The real Cinavia cure

vbimport

#1

Get a DVD player :stuck_out_tongue: which can cost $10-$20 bucks (convert the video to DVD format) , or try Media Streamers with USB slots…
Bluray players are the only devices that condone and detect this parasite so
Why are people resorting to circumventing cinavia?..this is
not only a waste of time but simply unnecessary. Pay up to $60 or more just to be able to reconvert the videos
to make them cinavia free. (and that’s still in pending) What people will do to play movies on a PS3…lol. One thing I been hearing is…
“I like the PS3 movie playback experience” (tried jailbreak?) Well it turns out there is a device out there called:
“Sony Streaming Media Player - Black (SMPN200)” This media player plays all formats and no cinavia whatsoever. And has online browser with available video/music services.
and functions just like the PS3…I would check it out!
Folks, we need to boycott cinavia infected machines…just say NO!
Demand your money back for an intentional faulty product. There are better choices out there.


#2

The SONY SMP-N200 is a formidable player, with a few quirks. On the SONY store site and others, it’s now $49…or was a month ago. If you like the SONY DOS-like nav (or can spend a little time getting used to it), you will be surprised. Sadly, it’s not perfect…but if you can install Serviio (free version), it works very well…sadly, there is one setting config that bricked 2 of these for me…the default video settings…my advice is to leave them on DEFAULT…especially if using with AVR/5.1 setup and monitor (instead of HDTV)…I tried setting default to HD and the device locked up. SONY tech support tried to help, and even google searches found some workarounds that failed.

I miss it, but have been using the WDTV Live box (similar, and reduced price from $99 to $69?)…regular firmware updates have made it work very well, and with Windows shares, it rocks. Config is a learning curve, but is worth it. Will play most (if not all) formats, incl full BD REMUX and ISO’s without stuttering…trust me, my old laptop on-board vid choked on this…HDMI on my setup lacks audio (much troubleshooting), so i have HDMI vid and TOSlink audio in the AVR…amazing, amazing, amazing :smiley:


#3

This is kind of silly. All BD player must have Cinavia detection if they are made from 2012 and beyond. Except for Sony player, any BD player made prior to this will not have Cinavia detection. There is FAR too much being made about Cinavia by people who don’t understand it or how to get around it and don’t have any hands-on experience with it. Relax, and continue to enjoy your pre-2012 BD player. Thus far only Sony is routinely releasing BD titles with Cinavia and there’s no indication that other studios will ever do so. It costs them a lot of money to use Cinavia on a BD release, don’t expect them to be eager to spend it.


#4

How many of those media players play bd hd audio formats?
The easiest way is copy main movie part of BD, leaving the HD audio as it is.
I really don’t care for all that configuring stuff, they should make it so it works
without jumping through hoops or otherwise monkeying around with it just to get it to work as it should to start with.
As I see it, any kind of media player ought to play dvd and BD files without taking a studying course. All the other video file formats are not original anyhow.
I wouldn’t mind getting one as long as it will play BD m2ts files and vob or mpg DVD files…as far as I am concerned those 2 are the pure source.


#5

There is many more player that are infected. If you didn’t know already.


#6

[QUOTE=Dr. Who;2662622]There is many more player that are infected. If you didn’t know already.[/QUOTE]

“…the licensing agreements for AACS were finalized, which were updated to make Cinavia detection on commercial Blu-ray disc players a requirement.”

If you know of a player that that detects cinavia…and this player has [B]no[/B] [B]bluray[/B] [B]drive[/B]…please tell us which it is.

Best Regards.

:smiley:


#7

^Its a bit of cheating, but almost all of the commercial software players that can playback blu ray movies from discs now have Cinavia. Only Corel is behind in updating their player, and of course, DVDFab will never add Cinavia detection to their player.

A software player may exist on a computer that has no blu ray drive, and yet it will detect Cinavia on any type of file that has it added in, and thus stop playback.


#8

[QUOTE=Macrovision3500;2662705]"…the licensing agreements for AACS were finalized, which were updated to make Cinavia detection on commercial Blu-ray disc players a requirement."

If you know of a player that that detects cinavia…and this player has [B]no[/B] [B]bluray[/B] [B]drive[/B]…please tell us which it is.

Best Regards.

:D[/QUOTE]

I read wrong I thought the WD players added it but guess not?

http://forum.slysoft.com/showthread.php?t=41885&highlight=Cinavia


#9

I certainly hope so. Cinavia sounds like a real PITA. I wish I had gotten a BD player a few years ago when this stupid, non-sense DRM didn’t exist. However, i still don’t have a BD player, as I’m a little too broke to buy one. Now, however, I’m not sure weather I even should get one.


#10

Get a wd player.


#11

I agree with Dr. Who. Buy a media player.

Rip your blu ray to the hard drive on your computer and transfer them to the media player. DRM bypassed.


#12

Need to add get Slysoft’s AnyDVD HD.


#13

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2662746]I agree with Dr. Who. Buy a media player.

Rip your blu ray to the hard drive on your computer and transfer them to the media player. DRM bypassed.[/QUOTE] The problem with this approach is, that embedded Cinavia is a ticking time-bomb that will explode if your media player (or TV or Receiver or whatever else the signal goes through) gets “updated” to include Cinavia protection later on.

So the only REAL cure is to not buy any media with Cinavia infection.


#14

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2662811]… (or TV or Receiver or whatever else the signal goes through) gets “updated” to include Cinavia protection later on.[/QUOTE]

It wouldn’t surprise if this happens next. At the moment, all TVs need HDCP support to connect your Blu-ray player, cable/satellite HD box or any other set-top box that requires HDCP, so it’s quite possible that in the future, for a TV manufacturer to implement HDCP, it must also detect Cinavia in the audio. For example, if it detects the Cinavia watermark in either the HDMI audio or a concealed microphone and HDCP is missing, then it freezes the picture with the Cinavia message. :doh:


#15

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2662811]The problem with this approach is, that embedded Cinavia is a ticking time-bomb that will explode if your media player (or TV or Receiver or whatever else the signal goes through) gets “updated” to include Cinavia protection later on.

So the only REAL cure is to not buy any media with Cinavia infection.[/QUOTE]

Very unlikely scenario. the only reason we have Cinavia detection on BD players is because Sony forced it into the BDA’s licensing requirements. They have no such political muscle in the other areas of the industry. Further, Cinavia protection codes (the audio watermark) are specifically keyed to the type of media the content is released on, ie: BD discs, and should only trigger the protection in BD players.

The studios are actively avoiding the paying of Cinavia licensing fees on new BD releases, only Sony is using it right now. It’s very much a cost-vs-benefit situation and studios won’t jump on this bandwagon unless it can be demonstrated it will SAVE them money.

It does appear that Cinavia might stop the hoards of “rip and burn” pirates in China and elsewhere, but only time will tell if they find a way around it. It’s possible, in theory, to burn an AACS encrypted BD disc that will not trigger the protection. If that happens, then the motivation for studios to pay for Cinavia is significantly reduced.

In any case, full scale adoption of Cinavia protection even in BD movies is years away. The vast majority of consumers are still using players which ignore it.

It’s just as likely that Cinavia will see a slow lingering death just as most of Sony’s bright ideas do.


#16

Posted by CDan
It’s just as likely that Cinavia will see a slow lingering death just as most of Sony’s bright ideas do.<!-- google_ad_section_end -->

Anyone remember Betamax:bigsmile::bigsmile:


#17

[QUOTE=CDan;2662853]Further, Cinavia protection codes (the audio watermark) are specifically keyed to the type of media the content is released on, ie: BD discs, and should only trigger the protection in BD players.[/QUOTE]

The very outdated list of discs with Cinavia included over at Slysoft shows that Cinavia has also been added to a few dvds. Any hardware or software player that has Cinavia enabled will shut down playback with copies of these also.

I agree with CDan that it is really quite unlikely to see Cinavia enabled in TV’s and media players. The manufacturers might as well cut their own throats. There is no incentive for them to do this.


#18

[QUOTE=CDan;2662853]It’s just as likely that Cinavia will see a slow lingering death just as most of Sony’s bright ideas do.[/QUOTE] Let’s hope so.

…but I’m still gonna avoid buying Blu-rays and DVDs infected with Cinavia.

BTW I have just transferred EVERYTHING to a NAS so that I can play it from my media player and will not be playing optical discs anymore if it can be avoided.


#19

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2662912]Let’s hope so.

…but I’m still gonna avoid buying Blu-rays and DVDs infected with Cinavia.

BTW I have just transferred EVERYTHING to a NAS so that I can play it from my media player and will not be playing optical discs anymore if it can be avoided.[/QUOTE]
You dont have to worry, they havent made any pron with Cinavia yet.:bigsmile::bigsmile:


#20

“Incentive”. Ah. Like Sony paying studios oodles of money to either exclusively put their films on BluRay and avoid HD… or Sony paying them less but still paying them if studios would put films onto BluRays first, and delaying HD Disk shipments.

Yes. Those kind of incentives never work! That’s why HD Disks are soooo popular. “There’s no incentive to force everyone to pay Sony-Philips a license fee for their BluRay technology patents!”

Uh. I think there are huge incentives for a company who can get a per-item-sold fee. It will be like a transaction fee, eventually. “Plug it in, pay a fee. We SEE you playing MY disk!”

Holy DRM, Batman. Y’mean, THAT kind of incentive?!!

Just remember that MasterCard and Visa didn’t make their kajillions off of interest payments. They made it off the teeny penny-per-transaction fee when every Connect Request hit their phone centers.