Thin sound in copy

vbimport

#1

Hello

I hope I’m posting this at the right place =)

I copied some game music OSTs for my mother (she wants the “slow” songs only, so thats why) and noticed that the copy sounded thin compared to the original.

I used EAC (compressed the files to .flac) and burned using Burrrn. The blank media is those JVC Taiyo Yuden.
I had to burn at 10x because it didn’t seem like my burner could write at a slower speed, could this be the cause or why does it sound thin when it’s an exact copy?

Thanks in advance and sorry for my English.


#2

No one?

Perhaps thinner is not exactly the right way to describe it, more like flatter, less dynamic.


#3

Hi :slight_smile:
Here is a clue.

I used EAC ([u]compressed[/u] the files to .flac)

So it would be “less dynamic”.


#4

Thank you for your answer. I’m not sure I understand, Isn’t flac lossless? And also those flac files became uncompressed again when burning the audio cd with Burrrn.


#5

Hi :slight_smile:
Yes & no.
It depends on how good your set up is.
Most programs involving compression will have some loss.
Personally I tend to think of lossless as losing less than others. :wink:
Generally this shouldn’t present a great deal.
All I can suggest is that you try cloning the audio tracks.
Then if problems persist look to media.
Burning audio @ 16x is common practice without any problems.
I burn even faster, but this is then PC/burner/media dependent.
So depending on your setup, you might be better off.
Burning a tad faster.


#6

Thank you for you answer =)

After reading around it seems this could be caused by many various reasons. I’m going to try and copy again, uncompressed this time and burn at 16x instead of 10x, as you said, if it’s possible with my burner. I’m not sure what the best setup is for EAC though.


#7

Hi,[QUOTE=Marielle;2579854]
I copied some game music OSTs for my mother (she wants the “slow” songs only, so thats why) and noticed that the copy sounded thin compared to the original.[/quote]Did you use the same speakers (or headphones) for that comparison (copy sounds different from the original)?

I used EAC (compressed the files to .flac) and burned using Burrrn. The blank media is those JVC Taiyo Yuden.
So, an audio CD was the intended target format? In that case, the FLAC compression during the ripping process was unnecessary, but audio quality should not be affected since FLAC is lossless.

I had to burn at 10x because it didn’t seem like my burner could write at a slower speed, could this be the cause or why does it sound thin when it’s an exact copy?
Speed shouldn’t affect audio output, unless your CD writer is poor. In that case, you most likely would have playback problems in general.

ASSUMING (verification needed) that the same speaker setup was used to playback original and copy, there might be some significant difference between original and copy, which could not be egalized by the ripping/burning process. The original file might be something else than the usual CDDA compatible 16bit, 44.1 kHz stereo audio format. Check the properties of that file, please.

Michael


#8

Yes I used the same speakers for the comparison, and yes the copy sounds less dynamic than the original.

Yes, compressing to flac was really unnecessary. I don’t remember why I did that =S

I have had playback problems (skipping) with other cd-r when burning with this burner, but those TY works fine so far. I don’t know how this writer is, it’s a LG HL-DT-ST DVDRAM GSA-T20N.

How do I check if the original cd is CDDA compatible 16bit, 44.1 kHz stereo audio?

I have tried to convince myself this morning that i’m just imagining, but I’m not. I remember using EAC “paranoid” when copying because for some reason I couldn’t get all the tracks to copy with 100% track quality without it. I copied some of the files, uncompressed, again today (without paranoid) and burned them with 16x and I think it sounds more like the original now. But if the write speed doesn’t matter then I must be imagining.

Sorry for my English =)


#9

[QUOTE=Marielle;2580481] How do I check if the original cd is CDDA compatible 16bit, 44.1 kHz stereo audio? [/QUOTE]
I have dbPowerAmp & it will check Audio properties by just hovering the mouse.
VLC player will give this information using Tools/Codec Information.
You need to select open disc & Audio disc Play.

I have used Burrrn but it can have problems , I know my Vista OS doesn’t like it . I do use it occasionally to increase volume with replay gain .I usually write to a CD -RW till it sounds right & then to CD -R . So I can’t tell what replay gain settings will work for you.

EAC also has the capability to burn an Audio CD.

I usually use ImgBurn myself. Create a .cue form your EAC rip. Make the settings you want . Then burn the CD -R using the .cue file in Write mode.


#10

Thank you for your answer.

I’d like to use EAC for burning, but since I’m copying some, and not all, tracks from different disks and then burning them into one disk, I don’t know how to make the cue. I don’t think I will be able to make my own, I need EAC to make the cue for me.


#11

You can make a .cue with ImgBurn . You need to rip the CD with EAC to your hard drive as .wav files. ImgBurn can use .flac but you need to add the correct codec. So you can try some one of your .flac files.If it doesn’t give an error then ImgBurn will create the .cue with .flac also.
In ImgBurn you need to add the Performer & title manually. If you toggle between File Name & Custom it will put in the song title.
You will need to do this with each track (song).
You want to end up with Custom selected.
You also want the CD Text Both set on Custom.
You can put any .wav track in the .cue & as many as will add up the the maximum CD-R length. So this will let you make the mixed track .cue you need.
Of course ImgBurn will write this cue if you want to use it.
EAC is also able to use this cue.
Select Tools / Write CD-R . Then Load Cue Sheet.
Since ImgBurn puts the old track number with the song title you may want to edit that out of the .cue . You can do the by selecting Edit Cue Sheet.

Before the cue would have this:
FILE “K:\TEST WAVS\ELVIS PRESLEY\09 - Kentucky Rain.wav” WAVE
REM FILE-DECODED-SIZE 03:15:40
TRACK 02 AUDIO
PREGAP 00:02:00
TITLE "09 - Kentucky Rain"
PERFORMER "ELVIS"
INDEX 01 00:00:00

After edit it would be this:
FILE “K:\TEST WAVS\ELVIS PRESLEY\09 - Kentucky Rain.wav” WAVE
TRACK 02 AUDIO
TITLE "Kentucky Rain"
PERFORMER "ELVIS"
PREGAP 00:02:00
INDEX 01 00:00:00
When you have the cue the way you want it Select CD-R/Write CD
In the CD Write Options Window
Select your Write Speed
Write Mode No Test Write
The Make It So.
It should have a CD Write window & begin the Write.
Close Mode Close CD


#12

Thank you, I will try to make a cue with ImgBurn =)


#13

Please post if you were able to make a cue that worked for you .
And if this gave you better sound quality.


#14

Oh sorry for not answering earlier. It was very easy to make a cue file with ImgBurn =) I then used EAC this time to burn and now it sounds great! My guess is that Burrrn doesn’t work well with Vista.


#15

Thanks for the update Marielle .

[QUOTE=cholla;2580525]
I have used Burrrn but it can have problems , I know my Vista OS doesn’t like it . I do use it occasionally to increase volume with replay gain .I usually write to a CD -RW till it sounds right & then to CD -R .[/QUOTE]

[QUOTE=Marielle;2581336] My guess is that Burrrn doesn’t work well with Vista.[/QUOTE]
I also have Vista .
I only use Burrrn when I need it for a project that it will do better.
I would like to tell you how to use it but it is not consistent in the “fix” .
Usually a combination of checking or unchecking these in Settings/General will work . That’s why I test with a CD -RW till it sounds correct .



#16

[QUOTE=zebadee;2580414]Hi :slight_smile:
Yes & no.
It depends on how good your set up is.
Most programs involving compression will have some loss.
Personally I tend to think of lossless as losing less than others. :wink:
[/QUOTE]

Just for the record:

This is not true for lossless. As an example Zip or Rar are forms of lossless compression, it is known as a “wrapper” that wraps around the data. When extracted (or decompressed) the data will be 1:1 (exactly) the same byte for byte.

Lossy compression works very differently, with that there is always data loss as it throws out data to make the file smaller.