Ultra HD TVs consume 30% more energy on average – HDR feature uses up to 47% more power per movie

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Ultra HD TVs consume 30% more energy on average – HDR feature uses up to 47% more power per movie[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/04/myce-samsung-full-hd-ultra-hd-tv-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

The United States Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) reports that if all Americans would switch to Ultra HD TVs, U.S. viewers’ annual utility bills would be $1 billion higher. The NRDC calls for TV manufacturers to make more energy-saving improvements.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/ultra-hd-tvs-consume-30-more-energy-on-average-hdr-feature-uses-up-to-47-more-power-per-movie-77818/](http://www.myce.com/news/ultra-hd-tvs-consume-30-more-energy-on-average-hdr-feature-uses-up-to-47-more-power-per-movie-77818/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Testing showed the HDR version of a movie used 47 percent more power than the same title in 4K format.
I don’t see support for that statement in the linked article.


#3

Nevermind. My comment was based on a misunderstanding.


#4

30% more power on average?
Considering what the TV is actually doing, that’s not too bad.
While a 4K TV doesn’t require any more light to display a picture it is
switching on and off 4 times the number of pixels and passing 4 times
the amount of data through the system. Higher processing requirements,
more ram to refresh, it all adds up.

Don’t care how much power the “Automatic Brightness Control” saves, it’s
the most annoying feature on today’s TV’s and I always shut it off. When on,
most TV’s brighten and dim more than your annoying neighbor’s blinking
Christmas lights.


#5

Yep, who cares, my old Zenith tube sets used to pull 400 watts and heat a small house.
New led sets draw a lot less power so 30 percent more of not much isn’t going to make a big difference in my electric bill.
And I agree on the auto brightness thing, I always turn it off as well and set tends to look better and not bounce up and down in the brightness.


#6

@CDan, it was in the press release (per email)

The new High Dynamic Range, or HDR, feature that provides brighter colors and deeper shadows could significantly increase national TV energy consumption. Our
testing showed the HDR version of a movie used 47 percent more power than the same title in 4K format. More attention is needed to understand HDR energy use
and reduce it.