This is from my local newspaper: DVDs need special care to prevent damage

vbimport

#1

If you want a good laugh click here


#2
    • Expanded the title to something more descriptive * *

The paper doesn’t seem aware that there’s a difference between the layers in a CD and a DVD. Making a 0.6mm deep scratch in a DVD is very difficult unless you really want to do it.

Some older CDs have a completely unprotected top layer (reflective layer) however, and I’m sure you could damage those by using a pen with the wrong type of solvent, so the article isn’t completely off the mark.


#3

Thanks
I’ve been burning CD’s for 8 or 9 years and never came across any that i could not use a sharpie on.


#4

Ink leaking through… any truth to this ??


#5

I´ve heard of this too…a common comment. I suspect there´s some truth to it.
I try to use pens that are made for CDs…better safe than sorry etc.


#6

Don’t even have to read it to know they didn’t have a clue about what they were trying to say.

Am I the only one who gets frustrated by people who get things wrong like this?


#7

In a short period i used a regular permanent marker for drawing on (among other) some printable dvdr’s and i must admit the color is pretty much washed out and i sometimes wonder if it will matter in the long run? Discs are printable Verbatims 2x and they still scan/read well :slight_smile:


#8

well it would be amazing to see a perminant marker get though a polycarbonate disc to the data it annoys me when people fail to recognise the difference in the construction of dvds to cds i noticed the first moment i picked up a pressed dvd.


#9

I sent them an email asking them what was their source for the info they published. I also gave them my phone number but haven’t heard anything yet.


#10

Nope that’s why i posted this and emailed them. Where did you get this information at?


#11

Well she didn’t give me any info on where the story got their info but said good luck with you lacquer covered discs and the ink you used.


#12

This guy is a moron.

Only on a CD-R with a bare foil exposed, AND using an extremely acidic marker, AND waiting several years for it to react, would such a thing occur.

Did anybody else notice how he totally ignored the question about labels, and went onto this tirade about markers?

And then it is called “inkjet media”. He referred to it as “white surface” media.

I don’t think this guy has ever even burned a disc, much less have qualifications to answer questions about the technology. All he does is spout myth in print.

I hate, hate, hate, hate, hate misinformation. Especially the really stupid myths.


#13

There are “white tops” that are not inkjet, and compared to clear lacquer, they do seem to be a bit more robust in tolerating marker or label adhesive chemistry - some of the cheaper lacquer CD-R have a tendency to de-laminate, with the lacquer and silvering coming off with the label.


#14

But my That’s 52x CD-R’s セラミツクコート* and my Verbatim’s Extra Protection Surface are white surfaces too. And there’s silver inkjet printable. :bigsmile:

Actually there are quite a few CD-Rs outside that have extremely volatile surfaces (mostly shiny silver), but not all are. In fact most are not.

  • Ceramic coat

EDIT: Matth beat me by… four minutes :eek:


#15

Ha, the irony.

At least we can agree that this article is BS when it relates to markers and DVDs (though I’ve seen CDs eventually damaged by markers).