Ultra HD Blu-ray discs on sale early

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Ultra HD Blu-ray discs on sale early[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/02/UltraHD-Bluray-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]
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Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/ultra-hd-blu-ray-discs-on-sale-early-78636/

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#2

Good news. Also, initial pricing seems better than it was with 1080p. Once the early adopters get fleeced the prices should start falling. IMO, 4k is going to take off much faster than 1080p did since pricing seems far more reasonable.


#3

I only buy movies when they are priced well unless its one I just have to have so it took me a while to buy any HD movies once all the deals between HD DVD and Blu Ray were done. I have both HD players and disks now but no UHD TV yet. I bet the players will come down in price quickly and the disks will stabilize on sale at like 10 to 15 bucks like they do for some new movies to generate sales. I refuse to pay 30 bucks when I can wait and get them for 5 or 10, with everything most times.


#4

Now the kick in the nuts…

You will need a television screen with 4k resolution to take full advantage of the new format
Of which most will have to decide … Food or TV? Not everyone can and will be able to go that route…


#5

Well I haven’t bought one yet, but my lil sisters hubby gave us their 2 year old 50" Sony LED flat screen when he updated to a UHD Sony and of course I WANT to get one but have to wait for a good deal and the money first.
Not sure if I want to blow my tax refund on a TV, the last two went towards a new washer and dryer each year as we needed a upgrade to something that doesn’t waste water or electricity to save on bills.
The Vizio sets are highly reviewed and go on sale a lot so might get one of those soon if I decide I can afford it:bigsmile:
The up-conversion on sisters Sony set looks really nice anyways so even if you don’t have any UHD stuff it’s still pretty close to UHD with HD sources.


#6

I’m not ready to jump in.  I was all over HD, HD DVD, and Bluray’s when they all came out.  I loved the big leap in technology from SD Tube TV’s to Bigger Screen HD LCDs/Plasmas.  The leap in video quality really benefitted from the big leap in TV technology.

You still need a pretty big TV to benefit from 4k (Assuming you don’t sit a few feet directly in front of the tv).  I have a 60" 1080p that we sit about 13ft away from.  It’s about the biggest size TV I would want to put in my living room.   To get decent advantage of 4k I would need a TV over 80".Â

Unlike 1080p, I feel like the benefits of jumping to 4k are limited.  Blurays look fantastic on my setup (not like dvd’s did on HD screens).   For 4k to take off you need it to provide a benefit to most people.  I guess TV’s will become 4k by default, but when comparing bluray vs uhd on sub 80" screens, will people see a noticeable difference that causes them to once again rebuy their movie catalogs?


#7

I recently got a 4k computer monitor for my work station. The resolution is only one component of the improvements relating to 4k. The improvement with color graduations are very noticeable to me. I now see so many more shades of all colors and this has about as much impact as the resolution increase. Add to this the IPS screen and the color accuracy and clarity of it all makes a nice improvement in this area.

What will determine when I move to a 4k TV will be when content is readily available through disc purchase, streaming and cable TV service. Also, upscaling quality will play a roll along with the type of panels that are available and at what price point.

One issue I have found with using a 4k computer monitor is that older programs do not always run well in 4k. They were not written to scale icons, text etc in 4k and using Windows to override this is not possible in some cases. So anyone looking to move to a 4k monitor needs to take this into consideration.


#8

[QUOTE=UTR;2768670]I recently got a 4k computer monitor for my work station. The resolution is only one component of the improvements relating to 4k. The improvement with color graduations are very noticeable to me. I now see so many more shades of all colors and this has about as much impact as the resolution increase. Add to this the IPS screen and the color accuracy and clarity of it all makes a nice improvement in this area.

What will determine when I move to a 4k TV will be when content is readily available through disc purchase, streaming and cable TV service. Also, upscaling quality will play a roll along with the type of panels that are available and at what price point.

One issue I have found with using a 4k computer monitor is that older programs do not always run well in 4k. They were not written to scale icons, text etc in 4k and using Windows to override this is not possible in some cases. So anyone looking to move to a 4k monitor needs to take this into consideration.[/QUOTE]That’s the problem that is only one part of the bigger picturePun. And it’s true some can’t play at 4K so does that mean they will have to re-buy all the same movies again at higher prices? There comes a cost and if one doesn’t think it through they are in for a rude awakening in the cost to go 4K or 8K entertainment.


#9

[QUOTE=coolcolors;2768672]That’s the problem that is only one part of the bigger picturePun. And it’s true some can’t play at 4K so does that mean they will have to re-buy all the same movies again at higher prices? There comes a cost and if one doesn’t think it through they are in for a rude awakening in the cost to go 4K or 8K entertainment.[/QUOTE]

Most of the programs scale fine in 4k. It seems that there are some programs that do not use, or allow, Windows scaling to take over their interface. The text and icons in these programs are 1/4 the size on the screen that they would be at 1080p. None of the movies I have tried have an issue at 4k.


#10

Running a 4K Dell monitor here, and I can echo what UTR says. The 10bit colour per plane does make quite a difference to the accuracy of the colour. On Win10 DPi scaling works extremely well, and there is an Win 10 update coming which is said to improve DPI scaling even more.

The great thing is, you have DPI scaling on your applications, and when you view a video, you get the gorgeous native 4K resolution.

However, I don’t see me buying an UHD player any time soon. That will need to wait until we buy a 4K TV.


#11

[QUOTE=UTR;2768681]Most of the programs scale fine in 4k. It seems that there are some programs that do not use, or allow, Windows scaling to take over their interface. The text and icons in these programs are 1/4 the size on the screen that they would be at 1080p. None of the movies I have tried have an issue at 4k.[/QUOTE]
Computer and monitor and GPU are better setup but your everyday TV and player probably aren’t up to snuff to do it. And that is where you get into trouble when watch on TV not your computer.