That Cuddly Kitty Is Deadlier Than You Think

vbimport

#1

ll concur that pet cats should not be allowed to prowl around the neighborhood at will, any more than should a pet dog, horse or potbellied pig, and that cat owners who insist their felines “deserve” a bit of freedom are being irresponsible and ultimately not very cat friendly. Through recent projects like Kitty Cams at the University of Georgia, in which cameras are attached to the collars of indoor–outdoor pet cats to track their activities, not only have cats been filmed preying on cardinals, frogs and field mice, they’ve been shown lapping up antifreeze and sewer sludge, dodging under moving cars and sparring violently with much bigger dogs.

“We’ve put a lot of effort into trying to educate people that they should not let their cats outside, that it’s bad for the cats and can shorten the cats’ lives,” said Danielle Bays, the manager of the community cat programs at the Washington Humane Society.

Yet the new study estimates that free-roaming pets account for only about 29 percent of the birds and 11 percent of the mammals killed by domestic cats each year, and the real problem arises over how to manage the 80 million or so stray or feral cats that commit the bulk of the wildlife slaughter.

I am sorry but the reason I got my cats was there were to many mice,rats,and chipmunks so I let them do what they should do kill kill.
If you do not want your mice or rats killed keep them inside.


#2

a friend who got some cats to supress the mice population on his farm complained that the cats went after the gold finches that came to his wife’s bird feeder and isgnored mice, Squirrels and rabbits.

I dealt with the cats knowing what they should do to Rabbits and squirrels
in a single afternoon… it may sound cruel and cold but give a cat a “not quite dead yet” squirrel or Rabbit and they figuire out what to do with it very quickly.

a little switch in their cat brain goes from curiosity mode, “what is that thing over there that runs away before I can get a close look at it?” to “Stalk, Pounce & KILL!” mode “Hey! I see DINNER of FRESH MEAT over there!” and after that they are considerably more motivated to catch it. And you really don’t need to show them much at all after that…

If you have a “colony” of cats (like on a farm) and you teach one or two the rest pickup on the idea suprisingly quickly

I explained that kittens learn from their mothers what they are supposed to prey upon OR learn by accident that “the moving thing that attracted their attention was actually made of meat when they bit it too hard while playing with it”

I learned myself long ago that you cannot depend entirely on “luck” or for Mamma cat to teach her new baby killers what to chase after…

So I take that responsibility upon myself.

I needed to show my Ginger Tom Manx who was well instructed about what rabbits are for by his mother that squirrels were worth chasing too… I needed one freshly dead squirrel and a sharp knife.

I needed to show that cat ONCE that squirrels were made of meat…
He took one sniff of that squirrel and started his “Hey, it’s MINE you GAVE it to me growl”

My cat gave me a look as if to say “Why didn’t you tell me these
annoying furry things were made of meat before now?” and promptly became “Death in the trees” to the local squirrel population.

What was funny is that he also instructed several other cats that “Squirrels are good cat food” to several other cats I had
(serially, I’ve never had more than two cats at once)

Personally I liked him killing Rabbits, I am particularly fond of Romaine lettuce
and I can plant 10,000 feet of the stuff and not get so much as a shred to eat
unless I have a dedicated killer to guard the lettuce plants from the rabbits.

But after not getting a single hazelnut off of my dozen hazelnut bushes (in a year when they had been loaded with immature nuts before the squirrels got to them)
I was kinda ticked off at the squirrels…

Those furry tree rats were literally taking food out of my mouth!

To me while a cat is a “pet” (a useful foot warmer on a cold night)
it is also a useful TOOL when properly instructed in what I call
"The science of enlightened self interest"

Teaching a cat to do anything is difficult, but showing it something it really
wants to do, to the exclusion of nearly everything else, then turning
it loose can have some amusing results. (and is disturbingly easy)


#3

[QUOTE=samlar;2675227]http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/30/science/that-cuddly-kitty-of-yours-is-a-killer.html?hpw

ll concur that pet cats should not be allowed to prowl around the neighborhood at will, any more than should a pet dog, horse or potbellied pig, and that cat owners who insist their felines “deserve” a bit of freedom are being irresponsible and ultimately not very cat friendly. Through recent projects like Kitty Cams at the University of Georgia, in which cameras are attached to the collars of indoor–outdoor pet cats to track their activities, not only have cats been filmed preying on cardinals, frogs and field mice, they’ve been shown lapping up antifreeze and sewer sludge, dodging under moving cars and sparring violently with much bigger dogs.

“We’ve put a lot of effort into trying to educate people that they should not let their cats outside, that it’s bad for the cats and can shorten the cats’ lives,” said Danielle Bays, the manager of the community cat programs at the Washington Humane Society.

Yet the new study estimates that free-roaming pets account for only about 29 percent of the birds and 11 percent of the mammals killed by domestic cats each year, and the real problem arises over how to manage the 80 million or so stray or feral cats that commit the bulk of the wildlife slaughter.

I am sorry but the reason I got my cats was there were to many mice,rats,and chipmunks so I let them do what they should do kill kill.
If you do not want your mice or rats killed keep them inside.[/QUOTE]

So if we want our mice and rats to live bring them inside,won’t the cats get them?


#4

[QUOTE=marloyd;2675236]So if we want our mice and rats to live bring them inside,won’t the cats get them?[/QUOTE]
That’s what would happen at my house.

I have inside only cats & outside only cats.
That might not sound fair to the outside only cats.
To start with they arrived as strays & I started feeding them.
I also have a good insulated house for each outside cat.
They have a electric heated pad designed for an outside cat’s house in each. The pads are weight activated & don’t increase the electric bill much.

I actually liked having squirells around because I don’t have nut trees .
I used to even feed the squirrells. After I got the cats I no longer have any squirells come around . I no longer try to feed the squirells as that is just bait . These cats didn’t need any training . My guess is they were feral & had already learned to hunt to survive.

The study suprises me that a cat would drink antifreeze . Most cats seem to avoid anything sweet or the ones I’ve had do.


#5

[QUOTE=cholla;2675292]That’s what would happen at my house.

I have inside only cats & outside only cats.
That might not sound fair to the outside only cats.
To start with they arrived as strays & I started feeding them.
I also have a good insulated house for each outside cat.
They have a electric heated pad designed for an outside cat’s house in each. The pads are weight activated & don’t increase the electric bill much.

I actually liked having squirells around because I don’t have nut trees .
I used to even feed the squirrells. After I got the cats I no longer have any squirells come around . I no longer try to feed the squirells as that is just bait . These cats didn’t need any training . My guess is they were feral & had already learned to hunt to survive.

The study suprises me that a cat would drink antifreeze . Most cats seem to avoid anything sweet or the ones I’ve had do.[/QUOTE]

I used to call my bird feeders cat feeders now our cats stay in.


#6

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2675234]a friend who got some cats to supress the mice population on his farm complained that the cats went after the gold finches that came to his wife’s bird feeder and isgnored mice, Squirrels and rabbits.

I dealt with the cats knowing what they should do to Rabbits and squirrels
in a single afternoon… it may sound cruel and cold but give a cat a “not quite dead yet” squirrel or Rabbit and they figuire out what to do with it very quickly.

a little switch in their cat brain goes from curiosity mode, “what is that thing over there that runs away before I can get a close look at it?” to “Stalk, Pounce & KILL!” mode “Hey! I see DINNER of FRESH MEAT over there!” and after that they are considerably more motivated to catch it. And you really don’t need to show them much at all after that…

If you have a “colony” of cats (like on a farm) and you teach one or two the rest pickup on the idea suprisingly quickly

I explained that kittens learn from their mothers what they are supposed to prey upon OR learn by accident that “the moving thing that attracted their attention was actually made of meat when they bit it too hard while playing with it”

I learned myself long ago that you cannot depend entirely on “luck” or for Mamma cat to teach her new baby killers what to chase after…

So I take that responsibility upon myself.

I needed to show my Ginger Tom Manx who was well instructed about what rabbits are for by his mother that squirrels were worth chasing too… I needed one freshly dead squirrel and a sharp knife.

I needed to show that cat ONCE that squirrels were made of meat…
He took one sniff of that squirrel and started his “Hey, it’s MINE you GAVE it to me growl”

My cat gave me a look as if to say “Why didn’t you tell me these
annoying furry things were made of meat before now?” and promptly became “Death in the trees” to the local squirrel population.

What was funny is that he also instructed several other cats that “Squirrels are good cat food” to several other cats I had
(serially, I’ve never had more than two cats at once)

Personally I liked him killing Rabbits, I am particularly fond of Romaine lettuce
and I can plant 10,000 feet of the stuff and not get so much as a shred to eat
unless I have a dedicated killer to guard the lettuce plants from the rabbits.

But after not getting a single hazelnut off of my dozen hazelnut bushes (in a year when they had been loaded with immature nuts before the squirrels got to them)
I was kinda ticked off at the squirrels…

Those furry tree rats were literally taking food out of my mouth!

To me while a cat is a “pet” (a useful foot warmer on a cold night)
it is also a useful TOOL when properly instructed in what I call
"The science of enlightened self interest"

Teaching a cat to do anything is difficult, but showing it something it really
wants to do, to the exclusion of nearly everything else, then turning
it loose can have some amusing results. (and is disturbingly easy)[/QUOTE]

Hehe, I enjoyed reading that :slight_smile:

I don’t think my cat’s ever killed a rodent in his life…he’s too well fed at home for that (plus he’s a lazy smeg). :wink:


#7

Here’s the Scientific American take on it: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/culturing-science/2013/01/29/killer-cats/


#8

I figured this would get moved to the A cat a day keeps the dogs away post


#9

When I taught my cats about rabbits and squirrels they mostly lost interest in the birds (which are harder to catch, have less meat on them and have those annoying feathers)

One afternoon I told my mother that her long haired black cat Samson
(the long hair thing) had a bird. She asked “What kind of bird?”, I replied “It’s hard to say”, she asked “what? you don’t know?” I answered “No, I know the species name but it seems monumentally inappropriate considering the circumstances…”

She asked again, “Ok, what is the species name?” I answered deadpan: “a Swift, which this one obviously wasn’t…”

I also have to point out that Several times I’ve personally seen this particular cat slowly slink up to a Rabbit and literally pin the rabbit to the ground without any pounce at all… this cat was very fuzzy and jet black… even in good light
it was impossible to make human eyes focus on the outlines of this cat.
The only thing that were always visible were his big green eyes…

All my neighbor witnessed him doing the same exact thing on multiple occasions

One actually captured him doing it on his video camera
(sadly I don’t have a copy of the video)

Everyone swore he must be part “Cheshire Cat” because in anything other than direct sunlight he became practically invisible… your eyes would kinda slide right off of him and leave you thinking you had something in your eye or a blind spot.

He was probably the most gentle cat we’ve ever had, but unquestionably a killer.


#10

After only 5,000 years of research, scientists have discovered that animals kill other animals in nature, and that cats are predators… I wonder what they will discover next?! :doh:


#11

I be willing to bet Government paid someone to figure this out


#12

We don’t know which of the park cats have killed any of the kajillion doves in our park, but we find a carcass every week or two. Years ago, cats would present them to us on our back-steps, but now those are dragged off, near jasmine hedges instead, where the killer-cats do most of their hunting.

Yeah, our gov’t expenditures find the most startling claims. I can’t wait for the “without air, we can’t breathe!” study to be presented as a “shocking new find”. Probably only a few million for that one. Paid to a good friend of Congress or a Parlimentarian pal.

I’d love to see Spending be put on public referendums, especially elected officials’ budgets.


#13

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2675501]After only 5,000 years of research, scientists have discovered that animals kill other animals in nature, and that cats are predators… I wonder what they will discover next?! :doh:[/QUOTE]

Brought to us by the government that ran a million dollar study to invertigate if beans really do cause gas.


#14

my wife would want to do the study on beans causing gas since she says I have gas all the time and I like beans.


#15

You know, if you want to kill mice, rats, squirrels, ect., you should also consider getting a dog. Except for breed small enough to step on, most dogs are excellent hunters, and will likely work well in teams.

We once had a rat roaming around our kitchen. My dad, my cat, and my neighbors spent hours trying to catch it. The cat was completely useless, and the rat was smart enough to avoid the humans. The next day my Labrador managed to catch it within seconds, despite having a bad front leg!


#16

I was looked at like Osama Bin Laden going through security at the state of the union adress when I suggested that the proper way to pick a Jack Russell puppie was to bring a LIVE RAT to the dog breeder’s.

Remember that the Jack Russell Terrier was bred as a rat killer and that a properly bred one will kill a rat so quickly that unless you are watching with a high speed camera you will miss it…

Jack Russells are too high strung for most people, one friend I know who had one refered to it as a “Jack Russell Terrorist” (and often thought the dog was on PCP)