Tiny fleck of dust on DVD

vbimport

#1

After I burned a DVD and it was verified by Nero with no errors, I noticed a tiny fleck of dust on the bottom side of the disc.

After I took a can of compressed air to it, I noticed a tiny darker spot where possibly nothing was burned.

Dumb question: Is it possible that the tiny bit of dust could have prevented data being burned in that spot even though Nero verified it as being ok?

Thank you.


#2

That spot will have [I]slightly[/I] greater digital errors than the rest of the disc, but usually will not be great enough to cause a complete read failure. Your data can be retrieved as normal, assuming that the disc was already being written properly.


#3

i completely agree with Albert. although just out of curiosity can you explain this statement?

verified by Nero with no errors


#4

Well, I’m not hip to all the cool verification tools everyone on here is using. But when using Nero 6?, it gives the option to verify after burning a data dvd or using ‘back it up’.

If there are better verification tools, could you please let me know?

I’ve seriously only burned about 10 DVDs ever. DVDs always scared me…lol On the other hand I’ve burned plenty of CD’s.

Thanks.


#5

troy 512, I’m reading some of your FAQs listed in your signature. Very useful. Thanks.


#6

[QUOTE=Albert;2111832]That spot will have [I]slightly[/I] greater digital errors than the rest of the disc, but usually will not be great enough to cause a complete read failure. Your data can be retrieved as normal, assuming that the disc was already being written properly.[/QUOTE]

In a very odd case with not so good supported, or poor made media, you can have that much dust accumulation, that a spot can be unreadable.
But you’ll have to use poor/bad supported media, have quite some bad luck, and have to use a quite dusty room to encounter that one.


#7

To overwhelm the DVD error correction / parity system, an roughly round unburnt spot should be rather large, say about 5mm² (or even more than that).

But even a tiny unburnt spot will appear in a scan as a PIF peak, and often as a PIF cluster. With a large cluster, some lesser readers may have to slow down or even re-read to retrieve the data.

In my experience, with most dust-induced unburnt spots, there is nothing to be concerned about in terms of immediate readability, which is not affected.
On the other hand, tough, I found that in some instances, the area around the unburnt spot tends to show small, but significant, PIE/PIF degradation over time. So there is a possible concern in terms of life expectancy.

I choosed to dust all my blanks before burning. :wink: