Ultra power zoom digicams that can shoot .tif as well as .jpg

In light of my sony camera problem, if I cannot get it fixed, I will have to get myself another camera, I have liked the ultra /power zoom cameras, because I do not have to carry around bulky removable lenses that DSLRs have, & I also like to shoot video, so the power zoom allowed me to have both in one product, where as a DSLR does not shoot video & I would have to lug around 2 different items for the these purposes.

If I get another power zoom, in I mean a digicam with a 10x or bigger optical zoom, I would like one that can shoot .tiffs & raw files as well as .jpgs, I shoot photos of my artwork & need something of reasonable quality. For artwork or other important items I need good documentary photos, I have used my film SLR & shot slides, & scanned the slides for .tiffs, but it would be nice to have a camera that could shoot better quality than just .jpgs.

Added to all this I am on a budget & cannot afford a $1000 + DSLR kit right now.

Dpreview has a nice review of 7 super-zoom cameras which retail between $250 and $350, all compared against each other, which can be read here. The review covers image and lens quality, video cabilities, ability to shoot indoors and any specific issues they came across with each camera.

I would suggest looking for RAW over TIFF if you see a camera with one choice or the other. Basically, a RAW file contains unprocessed sensor information, much like a negative from a film camera, so you have full control over processing it on a PC, including colour balance, noise reduction and a certain degree of exposure control. When a camera stores a TIFF, it carries out its image processing (noise reduction, white balance, etc.) before creating the TIFF file, so even though it is not compressed like a JPEG file, this post processing still results in less detail being retained than what would be stored in a RAW file, especially if highlights are clipped or if the camera’s noise reduction ended up removing some detail.

[QUOTE=Seán;2295388]Dpreview has a nice review of 7 super-zoom cameras which retail between $250 and $350, all compared against each other, which can be read here. The review covers image and lens quality, video cabilities, ability to shoot indoors and any specific issues they came across with each camera.

I would suggest looking for RAW over TIFF if you see a camera with one choice or the other. Basically, a RAW file contains unprocessed sensor information, much like a negative from a film camera, so you have full control over processing it on a PC, including colour balance, noise reduction and a certain degree of exposure control. When a camera stores a TIFF, it carries out its image processing (noise reduction, white balance, etc.) before creating the TIFF file, so even though it is not compressed like a JPEG file, this post processing still results in less detail being retained than what would be stored in a RAW file, especially if highlights are clipped or if the camera’s noise reduction ended up removing some detail.[/QUOTE]

I found a superzoom camera that shoots RAW; The Fujifinepix S9000 or S9500 in Europe, have you heard or seen of this particular camera? If you have do you know if it has Adobe RGB color space available on it? most point & shoots only have sRGB. I have looked at its manual online & at some reviews, but none of them specify the color space it uses.

Among the things I would like this camera to do that I already listed, I shoot photos of my artwork, so I would like something that can do this as well.

I’ve some info posted in this other post.

It has been a while since I used a Fujifilm super-zoom, however, going by the specification, it appears to be a very decent camera. It has a 1/1.6", which is much larger than the 1/2.3" sensor used on most super-zooms, so it should have pretty good low light performance and at higher ISO ratings. Unfortunately, it does not have optical image stabilisation, which was not that common at the time this camera was released (mid 2005). For video, it captures at up to 640x480 @ 30fps.

As I mentioned in the other post, Fujifilm does not offer Adobe RGB as a colour space option, so if you need this colour space, you will need to shoot in RAW and choose Adobe RGB in the RAW conversion.

You might want to consider getting a used DSLR camera body. DSLRs have new models coming out all the time which makes for very good deals on used ones. Then you can get a reasonably priced lens, or a used lens, and have a much more capable camera. A good site for used equipment and for photography information, in general, is http://www.fredmiranda.com/. I recently bought a Canon XTi camera body from their [I]Buy & Sell [/I]forum as a backup to our other equipment and paid $300 for it and it had very low usage. If you add a Sigma 17-70mm, 18-125mm or 18-200mm lens to this and you will have a very nice rig for a variety of shooting situations. Plus it would be expandable to meet whatever needs you have in the future.

One of the best P&S superzooms, IMO, is this one from Canon: http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelInfoAct&fcategoryid=144&modelid=18301

One thing I never thought of mentioning earlier is that the Imaging Resource website has a very nice image comparison tool between various cameras and various ISO modes, all of the same static scene containing various objects and textures. While this won’t show how effective a camera’s zoom quality or image stabilisation capability is, it does give an idea of what the camera’s image sensor resolving power is like, which would be important in your case.