Ultra HD Blu-ray standard now completed – first products available this year

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Ultra HD Blu-ray standard now completed – first products available this year[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/05/ultra-hd-blu-ray-logo-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

The Blu-ray Disc Association has announced it has completed the standard for Ultra HD Blu-ray discs. At the end of this year the first players and discs should become available.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/ultra-hd-blu-ray-standard-now-completed-first-products-available-this-year-76036/](http://www.myce.com/news/ultra-hd-blu-ray-standard-now-completed-first-products-available-this-year-76036/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

Needless to say, they’re going to use more sophisticated DRM which will have a much greater amount of anti-user/owner abuse. Soon we’ll be hearing non-sense like “you played this movie twice, but only bought one copy… therefore you’re a pirate, and you’re killing the industry!”, or "How dare you watch this movie with friends, who (we assume) don’t own their own copies. You dirty thieves!"Â And yet, people will mindlessly flock over their stores looking for Ultra HD players without giving any thought as to what freedoms the higher resolution will steel from them. They’ll simply be convinced by “their eyes” (that is, the power of suggestion) that the video is much sharper, and the movements are much smoother.


#3

Whether they realize it or not, it is in their best interest to get players and content out to the consumer fast and reasonably priced. If they don’t the pirate community will fill the void with consumers by illegal downloading.


#4

didn’t see any mention of when and how much the players will be. what i read recently reckons they will be pretty expensive and out of reach of a lot of people. the biggest problem for the industry, however, will be if they try to pursue yet again this ‘only rented the disk, not bought it. can only play it once, on one piece of equipment and no one else allowed to be in the room with you!’ getting well past a joke now. about time governments went the other way and told the industries what is gonna happen. considering how little they actually put into a country’s economy, they should be glad of all those who do buy the content and players!


#5

At the end of the day, the consumers will dictate to the music and movie industry what business model they will follow. Just as the consumer is dictating to the television industry that low cost, on-demand programming is the future of TV.


#6

These players only make sense having an UHD TV and since there is very little UHD broadcast - the idea is dead before being born… No one pays for UHD data usage at least in Australia.


#7

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2753925]Needless to say, they’re going to use more sophisticated DRM which will have a much greater amount of anti-user/owner abuse. Soon we’ll be hearing non-sense like “you played this movie twice, but only bought one copy… therefore you’re a pirate, and you’re killing the industry!”, or "How dare you watch this movie with friends, who (we assume) don’t own their own copies. You dirty thieves!"Â And yet, people will mindlessly flock over their stores looking for Ultra HD players without giving any thought as to what freedoms the higher resolution will steel from them. They’ll simply be convinced by “their eyes” (that is, the power of suggestion) that the video is much sharper, and the movements are much smoother.[/QUOTE]

Actually it won’t be that long before TVs can tell how many people are watching as they can already tell if anyone is in front of the screen.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#8

[QUOTE=Wombler;2753955]Actually it won’t be that long before TVs can tell how many people are watching as they can already tell if anyone is in front of the screen.

[B]Wombler[/B][/QUOTE]

Not if they are too busy recording our private conversations.

It seems 1984 is coming.


#9

I realise things must improve over time, but is it really an improvement? I find watching in a good quality stand def is fine, then when I first look at a Blu ray, yeah, it’s better, well for a while, then I don’t really notice. Go to UHD and everything looks slightly plastic or like CG.
I’m not the only one to notice this effect, it’s on different TVs as well, so it’s not just my setup. How “good” does it need to be? if everything was say in 8K or more, perhaps going back to SD would look horrible, maybe even 1080P? Just like going back to VHS.
What ever, I have no plans to by a super restricted possibly peeping tom of a UHD Blu ray player, what I have is more than good enough, well for me that is.
What do you Guys think?


#10

Apart from watching 4K close-up similar to sitting in front of a PC screen, I don’t think most will be able to tell much difference between 1080p and 4K unless they either have a very large (>60") TV and incredibly sharp eyesight. Even then, I’m sure most people can’t even see the full 1080p resolution either of their existing TV from the sofa.

If your PC screen resolution is 1920x1080, a simple test is open up “Computer” full screen an take a screenshot. Save it as a JPEG on a USB stick, plug it in your TV and display that image. Now, sit on the sofa and see if you can read the various location/drive names down the left column or even the date/time shown at the bottom-right of the image. If not, then obviously you’re not even seeing full 1080p and probably barely 720p also. :slight_smile:

Even my friend who does wedding videos is surprised at just how many people don’t realise that DVD is not even HD. He said that many of his customers specifically ask to have their wedding filmed in Full HD and when he asks if they would like it on Blu-ray disc or USB stick, the customer says “DVD is fine”. :wink:


#11

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2754001]I realise things must improve over time, but is it really an improvement? I find watching in a good quality stand def is fine, then when I first look at a Blu ray, yeah, it’s better, well for a while, then I don’t really notice. Go to UHD and everything looks slightly plastic or like CG.
I’m not the only one to notice this effect, it’s on different TVs as well, so it’s not just my setup. How “good” does it need to be? if everything was say in 8K or more, perhaps going back to SD would look horrible, maybe even 1080P? Just like going back to VHS.
What ever, I have no plans to by a super restricted possibly peeping tom of a UHD Blu ray player, what I have is more than good enough, well for me that is.
What do you Guys think?[/QUOTE]

The law of diminishing returns certainly comes into play with ever increasing resolutions but I think the ultimate limit is what the human eye can perceive.

Once they reach that then there’s no point in going any further.

I have to say I’m a big fan of HD though as the difference I can see is really dramatic.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#12

I’m looking forward to Ultra HD / UHD / 4K / Blu-ray 2 / etc…

However, if Cinavia is the primary DRM then this format is dead to me. If it will be on selected movies then I will just avoid purchasing those movies.

Vote with your wallet, kids. :slight_smile:


#13

I was pretty enthusiastic when HD first came out.  It came hand in hand with a giant leap in TV technology.  All of a sudden we had bigger/better flatscreen TV’s (LCD’s, Plasma’s etc…).   HDTV/Bluray came hand in hand with that leap in technology.  HD looks so good on modern tv’s. Â

I don’t feel the same way about 4k.   My 1080p TV is nearing 8 years old (it’s an LG LCD and it won’t die).  It’s only 42" and we’ve been thinking about replacing it.  We only have so much room in the living room.   I don’t think we’d fit a TV bigger than 60 or 65" in the room we have.   We sit about 10’ away from the TV.  From what I’ve read and understand there’s not a lot of benefit of a 4k tv in that environment.  That far away you would need an 80" TV or bigger to start benefiting from 4k.Â

I can’t be the only one that has a finite amount of space in their living room to allocate to the TV.   For there to be a massive spread and sales boom on 4k tv’s i think you would need it to go hand in hand with people wanting big large screen tv’s.   Really big TV’s.  I can see it being a niche product but not mainstream (obviously there’s going to be an enthusiastic portion of the planet that jumps all over it).  This seems like 3d to me.  The HD boom cause a huge spike in TV sales.   It’s was the biggest thing to happen since B&W to Colour happened.   It seems they want to replicate those sales.  They keep coming up with new formats (3d, 4k) in order to try and spark another tv boom.

I think 1080p is good enough for the masses.  In regards to 4k bluray.   I love bluray but I’m quickly becoming the minority (I’m the only one I know who has a bluray collection).   If optical sales are down what are the odds of them successfully launching a new format?


#14

[QUOTE=Zod;2754103]That far away you would need an 80" TV or bigger to start benefiting from 4k.[/QUOTE]

Not true. UHD TVs bring faster framerates, better colour, and more contrast. Have you seen one yet? It blew my mind. It was a “Shut up and take my money” moment.

[QUOTE=Zod;2754103]This seems like 3d to me.[/QUOTE]

UHD is [B][U]FAR[/U][/B] from the desperate train wreck that is 3D. It can be enjoyed without expensive glasses and won’t give you headaches.

[QUOTE=Zod;2754103]I love bluray but I’m quickly becoming the minority (I’m the only one I know who has a bluray collection). If optical sales are down what are the odds of them successfully launching a new format?[/QUOTE]

I’m still an optical purchaser. My guess is there are still many of us who prefer having hundreds of movies all lined up neatly on a shelf. That being said, this will probably be my last optical format. I just can’t see it getting any better than UHD.