Ubisoft's crazy DRM: Cracked on launch day?

vbimport

#1

Ubisoft’s crazy DRM: Cracked on launch day?.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/03/YVAYXB.jpg[/newsimage]A new type of digital rights management from Ubisoft, which requires a constant Internet connection to play games, may have already been cracked.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/ubisofts-crazy-drm-cracked-on-launch-day-26804/](http://www.myce.com/news/ubisofts-crazy-drm-cracked-on-launch-day-26804/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

From what I heard this was cracked in under 2 hours.

Ubisoft fails to see that they’ve only increased piracy. Most of these individuals that are cracking these games aren’t doing it to play them, but for the challenge because they say it can’t be done.

:cool::cool:


#3

[QUOTE=platinumsword;2498932]From what I heard this was cracked in under 2 hours.[/quote]I’m sorry, but that would be really awesome. Years of research swooped away in such little time.

That’ll be really really bad press for the people who made this copy protection.


#4

Yeah, I saw it for download. If I was into sim games I would have grabbed it. Soon the crackers will be able to break the DRM a week before it’s even invented. LOL. They’re just hurting the fans. Plain and simple.


#5

I’m glad the DRM was cracked. No comment on the piracy. I hope for a day when DRM is banished from this world! Until then, hackers will have to do the dirty work.


#6

Ubisoft deserves it.

Is there really anything special about this DRM ? I don’t see it taking much R&D or time at all to “invent”.

If InternetConnection.Lost = True then PunishPayingCustomer(fDeleteSaveProgess, fDisconnectGame)


#7

Most (if not all) DRM can be cracked/hacked. What they end up doing is alienating the paying customers, and pirates notice no difference.

I don’t understand why game companies/bluray movie companies/cd companies can’t grasp that. Everything gets hacked. They waste money on the DRM, which is paid for through higher prices, and the pirates don’t notice a damned thing, but the paying customer gets the inferior product.


#8

There are still people that play pc games who live in areas where internet access is not available or only through sketchy satellite connections. DRM steals their money and leaves them with a torn and bloody rectum.


#9

see this article here: How Corporate Law Inhibits Social Responsibility
http://www.negativland.com/news/?page_id=14


#10

The government (state & federal) is doing a pretty good job at wiping out social responsibility also.


#11

This would be so easy to implement, yet they keep f@#$ing it up.

Single activation with keycode + user must create an (passworded) account for permanent activation. After first activation, user can install the game on as many PC’s as they want, so long as the game is activated, with the cd-key & user account.
The result file is encrypted at the server, & downloaded to the machine, and then referenced when the internet connection is offline with the users password.

Simple.
When playing offline, the game asks for the user password to decrypt the legitimate activation file … and people stop getting pissed that they can’t play.

It has the added bonus of killing all secondary sales :wink:


#12

[QUOTE=debro;2499435]This would be so easy to implement, yet they keep f@#$ing it up.

Single activation with keycode + user must create an (passworded) account for permanent activation. After first activation, user can install the game on as many PC’s as they want, so long as the game is activated, with the cd-key & user account.
The result file is encrypted at the server, & downloaded to the machine, and then referenced when the internet connection is offline with the users password.[/quote]

I really don’t get it either. There must be a very easy way to set up your license no matter where you are and no matter on what platform. It could even extend your business model as a gaming company a LOT.

Imagine. Not punishing people who play 2nd hand copies, but offer new licenses with a discount. If a copy is recognized as a pirated version, just offer a new license (just like Microsoft does) again and again.

Stop punishing legitemate users, reward them! Add some nifty toy/jewel/piece of plastic crap/usb thing (at least something that can’t be torrented, put under a Xerox or mass procuded by amateurs easily) with some unique id and/or unique data in it. Offer maps, clothing, bags, whatever. Don’t use algorithms to make your unique serials, have them made by really completely random facts. (Like the weather, monkeys, etc). And give back to your fanbase! Less pirating? Cheaper games! Free maps, etc.


#13

[B]D[/B]igital [B]R[/B]eplica [B]M[/B]eds - This is why I mentioned years back that DRM is effectively a hard drug they (game, movie & music industries) are hooked on, where they are the dealers. In this case, it’s fed into their game and like a serious drug addict, it gets quite upset if it can’t connect to the source.

I think regardless of the direction of sales, they’ll keep experimenting with DRM and of course keep trying to claim it’s for the benefit of the customer and game industry:

[B]Sales slip[/B] (e.g. due to people pirating to avoid DRM) - They’ll blame piracy and try developing “stronger” DRM.
[B]Sales stable[/B] - They wouldn’t risk removing DRM “just in case”.
[B]Sales increase[/B] (popularity or piracy helping promote it) - They assume DRM is working well and try “improving” it.

If you can think of a better abbreviation to describe DRM, post it here.


#14

He, it seems that Ubi’s DRM servers were completely down yesterday, so no legitemate user could play Assasin’s Creed 2. :slight_smile:


#15

[QUOTE=Seán;2499705]I think regardless of the direction of sales, they’ll keep experimenting with DRM and of course keep trying to claim it’s for the benefit of the customer and game industry:

[B]Sales slip[/B] (e.g. due to people pirating to avoid DRM) - They’ll blame piracy and try developing “stronger” DRM.
[B]Sales stable[/B] - They wouldn’t risk removing DRM “just in case”.
[B]Sales increase[/B] (popularity or piracy helping promote it) - They assume DRM is working well and try “improving” it.
[/QUOTE]

I think you’ve hit the nail on the head there, or at least those are the excuses they will claim to keep pushing DRM if not what they actually think. I don’t even think its actually about reason or even actual profitability anymore. Logic would dictate behaving differently, which indicates that either they are total idiots or there is a different agenda that isn’t the obvious one to us.

This is probably more about [B][I]control [/I][/B]than piracy. And it will work because as long as the stuff keeps selling, all they have to do is up the ante and milk even more from the good folks that buy it.

I think the whole HDCP thing is even worse - at least this is disclosed.


#16

Ubisoft needs to realize, that all they are doing to creating more hackers and pirating. It’s the old adage, we want what we can’t or "are not’ supposed to have. Anybody remember the day of… buy the game, own the game, install the game, enter reg code and play till your hearts content. It seems today it’s not the developers are as concerned about a legitimate buying market, (for those who actually use cash) as they are as concerned about controlling who and when people play their games. It seems its a competition between developers and players, rather it should be about people who love to create games and the people who love too play them. (DRM blows, let give it a knew title, "D-on’t R-emove the M-oment, stop taking away the fun of gaming.)


#17

[QUOTE=DouglasRKuster;2562230]Ubisoft needs to realize, that all they are doing to creating more hackers and pirating. It’s the old adage, we want what we can’t or "are not’ supposed to have.[/QUOTE] Exactly!

Mandate: "You may not do [this]! We will cripple your game if you do."
Response: “Oh yeah? Really? We will make it happen no matter what!”

Mandate: "You cannot do [this]!"
Respone: “We’ll be the judge of that! You have no right… blah blah…”

Mandate: "Buy this and get lots of free stuff and no annoyances whatsoever."
Respone: “Well, that’s pretty cool. Thank you!”.