This DVD Will Self-Destruct

vbimport

#1

From wired.com :


LOS ANGELES – This disc will self-destruct in 48 hours. That is the warning Walt Disney will issue this August when it begins to “rent” DVDs that after two days become unplayable and do not have to be returned.

Disney home-video unit Buena Vista Home Entertainment will launch a pilot movie rental program in August that uses the self-destruction technology, the company said on Friday.

The discs stop working when a process similar to rusting makes them unreadable. The discs start off red, but when they are taken out of the package, exposure to oxygen turns the coating black and makes it impenetrable by a DVD laser.

Buena Vista hopes the technology will let it crack a wider rental market, since it can sell the DVDs in stores or almost anywhere without setting up a system to get the discs back.

The discs work perfectly for the two-day viewing window, said Flexplay Technologies, the private company which developed the technology using material from General Electric.

The technology cannot be hacked by programmers who would want to view the disc longer because the mechanism which closes the viewing window is chemical and has nothing to do with computer technology.

However, the disc can be copied within 48 hours, since it works like any other DVD during that window.

Buena Vista did not disclose pricing plans but said the discs, dubbed EZ-D, would be available in August in select markets with recent releases including The Recruit, The Hot Chick and Signs.


Oh well, the things some people will think to protect their products … :rolleyes: :slight_smile:

Somehow though, i am missing the way one could do such a thing and still make money out of it … unless they rent these DVDs at a price one could just buy them.


#2

I remember VHS tapes with such a thing on them (they’d explode if you tried to copy them, and damage both your tape as your VCR).

Ah well… there’re are still a lot of stupid people on the globe… :wink:


#3

These DVDs have been announced months ago…never thought that they would really be introduced :bigsmile:


#4

It would be interesting to know what they use that gets oxidized and ruins the dye. And how it is introduced into the dye without making its presence 'known" in the reading process.

I remember VHS tapes with such a thing on them (they’d explode if you tried to copy them, and damage both your tape as your VCR).
Really now?.. exploding VHS tapes?? Jesus!! :rolleyes:


#5

Just what we need more crap in the landfills in order to make it easier for everybody all around. :rolleyes: :a :frowning:


#6

I totally agree w/ Sorondil. These greedy coporate bastards are planning on piling more crap in landfills for nothing more than protecting their profit…

However, the disc can be copied within 48 hours, since it works like any other DVD during that window.

So what’s the point when people backup the DVDs 5 minutes after they open the envelope?


#7

Originally posted by Stoner
So what’s the point when people backup the DVDs 5 minutes after they open the envelope?

A lot of people are still not able to backup the DVD…

As for the rest, if this so-called protection results in the absence of Macrovision (would be too expensive because of licensing I think), the backing up would only become easier.

But this technique sux when you have someone purposely or accidentally punching holes in the packaging and thus expose these discs to oxygen prematurely…

But hey, wouldn’t it be cool to get these black DVD coasters for your coffeecups? :wink:


#8

and if they do introduce these discs, what the hell is it going to cost us to rent them, as i’m sure they won’t sell them to the rental store for only a couple of bucks


#9

I just recently heard this week here in the U.S. that quote: “they want to make a computer that will blow up if you download music” according to CNBC TV (parent company: GE)

Go figure.:frowning:


#10

Blow up my system if I download music… OMFG!!! runs out the door

Seriously, what are they gonna do? Use C4 as the package for the CPU?

Oh, I would very much like to have one of these black DVDs as coasters.


#11

Originally posted by Stoner

Seriously, what are they gonna do? Use C4 as the package for the CPU?

Wouldn’t the heat from the CPU make the C4 blow up anyway?


#12

Originally posted by Angel of Death
[B]I just recently heard this week here in the U.S. that quote: “they want to make a computer that will blow up if you download music” according to CNBC TV (parent company: GE)

Go figure.:frowning: [/B]

lol, and there will probably be some kind of bug in the controlling software that will make it blow up spontaneously :wink:


#13

yeah, windows would do that to you :slight_smile:


#14

They will be all the range for terrorists. LOL


#15

Originally posted by Hemispasm

The discs stop working when a process similar to rusting makes them unreadable. The discs start off red, but when they are taken out of the package, exposure to oxygen turns the coating black and makes it impenetrable by a DVD laser.

What is to stop a would be user who wants to make the most of his ‘rental’ spray a fixing agent onto the surface of the DVD to stop it oxidising, like some kind of clear polymer spray or a very thin layer of WD40 (get ready to clean your DVD drive, just in case ;))?

The only way this would not work is if atmospheric reactants (perhaps oxygen) are catalysts for the copy protection process and not reactants themselves. But from the phrasing, this does not seem to be the case. If it is, then it is just a matter of opening it in a oxygen-poor area - perhaps recently boiled water or a carbon dioxide containing vessel.

Of course, as was pointed out, you could always just try to copy it within 48 hours too.


#16

Originally posted by Devils Advocate
[B]The only way this would not work is if atmospheric reactants (perhaps oxygen) are catalysts for the copy protection process and not reactants themselves. But from the phrasing, this does not seem to be the case. If it is, then it is just a matter of opening it in a oxygen-poor area - perhaps recently boiled water or a carbon dioxide containing vessel.

Of course, as was pointed out, you could always just try to copy it within 48 hours too. [/B]
oh yeah, and then you should put the whole damn pot (full of boiled water, of course…) inside your standalone… :bigsmile: :bigsmile:
the right steps are

  1. open the box
  2. put (red… sweeet! :cool: ) disc inside dvdrom
  3. fire up smartripper
  4. click on backup and then on start
  5. start again from number one, this time with dvddecrypter, you know, just in case :bigsmile:
  6. throw it inside the junk-can: who needs it anymore? :slight_smile:

#17

That is, of course, assuming you can copy it at such short notice :wink: Otherwise you may want to look at increasing the lifespan of the thing while you pay this site a visit :bigsmile:


#18

The problem is though, with all above discussed options, they are very likely to violate the license agreement.

You pay for the two day use, not for the everlasting possession of the product. Hence, if they show you the agreement prior to buying and opening the package, I doubt there is pretty much you can do against it. However, if the agreement is only shown upon playing of the disc and thus after opening the package, I feel that it should be possible to return it to the retailer you bought it from because you don’t agree with the terms of the agreement.

If there is no agreement at all (which I highly doubt, knowing the industry), but simply this ‘protection’, by all means, no harm then in discussing it here :wink:


#19

Originally posted by Da_Taxman
You pay for the two day use
i swear i won’t be using it anymore after 48 hours :bigsmile: :smiley:


#20

I’m curious as to what the packaging will look like? Will it be the same as a normal DVD or something cheaper? Will it have the same cover art? What kind of case will it be in?