The real dimension of a movie

What I know about the history of magnetic and optical media (VHS, CD, DVD, Blu-ray and so on) is that they’ve all been invented to perfectly fit data and movies.

I do not own any sort of Blu-ray device, but I know that even with 25 GiB (single layer) and 50 GiB (dual layer) the movie has to be compressed with the MPEG-2 algorithm.

So my question is:

how much space would be needed to fit an uncompressed movie ??? (where uncompressed means the same framerate, audio etc… that are shot by the camera in the movie studio).

There’s no answer to this question, since movies are generally shot on film with analog sound. The newest standard for telecine transfers is called “4K”. That would translate to 4096x4096 resolution. You can do the math, figuring 24 frames per second and then adding the audio stream(s). I come up with something in excess of 50MB per second. That’s 175GB per hour minimum, and probably some more.

HD video, at 1920x1080 is obviously considerably less. Probably on the order of 6 MB/sec (not bits). Something like 20GB per hour, plus audio.

Math is not my strong suit, all those numbers could be way off.

Thank you for the clear answer. :smiley:

So my next doubt is about the 4K-to-HD ratio. 4096x4096 gets no natural number in result if divided by 1920x1080 … so how are compression and resizing handled?

O_o

For example:

Uncompressed, a 12-bit RGB 4K raw image would require 1313MB/sec of data bandwidth and about 3 TB of storage for practical use.

:cool::cool:

So a movie would weigh 1313 MB/s ? Lol…

and what are the best compression algorithms available?

Is MPEG-2 layer 5 coming up or it’s just a legend?

[QUOTE=Tyreksionibus;2195901]So a movie would weigh 1313 MB/s ? Lol…

and what are the best compression algorithms available?

Is MPEG-2 layer 5 coming up or it’s just a legend?[/QUOTE]

Those numbers are for a raw 4k transfer. In mastering for video, that’s down-res to 1920x1080, or to DVD res of 720x480. The various iterations of MPEG-4 are the best for high picture quality at lower bit rates. MPEG-2 will produce just as good an image, but at a much higher bitrate, maybe 4x higher.

FWIW, the Japanese are working on a 2k standard for hi-def displays and TV. That would be on the order of what you would see in a average sized theater that uses a digital projector.

This is a couple years old, but have a look through it.

Encoding for HD DVD and Blu-ray Disc White Paper

http://www.digitalvision.se/resources/documents/Encoding_for_HD_DVD_and_Blu-ray_Disc.pdf

:cool::cool: