The rarest/most obscure recordable medium

[QUOTE=hollykryten;2777206]I had been looking carefully.[/QUOTE]

Not carefully enough.

These seem to be the disks used in the old French study. From what i gather they’re not easy to come by anymore: http://www.ebay.com/itm/191800279294

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New arrivals.

Maxell CD-R80 XL.\Ritek ATIP\MID: 97m15s17f










Today’s ULTRA rare media.

Pioneer RDD-74A CD-R for Consumer Digital Audio
Made in Japan by Pioneer Video Corporation
ATIP = 97m 27s 33f
Gold reflective layer, cyanine dye

Yes, I finally got my hands on some incredibly hard to find Pioneer gold/cyanine CD-Rs. Word has it that these early Pioneer CD-R products were not great in terms of compatibility with different writers. The dye colour is a lovely shade of blue, seen as dark green with a golden background hue when combined with the gold reflective layer. Pioneer adopted a silver reflective layer for their CD-R products with a revised cyanine dye as early as 1997.





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I assume you got these from a very recent ebay auction, as I picked up his last one out of 5. Wish I had seen it sooner and got all of them. =) Just waiting on the shipping currently.

Does anyone know the difference between the Pioneer RDD-60 and RDD-60A?

[QUOTE=terminalvelocd;2742260]The Pioneer CD-Rs of old were actually very high quality discs with an amazing level of construction. They were very durable and had a very thick reflective layer that was not prone to peeling like even Taiyo Yuden CD-Rs. The 60min product is extremely rare and actually, any Pioneer CD-R with a gold reflective layer is rare.[/QUOTE]

My RDD-60 peeled rather quickly actually (maybe within 5 years) but the RDD-74A had a toughcoat on top which looks unpeelable.

No, that won’t do. People like me and [B]xeriax[/B] need their fix too!

I picked up 34 pieces of RDD-74A from of this seller along with 6 pieces of RDD-60.

Does anyone know the difference between the Pioneer RDD-60 and RDD-60A?

I think the RDD-60 is older than RDD-60A.

[QUOTE=terminalvelocd;2777910]No, that won’t do. People like me and [B]xeriax[/B] need their fix too!

I picked up 34 pieces of RDD-74A from of this seller along with 6 pieces of RDD-60.

I think the RDD-60 is older than RDD-60A.[/QUOTE]

Stands to reason that the “A” is the newer version. Just wondering what might be the difference. I assume this is a question that is impossible to answer. Might be compatibility related.

Any chance you’d be willing to share some photos of your RDD-60 (front and back of actual disc)? And any chance you’d be willing to part with one? :wink: I haven’t had any luck finding them.

[QUOTE=JHow77;2777930]Stands to reason that the “A” is the newer version. Just wondering what might be the difference. I assume this is a question that is impossible to answer. Might be compatibility related.[/QUOTE]

They’re exactly the same discs with exactly the same construction (gold reflective layer, cyanine dye) and the same ATIP. The only difference would be the label on the disc.

Today’s rare media.

Fujifilm CD-R74 12X
Made in Japan by Fuji Photo Film Company Limited
ATIP = 97m 26s 40f
Silver reflective layer, cyanine dye

One of Japan’s lesser-known CD-R manufacturers was Fujifilm. This 12X product represents the very last of the Fujifilm-made CD-Rs, with later Fujifilm-branded products outsourced to manufacturers like Taiyo Yuden, Ritek and Prodisc. Fujifilm’s cyanine dye has a distinct bright green colour that no other CD-R manufacturer’s cyanine dye can match. The dye colour makes the recording side appear similar to that of older cyanine CD-Rs with gold reflective layers.




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To quote terminalvelocd, “Today’s ultra rare media” =)

TDK CD-RXG60
Made in Japan by TDK Corporation
ATIP = 97m 49s 00f
Gold reflective layer, Cyanine Azo dye

According to terminalvelocd this is extremely rare, and it’s absolutely crazy how I came upon it. Less than two weeks ago I decided to go to Google and type “60min CD-R” but thinking I was wasting my time. On the 2nd or 3rd page of results there was a company that said it “1 in-stock.” It was some electronics warehouse. I assumed this had been sitting on their shelf collecting dust for almost 20 years and thought for sure it wasn’t really available. I added it to my cart and it brought me to the check-out page. I still thought this wasn’t gonna happen and wondered how quickly I was going to get my money back once they told me it wasn’t really available. Low and behold I received an email the same day saying they had shipped it! I think even more shocking than finding it is that they were still asking what I assume to be MSRP from the late '90s - $23.95. Worth every penny! Kudos to this company holding out to get their money for over 20 years. =)






Taiyo Yuden ATIP\MID: 97m24s01f




[QUOTE=JHow77;2778325]Gold reflective layer, Cyanine Azo dye[/QUOTE]

Definitely a cyanine dye. TDK’s own advertisements even stated that their CD-R products of the time used a ‘high sensitivity cyanine dye’. The only CD-R media manufacturer that uses Azo dye, even to this day, is Mitsubishi/Verbatim.

[QUOTE=terminalvelocd;2778374]Definitely a cyanine dye. TDK’s own advertisements even stated that their CD-R products of the time used a ‘high sensitivity cyanine dye’. The only CD-R media manufacturer that uses Azo dye, even to this day, is Mitsubishi/Verbatim.[/QUOTE]

I wondered the same thing. Nero must’ve been reporting generic info. Quick question - is there such a thing as “the best” ATIP?

[QUOTE=JHow77;2778391]I wondered the same thing. Nero must’ve been reporting generic info. Quick question - is there such a thing as “the best” ATIP?[/QUOTE]

The reasoning behind this is because ATIP readers use the last digit of the ATIP code to report the dye formulation type. If the last digit of the ATIP is from 0-4, a long strategy (i.e. cyanine, azo) dye is reported. If the last digit of the ATIP is 5-9, a short strategy (i.e. phthalocyanine) dye is reported.

There is no such thing as ‘the best’ ATIP. Each manufacturer is allocated at least one ‘block’ with 10 frames. Let me use TDK as an example. TDK have three ‘blocks’ of ATIPs: 97m15s00f -> 97m15s09f, 97m32s00f -> 97m32s09f and 97m49s00f -> 97m49s09f. TDK uses (used) all three blocks: the first for 80-minute CD-Rs, the second for 74-minute CD-Rs and the third for 60/63-minute CD-Rs. Over the years, TDK has produced three CD-R dye types: two cyanine (‘0’ and ‘1’) and one phthalocyanine (‘5’).

So using the above information, a TDK-manufactured CD-R with ATIP = 97m32s00f would be a 74-minute CD-R with the oldest dark blue cyanine dye with either a gold or silver reflective layer (the ATIP didn’t change when the transition was made from gold to silver).

It should also be noted that TDK’s first-generation 80-minute CD-Rs (8X) were ATIP = 97m25s00f for whatever reason.

And in addition, some manufacturers may use the nominal capacity to determine the speed variation of the CD-R. For example, Taiyo Yuden does this to differentiate their low-speed CD-Rs from their high-speed CD-Rs.

Today’s ULTRA rare media.

Marantz CD-R74 Professional Audio
Made in Japan by Taiyo Yuden Company Limited
ATIP = 97m 24s 00f
Gold reflective layer, cyanine dye

So, another shipment of discs arrived from Japan this morning. In it was a good quantity of these Marantz Digital Audio CD-Rs made by Taiyo Yuden. Taiyo Yuden CD-Rs with gold reflective layers rare enough, but Digital Audio varieties are even rarer. Gorgeous!



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Today’s rare media.

Kodak Gold Ultima Inkjet Printable White 1X-8X
Made in Mexico by Kodak de Mexico S.A. de C.V.
ATIP = 97m 27s 45f
Gold reflective layer, phthalocyanine dye

White retail Kodak Ultima / Gold Ultima CD-R products generally had either Kodak-branded or unbranded matte thermal printable top surfaces, bulk orders could be made with various other specifications such as thermal printable white or inkjet printable white. Such products came packs of 30 in plain brown cardboard boxes, packs of 50 in white cakebox spindle with screw top or packs of 100 in shrink wrap in cartons of 600 and weren’t popular with the masses due to them not being available at retail level.



Today’s rare media.

Kodak Digital Science (ds) “Type F” 1X-8X
Made in Mexico by Kodak de Mexico S.A. de C.V.
ATIP = 97m 27s 47f
Gold reflective layer, formazan dye

Kodak produced CD-R media using their patented formazan dye between 1997 and 2000. PC-use CD-Rs using this dye type were discontinued in late-1998 with production subsequently limited to CD-R for Audio discs. Kodak’s formazan media suffered from poorer compatibility compared to their mainstream phthalocyanine media but there were still many drives that could write to this media with excellent quality results. Kodak’s formazan CD-Rs could be distinguished by their dark green recording side, whereas the recording side of Kodak phthalocyanine media appears the same colour as the reflective layer.