UK goverment rejects call for ban on DRM

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article UK goverment rejects call for ban on DRM.

Despite a total of 1,414 signing an online petition on the UK government’s e-petition website calling for the outlawing of Digital Rights Management (DRM), the UK government has rejected the call for…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/13024-UK-goverment-rejects-call-for-ban-on-DRM.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/13024-UK-goverment-rejects-call-for-ban-on-DRM.html)

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Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

“could weaken consumer rights”? It DOES weaken consumer rights. :r


#3

Not unsurprising reaction given that it has ignored 1 million times that effort by motorists voting no on another website. In today’s new century , the consumer has been reduced to the level of the cash cow to fund the mega corporations lust and greed , which because of the sheer size and reach can operate independent of any government or controlling laws , and routinely bribe all politicians to introduce illogical and repressive controlling laws that suit their own interests above all else! What a sad century this has become already , to be sold out for one cent in the dollar by our own politicians ! :c


#4

Governments are held to ransom by greedy corporations who have a vested interest in screwing the consumer.


#5

… not a suprise considering the British government have been brown nosing Bill for years !! :r


#6

Please get the facts correct here. The news.com article, and the one above, completely miss the purpose of the petition. This petition had nothing to do with DRM. The text of the petition clearly states “we the undersigned petition the Prime Minister to create a new exception to copyright law that gives individuals the right to create a private copy of copyrighted materials for their own personal use, including back-ups, archiving and shifting format”. The petition was about allowing people in the UK to legally back up copies of their CDs and DVDs, and translate them into other formats such as mp3, all of which activities are currently a breach of copyright law within the UK. It had nothing to do with the technology which may, or may not, prevent people from doing so.