The Best DVD RW for Audio Ripping

vbimport

#1

My Asus Litescribe 1814BL crapped out on me… EAC simply wont rip from it…

In Sri Lanka we only have Samsung, LG, Sony & possibly Liteon…

So out of the above which should I buy that fits the below 2 things…

  1. The overall best DVD Writer ?
  2. Best DVD writer for Audio Ripping ?

thanx


#2

Hi and Welcome!

I would go with the LG, provided these are the models with Renesas chipset (latest with Sata: GH20 series, P-Ata GSA-H44), then with the Samsung.
Sony does only repackage drives from other manufacturers, and I personally don’t like the CD-R performance of Liteon drives.

Michael


#3

It depends on how much of a perfectionist you are. Any decent drive should be able to do basic audio ripping accurately (especially with EAC) but if you care about offset correction then you want a drive with a small offset value to minimize the number of samples you “lose” at the end of the disc (they always read as zeros). My Lite-On LH-20A1S works well overall for audio ripping and has an offset of 6, which is the smallest I’ve seen.

On the other hand, Lite-On drives don’t read the disc’s catalog number correctly, so if you care about that (e.g. for a cuesheet embedded in a FLAC file of the whole CD) you should use a different drive.


#4

[QUOTE=mciahel;2078128]Hi and Welcome!

I would go with the LG, provided these are the models with Renesas chipset (latest with Sata: GH20 series, P-Ata GSA-H44), then with the Samsung.
Sony does only repackage drives from other manufacturers, and I personally don’t like the CD-R performance of Liteon drives.

Michael[/QUOTE]

What is it that you don’t like about CD burning/ripping with lite-on (read Sony)
drives? I have about 400 CDs that I ripped and burned with a Sony Crx230ae
that came out with very low C1 errors and sound very good. I realize jitter is the “big bug” in audio ripping/burning but I don’t hear a difference between the copy and the original. I am presently ripping a pile of my CDs (to try to archive in Flac) with an LG drive and bought a cheap 240a Plextor to help with the work. With the price of hard drives dropping so low I am wondering if it is even worth it to bother encoding in FLAC. The time invested in the learning curve would be worth a few terrabytes of hard drive space!


#5

I wouldn’t want to use an LG drive for audio ripping, btw. The one in my laptop, a GSA-4080N, has a read offset of 667 samples, which is fairly large, and if you try to do offset correction it reports read errors at the end of the disc rather than silently returning zeros like most drives do. It’s also rather slow at DAE.

According to the table of offsets on the AccurateRip site, the GH20 and GSA-H44 drives have a 667-sample offset as well, so I’d imagine they probably behave the same way. I’ll stick with my LH-20A1S and its six-sample offset. :slight_smile:

(Actually, my LH-20A1S broke recently – still reads fine, but burns bad DVDs – and it’s out of warranty, so I’m about to buy another one of the same model, as well as a Samsung SH-S203B to avoid having a monoculture of nothing but Lite-On drives.)

Regarding FLAC, I do it not so much for space savings, but because it supports embedding a cuesheet, so I can make a nice clean CD backup with a single big FLAC file containing all the tracks and the boundaries between them. (That’s just for archival; I make Vorbis files for actually listening to.)