Top five budget routers that won't disappoint

vbimport

#1

I admit it, I have a problem. I am a fan of fast networking products and often feel uneasy if what I have isn’t the latest and greatest. That hasn’t changed at all, despite the fact that over the years, I have realized that the latest and greatest is generally way more than I need.
Link: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-3132_7-57528238-98/top-five-budget-routers-that-wont-disappoint/

:cool::cool:


#2

That TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless N Nano Router got great reviews in Computer Shopper.

It’s particularly great for travellers in hotel rooms with only LAN sockets instead of WiFi.

[B]Wombler[/B]


#3

The quote is so damn true. I feel the same and because of that I am stuck with a Linux based Linksys/Cisco router. It delivers. For years. No problems at all. :wink:


#4

I have been using a refurbished Netgear WNDR3700 I bought for $50 a few years ago and I have no plans to replace it any time soon. It works better than any previous router I have owned. I have opted to go with PCMCIA to PCI adapters with dual band PCMCIA cards with new computer builds. With the WNDR3700 they deliver about 15-20 MB/s transfer speeds over the local network. Better than any USB dongle I have used. Plus, they can be bought for cheap on evilbay.


#5

Under my desk, a Tenda W311R+ that cost me all of £12.50 (special offer at ebuyer a couple of years ago), quite adequate, got more options than I ever use.


#6

My only vice with this subject is that “budget” is never defined. Any home or SOHO router can be defined as “budget” when compared to real high end Cisco equipment… so at what end is the high of “budget” no longer being considered “budget” worthy

I personally always spend somewhat under a hundred for my Router and end up with third party firmware on the device, thereby rendering it small/medium business or SOHO powerhouses. But for some people, even this may be too much and would define going past the fifty dollar value above what is referred to as a “budget” router.