Tools used for this?

vbimport

#1

I’d like to know the tools you used for making this article. I mean what program to view them, what program to snap them, and what program to zoom in.

Thanks.

http://www.cdfreaks.com/article/114/9


#2

Hi Qozon, welcome to our forums!

I guess you could send a PM to the author (G@M3FR3@K), but I think I know the answer.

For capturing: play the DVD (or files on your harddisk) with a software player and capture the screen (print-screen button on your keyboard).

After doing so, open up a image editing program, like Paint shop pro or Photoshop, paste the captured image from the clipboard and select + enlarge the region you care about…!


#3

i think it involves more than that, cuz u need to capture the same frame from every movie in order to compare them all equally (which is what G@M3FR3@K did). i’d like to know the answer to this too.


#4

Originally posted by AZImmortal
i think it involves more than that, cuz u need to capture the same frame from every movie in order to compare them all equally (which is what G@M3FR3@K did). i’d like to know the answer to this too.

Ah yes I see… VirtualDub can do this…


#5

Screenshots for this article were taken with TechSmit’s SnagIt software. I played the DVD files in PowerDVD and set it on pause and jumped to the scene I wanted. Then the screens were captured with SnagIt and pasted in Paint Shop Pro and enlarged. Quite a lot of work, let me tell you :wink:


#6

I’ve just tried that. I might be doing something wrong, but it won’t work. I don’t know how to explain it…I’ve played the file in power dvd and captured using snagit, but the image wont zoom in. I’ve tried saving the file and opening it in paintshop…that doesn’t work…For some reason, whenever I zoom, the image stays the same size…Is there something i’m missing? How do I enlarge instead of zoom?


#7

Originally posted by qozon
I’ve just tried that. I might be doing something wrong, but it won’t work. I don’t know how to explain it…I’ve played the file in power dvd and captured using snagit, but the image wont zoom in. I’ve tried saving the file and opening it in paintshop…that doesn’t work…For some reason, whenever I zoom, the image stays the same size…Is there something i’m missing? How do I enlarge instead of zoom?

Well I’m no photo editing guru, but I think this is the easiest way to do (that’s the way I do it with PSP):

  1. select the part of the screen you want to enlarge and copy it to the clipboard
  2. paste the copied image to a new picture (pressing control+v will do this)
  3. enlarge the picture (use the resize functionality from the edit menu)
  4. save it :wink:

#8

try it yourself, and you might know what I mean…The dvd image cannot be moved, edited, resized, zoomed in, or anything of the sort. I’ve read that it might ahve something to do with directshow? Maybe G@M3FR3@K could give me more specific instructions, since this is my first try at image editing and sort…


#9

I think using PowerDVD’s capture feature will eliminate the problem you are having. Just click the button with the camera icon:

This will copy the screen image to the clipboard. Then open up your favorite image editing software and Edit->Paste and viola, now you have a regular picture you can edit, crop, resize, zoom, etc.

I’ve seen what you are describing, and I think you are right that it has something to do with DirectShow. But boy, it sure is bizarre! If I use Paint Shop Pro’s (PSP) capture feature to grab the screen, even after saving the file as .psp, .png, or .gif, closing PSP, and then restarting PSP and reopening the file, the image still shows whatever is current on the screen, not what was “captured” and “saved”. And, if you hit the play button on the DVD software again, you can watch the movie playing in the frame in PSP.

I could understand not being able to capture and save it, but to “capture” and “save” the live image? Weird!

Anyway, use PowerDVD’s capture button and your problems will be solved.

cfitz


#10

Would that work? I tried that, but the image was all pixels if I zoom in…I didn’t get the results that G@M3FR3@K when he zoomed in…

I think G@M3FR3@K can answer this only…


#11

Sure it works (click the images to see the original screen capture):

Now, is the pixelation of which you are complaining similar to what you see in the first of my zoomed images versus the second? That is simply a function of what, if any, interpolation you use when you zoom in by resizing the image with your image editor.

My first example uses simple pixel resizing. In other words, I just made each pixel three times its original size. This makes the pixels larger and, thus, the pixelation easier to see. It is the same effect you would get if you just move your eyeball closer to the original image.

My second example uses bicubic interpolation. It uses the values of the original pixels to calculate interpolated values for the new pixels that are inserted when the image is made larger, thus making the picture smoother.

There are many other interpolation methods as well that use different algorithms to approximate the values for the new pixels, including the aforementioned bicubic, bilinear, triangle, Bell, Mitchell, Hermite, Lanczos, et cetera methods. They vary in how fast they calculate and how smoothly they interpolate while still maintaining detail. I wouldn’t worry about understanding all the differences. For the most part the results will look pretty similar as long as you use some form of interpolation and not just pixel resizing.

It looks like G@M3FR3@K used some sort of interpolation beyond simple pixel resizing when he made his zoomed images. Read the instructions for you image editor and you will find out how to use the different interpolation methods.

cfitz


#12

Thank you very much!


#13

You’re welcome.

Just for fun I made a few extreme zoom images to highlight some of the differences in interpolation methods.

Pixel Resizing:

Bicubic:

Lanczos:

As you can see, the Lanczos method did the best job of smoothing out the pixels, but it is very slow. The bicubic interpolation is showing some pixelation at this level of zoom (10x), but is fairly quick. The simple pixel resizing is fastest and shows the original pixels in their unvarnished, raw form.

In some ways, pixel resizing might be best for making comparisons, since it allows you to easily see the artifacts of the mpeg compression. In my example here the macroblocks are clearly visible. In other ways, an interpolated image is better for comparisons, since under normal viewing conditions your eye will see the interpolated version. Both are useful for different purposes.

cfitz


#14

Originally posted by qozon The dvd image cannot be moved, edited, resized, zoomed in, or anything of the sort.
Is your graphics card set up in 16-bit color mode? I did a little more experimenting, and found that this effect only occurs when my card is in 16-bit mode or 8-bit mode (65536 and 256 colors, respectively). When I set it up in 24-bit mode the effect does not occur and I can capture using any capture software such as PSP or even the Print Screen key.

Apparently in the lower color modes DirectX renders the video to any area on the screen that matches a particular color value. That includes programs, images in programs, icons, anything! As long as the video is being rendered to the screen and a pixel of the “magic” color overlays the area where the video is being rendered, DirectX will render the video to that pixel, even if it doesn’t belong to the DVD player program.

Try it! If your system is like mine, one of these two color swatches will work (R=255, G=0, B=255 for 8-bit mode, R=8, G=0, B=8 for 16-bit mode):

8-bit:

16-bit:

Switch your graphics card to 8- or 16-bit mode (right-click the desktop, pick “Properties”->“Settings” and then change the “Colors” value), play a DVD using your DVD player software (leaving the window open - don’t minimize it or the rendering will stop) and then slide this post over top of the player’s window. You should be able to see the video playing in one of the above two “screens”. :eek:

What do you know? CDFreaks has its own DVD player software. And it’s free! :wink:

I would be interested in hearing how this works (or doesn’t) for others.

cfitz


#15

One more question, how do I make sure I am zooming in on the exact same portion every time? For instance, you zoomed in one the One Ring, how did you make sure you weren’t a pixel of or something?

I am using photoshop…but I also have paint shop pro…


#16

Both packages (and any good image editing software) include readouts of the pixel coordinates where your cursor is placed and the size of the box you are cropping. The upper left corner of the picture is (0,0), and the lower right is (width-1,height-1) where width and height are the total number of pixels in those two dimensions.

Look for the coordinates in the lower left border of the program frame for PSP (that’s where they are in version 5 - the latest I have) or in the “Info” palette in the palette well of Photoshop (the row of tabbed dialogs in the upper right corner). You can undock palettes by clicking and dragging them out of the well so that they are always easily visible.

What I did was open the full size image, resize to the desired magnification (4x or 400% in my first examples, 10x or 1000% in the second), then crop the desired area using the crop tool and watching the coordinates to make sure I got the exact same region each time. This is easier to do if you magnify the image to focus in on the general area you want to work with, and then fine tune by using the coordinate displays. Note that magnifying doesn’t actually resize the image file, it just increases the size displayed on the screen while you are working with it.

I believe you can set up a script in PhotoShop to automate this, and also maybe in newer versions of PSP. That will make it very convenient if you want to do a lot of these, but first you will have to learn how to make the script.

Okay, I’ve answered a bunch of your questions and even made and posted examples for you. Now, how about you answer my question regarding the color depth setting of your graphics card and whether or not the little trick I described in my previous post works on your machine? :smiley:

cfitz


#17

I might just be doing it wrong, but it doesn’t work for me. I changed mine to 16 bit and I can’t see anything in the screens.