Ultimate Cinavia Guide: The protection that refuses to be silenced

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following article: Utimate Cinavia Guide: The protection that refuses to be silenced[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2013/07/cinavia-myce-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

Cinavia is a copy protection that has been introduced to all recent Blu-ray players and prevents you from playing personal backups. In this article we discuss what it does, how it works, and what you can do to bypass it.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/article/cinavia-the-copy-protection-that-doesnt-want-to-be-silenced-68001/](http://www.myce.com/article/cinavia-the-copy-protection-that-doesnt-want-to-be-silenced-68001/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

You neglected to mention that thus far ONLY Sony studios and distribution companies are using Cinavia protection. Cinavia is very expensive for a studio to use, requiring a huge investment in proprietary hardware and licensing, as well as additional licensing fees per release and even per disc. Most studios are refusing to use it because of the costs, and they will continue to do so unless Sony can prove that it saves money in the end.


#3

The list of movies with Cinavia that DVDFab compiled a while back includes titles from Warner Brothers, Universal Studios, Disney and 20th Century Fox. All of these are major studios, not just distribution companies. Of course, there are very few movies from anyone besides Sony Pictures that have Cinavia, and it looks like the others are simply testing the waters so far.

The list can be seen here: http://blog.dvdfab.com/cinavia-protection.html


#4

That list is too old to be useful. There were initially a few releases from other studios that were “sponsored” by Verance - the company that sells Cinavia hardware, software and licensing. A number of other releases may have multiple studios associated with them, but are distributed by Sony Entertainment. Disney and CBS/Fox are examples. IOW, Sony is paying the costs for the Cinavia.


#5

Whatever the current or most timely list is, the presence as part of AACS means it can be installed from that point forward. This also means “We The Monopoly have the means to force our Will upon you, the consumer, regardless of your purchasing choices - we eliminate choices so you have only one.”

Newspeak. In action.


#6

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2693515]Whatever the current or most timely list is, the presence as part of AACS means it can be installed from that point forward. This also means “We The Monopoly have the means to force our Will upon you, the consumer, regardless of your purchasing choices - we eliminate choices so you have only one.”

Newspeak. In action.[/QUOTE]

The only devices that are immune to it are earlier generation Blu-ray players.

They don’t have the processing power to be able to support Cinavia.

I have a Sony BDP-550 and it can’t support Cinavia so the firmware updates have never included it.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#7

Point being that over-all, Cinavia is a small annoyance rather than the end of the world. Only a minority of releases are affected, and there are ways to get around those as well. Even among BD players that support Cinavia detection, many still ignore the watermark in MKV and M2TS files and only observe it in BD folder structures or on BD discs that lack AACS encryption.

I suspect that the BDA player licensing only requires Cinavia detection in the above conditions, but that’s not something they will admit. The only major class of players that has had Cinavia detection added via firmware updating is the PS3. That’s also the only player that routinely detects Cinavia in media files.


#8

So the answer is … instead of buying a bluray player & purchasing authentic bluray disc’s that your children tend to chew on … But a cheap Android/apple tv, and download your movies, either legally or illegally …

I’m not sure why corporations are waging war on their customers … It’s corporate suicide.


#9

Wasn’t the only player that worked with the DVDFab work around the PS3 and Sony closed that loophole a long time ago.
Also the AnyDVD patch doesn’t work on the latest build of TMT 6 and is a bit hit and miss with PDVD 12


#10

[QUOTE=Adbear;2694091]Wasn’t the only player that worked with the DVDFab work around the PS3 and Sony closed that loophole a long time ago.
Also the AnyDVD patch doesn’t work on the latest build of TMT 6 and is a bit hit and miss with PDVD 12[/QUOTE]

It wasn’t just the PS3, other standalone players that support BDMV can play them too.

They’re predominantly Sony machines though.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#11

Does anyone have any positive feedback about the process of “Converting Conversions”? That is, taking a file, converting it to one format, and then converting that conversion to another format?

Has anyone ever had a completely positive, 100% perfect experience with that?

I’ve always detected a lessening-of-quality.

I bring this up because the BluRay will be replaced with some successor. BD2, we can call it. Sony & Co will probably still try to embed - or at least license (ie, make money from) - a Cinavia-compliant player. “Sure, we’ll sell you the license to embed this so old BluRay Discs with Cinavia can be played, just like 1999 CDs can still be played.”

That’s BD2.

What about BD3, though? The successor-to-the-BD Successor?

By installing filters, DRMs, Cinavia and whatever other crap these companies license (and PAY to license), each generation of media (downloaded, streamed, whatever) will always be converted and re-converted and re-re-converted.

Maybe one of the big future industries will be Janitorial Services. Er, I mean, “re-mastering”. Cleaning off the crap, swabbing the decks, shining the brass, getting the original media to sparkle and shine ‘like new’. They’ll call it remastering. But it’s still janitorial. And all of these Crap Embeds will need to be cleaned out at some point.

A lot of money is being spent to embed this crap in this stuff. A lot more will be spent cleaning it out. Something tells me “Sony Janitorial Services” has a long, LONG life.

I wish the Artists & Rightsholders would figure out that, in a world of dwindling profits (well, according to Warehouses and Distributors), all of these paying-of-licenses dismember profits even more. “Just stop with all the crap and give folks a good product for a better price!”

A LOT of artists made huge fortunes off of albums that cost $3.98

Of course, tens of thousands of millionaires made their fortunes when petrol was 23.9 a gallon, too.


#12

Gosh I hope sony doesn’t have anything to do with “BD2”.
They made Blu-ray unnecessarily complex (expensive) almost to the point it is not fit for public consumption (that is A/V editing and creation)…not to mention the fact that the BD blank industry is an over-priced bad joke…hope that 50pc melody I bought for 26.00 works ok…(fingers crossed)…


#13

Steve, yes. There are two factors that prevent me from wanting to deal with BluRays - the fineness of the laser demands such an ultra-clean Read Surface that this creates a doubtfulness of any disk’s longevity simply due to use and re-use. AND that the BD Blanks industry suffers from such quality variances - and the public perception is that most of those variances go downhill - “worser and worser”.

Sadly, since I champion “capacity is important” and I want some kind of burner device as part of my computer services, I can’t recommend any superior options. Can BluRay start using CorningWare sheet-diamonds instead, AND do it at 25-cents per disk?!!

Do that and perhaps I wouldn’t even wonder if it makes Windows 50% faster!


#14

Yeah, I didn’t mind that price for the melodys but going prices for the dual layer…they are kidding right?..
I haven’t burned but about 15 blu-rays this year, this pack will last me a long time.
Hard drives/flash drives are fine for me.


#15

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2694115]Does anyone have any positive feedback about the process of “Converting Conversions”? That is, taking a file, converting it to one format, and then converting that conversion to another format?

Has anyone ever had a completely positive, 100% perfect experience with that?

I’ve always detected a lessening-of-quality…

[/QUOTE]

Yes, I’ve done “conversions of conversions” that are really quite good. For example, taking an xvid avi copy of a dvd and converting that to H264. But it really helps to have excellent material to begin with. In this example, dvd-video as the starting point, the original video can be any level imaginable. I’ve seen commercially made dvd video that looked as bad as VHS. And I’ve seen some that can come close to rivaling an average commercially made blu ray.

My conversion went from a ~5gb dvd video, to 2.2gb xvid down to 1.2gb H264 and it is still quite good. Better to start with the dvd of course, or from a blu ray source, but using x264 in two passes or CQ of 18-20, you’ll be surprised at the quality that is possible. And H265/HEVC is promising even greater compression.


#16

Kerry, you need those 80-inch 8K TVs to cover your walls and talk about Quality of Conversions! ha ha…

Honestly, though, I remain concerned about what BD#3 will do to the media industry. I’m sure BD#2 - the successor - will certainly support BD and all of the crap-filters loaded into it.

When will DVD Support erode? It will at some point. Will there be a revolutionary new media (orbs?!! - “They can carry 80 kajillion DVDs!”) or maybe a vial of pixie dust (er, crystals)? “Darn - pixie-lated still-!!”

Hopefully, SATA27 will solve those “80 kajillion DVD” transfer times. Fifty percent faster!! (Whoopee - it only take a YEAR now!!)


#17

customers actually buy movies


#18

“Unbreakable” Cinavia is now history, because it is now shown that Cinavia can be effectively rendered undetectable with no audio quality degradation. Read more recent news near the end of Nov., 2013:


#19

I suspect that the BDA player licensing only requires Cinavia detection in the above conditions, but that’s not something they will admit. The only major class of players that has had Cinavia detection added via firmware updating is the PS3.


#20

[QUOTE=lyoncau;2713315]I suspect that the BDA player licensing only requires Cinavia detection in the above conditions, but that’s not something they will admit. The only major class of players that has had Cinavia detection added via firmware updating is the PS3.
[/QUOTE]

Not sure what you mean by “major class” but Sony also updated any of their standalone players, that were capable of running Cinavia, by firmware updates.

The reason the number of models secured this way is relatively small though is that a large proportion of older players don’t have the processing power to be able to run Cinavia and will therefore never support this.

There were a few models just prior to Cinavia’s integration with AACS that were capable though.

Here’s an example.

The Sony BDP-580 was released in March 2011 prior to the introduction of Cinavia.

[B]Wombler[/B]