Two movie sanitizing companies have case dismissed

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Two movie sanitizing companies have case dismissed.

ClearPlay and Family Shield Technologies both manufacture methods for consumers to filter out material that they find offensive or undesirable for viewing by themselves or youngsters…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/10753-Two-movie-sanitizing-companies-have-case-dismissed.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/10753-Two-movie-sanitizing-companies-have-case-dismissed.html)

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#2

Everyone knows the term Edited for Television means the same thing - sanitized version. Why is that not fought over in court? It truly is EDITED, unlike this waste of technology for overly ignorant ( it’s true ) and/or lazy parents. Come on, we get these worthless rating systems that the consumers pay for anyway, regardless of choice. Then, movies are edited and shown on stations with the questionable content. Now, there is a move to sanitize television even more… Bring on the bleach, give me some antibiotics and watch the resistant bacteria swallow me whole eventually. Instead of teaching kids properly, some censor what is NOT proper in the relative world causing ignorance amongst curious spongy minds. Kids will figure out anything blocked, because they are inquisitive and WANT to know EVERYTHING. Hide it more, they will want it more. Reverse psychology works on kids the best, they don’t know any better but to fight such oppressive acts. O, I weep for the blind, o how I weep… :B


#3

Wow! Sponsored by Orin Hatch - the same Senator who just a few months ago was screaming about passing legislation to make file sharers felons. He must not have gotten his check or free movie passes this month. I think the concept of the families being able to watch cleaned up movies is great. Personally I prefer the unedited versions as the filmakers intended it to be shown. However, it seems like Hollywood releases a lot of movies and then later does a lot of editing themselves for DVDs. They include extra footage and so on. So their arguments about artistic purity kind of goes out the window when they want to tinker for the sake of additional sales. I see some of the same problems that exist with folks who complain about the RIAA and MPAA tactics and then run out and buy movies and CDs. That is to say that in buying and renting the cleaned up movies the viewers are putting money in the pockets of the very companies that make the movies they think are smutty. too violent, contain offensive language or whatever. Either way you can’t be talking religion and moral decency when you are doing business with the devil. Where the movie makers do have a valid argument is when there is a split of opinion between the clean and not so clean product. That is to say at some point you may have a public that sees the original release and thinks it is great and another sector that views the cleaned up version. At some point one group will think a movie is great and the other may thnk it sucks. If those who watched the altered, cleaned up version start “bumb-rapping” the edited version we are going to waste millions of tax dollars in the court systems watching this thing work it’s way to the Supreme Court. My money says the movie industry is going to win and the family friendly law will be overturned based on multiple issues.


#4

What a liar. You haven’t shed one tear and you know it. Additionally, you were born with more sense than you’re demonstrating. What happened to it?


#5

All I have to say is that if a swear word or a sex scene is ‘making’ a film, then the director needs to seriously look at how good a job he’s actually doing of making the film. Films that are full of extreme violence I hardly think are the type going to be “cleaned up” - more just stories that have the occassional scene and as above, I hope they have a bit more substance to them!