TV executives & advertisers want a "solution" to DVR usage

vbimport

#1

TV executives & advertisers want a “solution” to DVR usage.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2010/10/hZAvIy.jpg[/newsimage]In an effort to reduce the number of viewers that are recording TV content only to skip commercials later, TV executives are brainstorming new subscription plans and other ideas. There are no easy answers now, but executives understand they will have to find solutions that don’t interfere with overall viewing experience.


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/tv-executives-advertisers-want-a-solution-to-dvr-usage-35368/](http://www.myce.com/news/tv-executives-advertisers-want-a-solution-to-dvr-usage-35368/)


Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

I commend these guys for not taking the knee jerk responses the RIAA and MPAA have done. I actually can sympathize with them a little. I think a great way to handle this is to offer credits against your cable bill for watching the commercials. People will watch them if there is a financial benefit. Then the cable company gets a kickback from the content provider. Or offer a DVR for less money, or for free, that won’t let you skip commercials.


#3

As a westcoaster, the temptation to PVR the broadcast from the eastern feed, and watch it commercial free afterwards (before or at the same time it broadcasts in the west) is to tempting.

Commercials eat up nearly 1/3 of a tv show now, its spiraled to the point where I can’t stand watching tv with commercials (unless its sports).

If they made it so people had to watch commercials, I think it would shift more viewers to grabbing their shows off the internet from less reputable sources.

if the average person watches 2 hours of tv a day… 40 mins is commercials, and thats 40x7= 280 minutes a week. 4 hours 40 minutes? thats crazy!

And now with tv channels wanting subscriber fees, we pay to watch commercials. It’s a pretty wierd business model, how people ended up paying to watch commercials.


#4

I often start recording a show and wait 20 minutes to start watching it. That gives me just about enough buffer to skip the ads and still have the show end on time.


#5

Getting shows off the internet is way better than DVR. No commercials, no nonsense and still in HD. Screw these TV stations. When I have to PAY for TV, it should be commercial free. Otherwise GTFO. We dropped all our tv channels and repurposed our connection for internet. At least now when I watch a favorite show, I don’t have to deal with the annoying moronic commercials.

Of course there’s still the product placement in the shows themselves which nobody seems to account for at all.

This is just another example of the media trying to wrench control from users.
Protip: See VCR

Of course if I need to record a show, I will use open source tools to do so, so I can run commercial stripping software. They can’t hold me down!


#6

We all pay for commercials anyway.
Each time you pay for a product that is advertised part of the price goes to advertising. Part of that is for TV commercials.
The next time you hear about a TV star getting a million an episode give a thought to how much this increases the cost of products you buy.
This cost also has a domino effect: For example if your restaurant uses a certain steak sauce that is advertised then that product costs them more so your meal costs more .You may not even use the steak sauce but you pay for it. If it is a business lunch & the cost is passed on to that business then customers of that business also pay for the steak sauce advertising. Take that & multiply it by the millions of products this applies to.
Not to leave out the final increase in cost.When the cost of a product is higher because of advertising you pay more sales tax.


#7

DVR usage isn’t a problem that needs to be fixed.
Too much time filled with the same stupid and repetitive commercials is the problem and the DVR is a solution!

[QUOTE=Zod;2549862]Commercials eat up nearly 1/3 of a tv show now, its spiraled to the point where I can’t stand watching tv with commercials (unless its sports).[/QUOTE] After having used a DVR for years now, I no longer want to watch channels with 2/3 content and 1/3 commercials, and if I was somehow prevented from recording and skipping most commercials, I would no longer watch those channels.

And it’s not like those commercial channels are free - we pay for them through the cable company (on top of the fee for access).


#8

I don’t understand why they don’t use product placement in TV shows like they do with movies (and even video games now). Instead of the guy in the show holding a generic beer or soda, have him hold a nice cold Bud or Coke. Have the characters go out to dinner at some name-brand chain restaurant instead of a generic cafe. They could do this with every product the characters use in the TV show. The advertisers would get their advertising in, and it would just look normal to the viewers. Maybe they could get rid of commercials!


#9

cholla,
of course we are paying for commercials when we buy products. they are thinking about the future. the concern is that when more and more of the audience is skipping commercials, that the companies that make these products will stop putting the money you have spent into tv advertising. when the advertising goes away, the tv shows could go away.

of course, that won’t happen. they will find a solution rather than allow tv shows to disappear. but rest assured, it is a problem.

Also, it’s usually the other way around in your steak sauce scenario. Restaurant chains get products for free or a discounted price when they agree to advertise and/or use it excusively. Steven Spielberg was allowed to beat up those Ford Explorers for free when he made Jurassic Park just because he put them in the film. It worked too. The Explorer was a huge hit after the film.

product placement works fine for me. I notice it, but it hardly bothers me at all. as long as it is subtle, unlike Michael Bay’s retarded placements. His movies look like the ads in The Truman Show.


#10

If I’m forced to view the commercials when using the DVR playback, I’ll simply drop the DVR service, save the $15/month I pay for it, and go back to recording on my VCR or DVD recorder and still skip all commercials.

Sorry, but I’m a consumer that never pays attention to the crap commercials on TV and have never bought anything from a TV ad. When the commercials play at such a loud level I’m forced to hit mute (easier than lowering the volume and then having to raise it again for the TV show), and when they force such annoying commercials on us where I have to hit mute to save my sanity (like the I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter jingle where she sounds like a friggin’ chipmunk singing)… sorry, but I’m going to do all I can to avoid the commercials and not feel the least bit of guilt over it after having to listen to the trash they peddle.


#11

My wife and I record all the scheduled TV content we want to watch and watch it the next night [I]and skip the commercials[/I]. Nothing about the programs is so important we need to see it the night it’s broadcast. This way we get the programs without commercials.

If the broadcasters decide to force us to watch the commercials, we’ll just wait until the program is available on Netflix - without commercials - and either watch a stream of it or watch the DVD. We’ll become completely invisible to the network that attempts to force us to watch commercials.

I realize the network income is made up mostly with the payment for commercials, but in the case of most commercials, if the production quality is as bad as most, watching the commercial is such a jarring experience I’m convinced to avoid the product rather than purchase it.


#12

Commercials are a necessary evil… And you know what, actually, that should be ok… Why isn’t it ok though? For the most part, because the content is awful, we see the same ones over and over and/or we have no way of getting to the advertiser (i.e. showing a Sonic commercial in upstate NY)…

A great many of us don’t watch commericals as it is - so go ahead TV executives & advertisers - force us to watch them… and we will watch your shows and see your products even less - how’d you like them Nielsen ratings?


#13

We’ve quit watching broadcast TV shows because most programs weren’t worth watching, and the few that were had too many commercials. Nothing, no show is worth putting up with that for 1/3 of every hour. Using the DVR was too much of a hassle. We not only quit watching live TV, we canceled our cable TV service. We rely on Netflix live streaming now to watch a few, choice older shows without interruption. Eventually, I’m sure commercials will be forced into the video streams. When that happens, we’ll quit watching streaming. The only way I would resume watching commercial TV is if the ads were reduced to 1/10 of the total program time – a tithe, as it were. It works for God.


#14

LOL@ “It works for God”


#15

I don’t mind seeing the odd commercial now & again, e.g. one ad before something will stream is fine with me. However, seeing 5+ minutes of ads per ad-break and several ad-breaks per show is way too much. No wonder most PVR owners skip them!

In my opinion, there is no reason to show that many ads per break, as most of the ads are repeated in every second or third ad-break anyway.

So my advice would be to show just 2 ads per ad-break in rotation. As long as the viewer watches TV an hour or two a day and watches all the ads, they will eventually see all the ads, even if it takes a few days of viewing to see all the ads in rotation. Also, if there was just 2 ads per ad-break, I’m sure many PVR users wouldn’t bother skipping them.


#16

If I’m to pay for DVR service (which I don’t), I will record, playback, skip, or delete anything I please. If the industry plans on denying me that control, they better also plan on not charging me for the service. I’ve been using VCRs for decades just so I COULD watch a program without a blasted interruption every five minutes. I propose one simple regulation from the FCC and/or FTC which would alleviate the entire problem: any channel for which at least 20% of its viewers must pay to receive cannot run commercials; therefore if they just must run commercials, they cannot charge the viewer for that channel.


#17

There are some commercials I actually enjoy… Like movie trailers. I have the skip feature on my TiVo set to 30 seconds. I generally watch the first few seconds of a commercial, and if it doesn’t interest me… Boop! On to the next one!

I did catch myself skipping through the commercials on a program I was watching, then pausing the playback so I could get up and get a cold drink. LOL! Remember when commercial breaks were so you could get a snack or run to the bathroom? Ha! I love technology. :slight_smile:


#18

[QUOTE=arapheon;2549978]Also, it’s usually the other way around in your steak sauce scenario. Restaurant chains get products for free or a discounted price when they agree to advertise and/or use it exclusively. [/QUOTE]
Maybe they do that but the day I eat in a steak restaurant & they only have one steak sauce I will walk out. I think most of the time they have to buy the products especially local restaurants.
It was just an example to show that we pay for products in commercials & therefore the advertising whether we watch the commercials or not.

[QUOTE=Seán;2550071]I don’t mind seeing the odd commercial now & again, e.g. one ad before something will stream is fine with me.

So my advice would be to show just 2 ads per ad-break in rotation. As long as the viewer watches TV an hour or two a day and watches all the ads, they will eventually see all the ads, even if it takes a few days of viewing to see all the ads in rotation. [/QUOTE]
I with you on that I wouldn’t bother to skip for two ads done that way. Unless as Henderson posted the volume is raised.
The real solution would be to pay less to actors & the whole TV industry.
If shows didn’t cost as much then they wouldn’t need as many ads.

Even when I skip an ad I still have to watch it to some degree .I & I’m sure most recognize a McDonald’s ad in fast forward. So we still get a subliminal message.


#19

When i want to save something from my PVR to DVD I set chapter marks at the [I]ends [/I]of commercial blocks. Gives me the best of both worlds, hit ‘Next Chapter’ to skip commercials or let it run and see the old commercials and news bumpers…


#20

I can see why they’re trying to find away around this…But if these companies don’t want they’re commercials skipped, why not make them interesting?
When I had a MOXI box, I used to forward through commercials all the time, except funny or interesting ones, I would always go back and watch them.