a weird error message… verify failed, but the controller didn’t notice an error or something like that. Sorry, got no log at the moment it’s one of those ATAPI error windows with a lot of opcode in it.

So is this what happens when a CD-RW goes bad: I can still use some of its capacity?


#2

I would do a complete format using imgburn, then scan the whole disc for errors.

You have used packet writing like InCd on the disc??


#3

I already did a “full erase” with no luck. And no I haven’t used any packet writing software whatsoever.


#4

Here’s a log from the status view of a different (newer) CD-RW (TDK, 4x-12x):

_NEC DVD_RW ND-3500AG 2.1B (ATA)
Current Profile: CD-RW

Disc Information:
Status: Complete
Erasable: Yes
Sessions: 1
Sectors: 353.165
Size: 723.281.920 bytes
Time: 78:30:65 (MM:SS:FF)
Supported Write Speeds: 10x

TOC Information:
Session 1...
-> Track 01  (Mode 1, LBA: 0 - 353162)
-> LeadOut  (LBA: 353165)

ATIP Information:
Start Time of LeadIn (MID): 97m17s1f
Last Possible Start Time of LeadOut: 79m59s74f

Current Format Capacity:
Sectors: 353.165
Size: 723.281.920 bytes
Time: 78:30:65 (MM:SS:FF)

Preferred Format Capacity:
Sectors: 295.232
Size: 604.635.136 bytes
Time: 65:38:32 (MM:SS:FF)

Maximum Format Capacity:
Sectors: 353.165
Size: 723.281.920 bytes
Time: 78:30:65 (MM:SS:FF)

What’s interesting to me is the “Preferred Format Capacity”. It shows the same capacity as with the older CD-RW…

Does anyone know what is actually meant by “Current/Preferred/Maximum Format Capacity”? (Especially the “preferred” format…)


#5

The Preferred Format Capacity term can only be found in an ImgBurn changelog:

“Added/Changed: ‘Preferred Format Capacity’ value to info window for rewritable media. This value is now used during full erase rather than the maximum one.”

:eek:

In this case, it must have been ImgBurn not erasing the CD-RW correctly. A bug, or actually an intended design flaw?

Try erasing with Nero CD-DVD Speed. :wink:


#6

:iagree:


#7

Of course! I should have looked in the change log. Thanks for this info. :flower:

Unfortunately that doesn’t work. Doing a [U]full[/U] erase with CD-DVD Speed doesn’t tell me much about the actual capacity being used for erasing either (format button is greyed out btw). I only see a percentage gauge.

Then verifying a burnt image with ImgBurn afterwards gives me the same errors again.

I’m gonna send a bug report/“feature change request” to LightningUK! :cop: My guess is that “Preferred Format Capacity” is being calculated incorrectly.

Until it gets fixed one simply mustn’t use ImgBurn’s full erase. Quick erase is still ok. :iagree: Still it puzzles me that other apps aren’t able to erase to the real capacity anymore either.

But there’s still another possibility: the disc has simply gone bad.