Top artists continue to resist a la carte Internet downloads

vbimport

#1

I just posted the article Top artists continue to resist a la carte Internet downloads.

Crabbyappleton used our news submit to tell us
that according to an article over at BILLBOARD, some top artists are still resisting the authorization of the…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/6096-Top-artists-continue-to-resist-a-la-carte-Internet-downloads.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/6096-Top-artists-continue-to-resist-a-la-carte-Internet-downloads.html)

Feel free to add your comments below. 

Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

This is just one of the many reasons we need to dismantle the out of date music business. Stop PAYING for MUSIC! Pass it on (show you grandmother how to pirate music)


#3

Shit…Can’t make an album with 2 good songs and 12 bits of filler… Help… Losing revenue stream… Er - write good music, be loyal to your fans, and they’ll support you and buy your stuff? What a crazy idea!


#4

I thought Linkin Park became famous from their music being on Napster and mp3.com? Now they don’t like it?


#5

But they don’t mind putting out CD singles? Since the singles are usually of the popular songs, which would also be the ones getting downloaded, what’s the difference?


#6

It would be much better for the artists to publish the music them selves, i.e. sell it directly from the websites. In this way, they could make as much selling tracks as they would selling albums through the music industry. I.e. Ditch the middleman (Music industry) altogether! :+:X:B


#7

Some albums work as a whole and should not be split into seperate singles. Like Pink Floyd’s albums where each track can and often does blend into the next. Buta lot of those albums where the tracks are completely seperate entities can be split. Using album tracks to prop up an artists finances shows how wrong that model is. They are basically admitting that they depend on selling an album of mostly filler tracks with 1 or 2 good tracks. Yup. Admitting it by saying what they are saying. I’m not saying every track on an album should be able to sell on it’s own mind. Of course the ideal should be that the artist gets to decide whether the album is sold as a whole or not online. But they must pay a penalty for that privilege in that the album would be a third cheaper to buy as a whole than buying it as seperate tracks. That would make it fair IMO.