Thermal paste application

Surfing the web I found an interesting article.

Everybody know that for a correct CPU cooling the heatsink is not sufficient, but also a thermal paste must be used.

There are many reviews about which thermal paste is better or not, but what about how to apply the paste?

Whoever is interested, can read the article here :slight_smile:

Good find Geno, This should help many to see that more is not better but how you spread it.

Nice one Geno888.

I have always spread a thin (as thin as you can) layer over the whole contact surface using a metal spreader (looks like a hockey stick almost) and have always gotten excellent temps.

I also rub some into the heat sync with my finger in a plastic baggie and then wipe it off with a lint free cloth to get the TIM in the crevices but it you lap your heat sync I suppose that’s really not needed.

I always use Arctic Silver (for CPU’s) and Arctic Ceramic (for GPU’s), it’s never let me down yet.

Good stuff Geno888. This should be a must read for people building their own.

@MegaDETH. Definitely can’t complain about Arctic Silver. Been using AS Ceramic for years.:iagree:

I must confess that until now I never installed a CPU (my current mainboard was installed by my brother), but my next purchase will be installed by me (fingers crossed :bigsmile:)

Put a small “drop” of it (about half the size of a water drop is a good start) and use a credit card (or similar) to spread it across the heat spreader. Keep in mind that its supposed to make the surface smooth not act as a layer which means in other words that you should have it really thin. Be sure to wipe off any excessive paste and dont get it on other components.
//Danne

Exactly! Last year I removed a chip and ended up getting a tiny amount of paste on the socket. Then I tried to clean it off with a soft brush and isopropyl.:disagree: Asus was nice enough to replace the board for me.:bigsmile:

[QUOTE=DiiZzY;2043023]Put a small “drop” of it (about half the size of a water drop is a good start) and use a credit card (or similar) to spread it across the heat spreader. [B]Keep in mind that its supposed to make the surface smooth not act as a layer[/B] which means in other words that you should have it really thin. Be sure to wipe off any excessive paste and dont get it on other components.
//Danne[/QUOTE]

I thought that the thermal paste purpose was indeed to create a layer between the CPU and the heatsink to improve the heat exchange.

I just learn a new thing. Thanks DiiZzY :slight_smile:

[QUOTE=geno888;2043573]I thought that the thermal paste purpose was indeed to create a layer between the CPU and the heatsink to improve the heat exchange.

I just learn a new thing. Thanks DiiZzY :)[/QUOTE]

actually if the paste is too thick it will act like a blanket over the CPU and hold in the heat :eek: the main purpose of the paste is to fill in any minute air voids between the surfaces

I bought a tube of Arctic Silver today :bigsmile:

I read about many people talking very good about this, so when I saw it in the store I bought it immediately :eek:

[QUOTE=geno888;2043686]I bought a tube of Arctic Silver today :bigsmile:
[/QUOTE]

I bought some too. It drops my CPU temperature by 3-4C compared
to ordinary white heatsink compound.

I use Arctic Silver 5 too. It does a good job from what I see from the temperature readings for my CPUs. also, as jwill stated, the purpose of the paste is to fill the air voids with the thermal paste. The heat sink material to CPU contact is the best way to dissipate heat from the CPU. Air is a very poor thermal conductor and therefore the reason it needs displaced by the thermal paste but the thermal paste should not be so excessive that it also comes between the CPU and heat sink material.