TP-Link has started to lock its routers to prevent installing DD-WRT and Tomato

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: TP-Link has started to lock its routers to prevent installing DD-WRT and Tomato[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/02/Archer-C7-02-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

Router manufacturer TP-Link has started to lock its routers in the United States so users can no longer install modified firmware on them such a DD-WRT and Tomato.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/tp-link-has-started-to-lock-its-routers-to-prevent-installing-dd-wrt-78623/](http://www.myce.com/news/tp-link-has-started-to-lock-its-routers-to-prevent-installing-dd-wrt-78623/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

I wonder if this affects TP-Link products sold outside of the US.

One interesting point in the FCC requirements is that Wi-Fi enabled devices must not provide a user-configurable country selection.

This likely explains why many Wi-Fi routers come in slightly different versions, i.e. one version for the US and another for the rest of the world with a country selection choice in its GUI.



#3

This article is incorrect. If you read the actual FCC documentation it explicitly says that 3rd party firmware modification is allowed and in fact, encouraged. All that is required is for the original equipment manufacturer to have an agreement with the supplier of the 3rd party firmware that the 3rd party firmware maker will not permit operation outside of the authorization for operation in the United States.

All that TP-link has to do is have dd-wrt sign a document saying they won’t put in functions allowing users to make RF changes, that is all the FCC requires. Then TP-Link can issue a boot security key that is compiled into the dd-wrt firmware by the dd-wrt project that will allow dd-wrt to boot on the TP-Link routers.

The fact is that TP-Link just doesn’t want dd-wrt on their stuff for whatever reason, and is using the FCC as an excuse. I don’t see the problem here users can just buy gear from router vendors like Linksys who work with dd-wrt and are friendly to it. There’s no reason to bother with TP-Link’s stuff.


#4

[QUOTE=tmittelstaedt;2768847]This article is incorrect. If you read the actual FCC documentation it explicitly says that 3rd party firmware modification is allowed and in fact, encouraged. All that is required is for the original equipment manufacturer to have an agreement with the supplier of the 3rd party firmware that the 3rd party firmware maker will not permit operation outside of the authorization for operation in the United States.

All that TP-link has to do is have dd-wrt sign a document saying they won’t put in functions allowing users to make RF changes, that is all the FCC requires. Then TP-Link can issue a boot security key that is compiled into the dd-wrt firmware by the dd-wrt project that will allow dd-wrt to boot on the TP-Link routers.

The fact is that TP-Link just doesn’t want dd-wrt on their stuff for whatever reason, and is using the FCC as an excuse. I don’t see the problem here users can just buy gear from router vendors like Linksys who work with dd-wrt and are friendly to it. There’s no reason to bother with TP-Link’s stuff.[/QUOTE]

Thank you for the information :iagree:

… and welcome to the forum tmittelstaedt :flower:


#5

This FCC regulation seems like a bad idea. It is almost guaranteed to stifle FOSS firmwares, since “someone might enable people to violate FCC regulations.” I might also use a modified version of Notepad++ to commit fraud, but that doesn’t mean Notepad++ is illegal.