TerminalVeloCD's Reviews - RITEKG05 Maxell/RiDATA

vbimport

#1

G’day all,

This is the first of many reviews of DVD media I hope to complete in the near future. Up for test today are two types of RITEK 8x DVD-R media, sold by Maxell and RiDATA.

Note that the Maxell discs use A03 dye, as can be seen on the serial numbers printed on the hub of the discs, and the RiDATA discs use L23 dye.

Attached to this message are photos of the actual discs tested. Also attached is the media code output from DVDInfoPro.

Read on for the test results…


#2

In the first test, we used Nero CD-DVD Speed 3.80 to create a data disc using a piece of Maxell 8x DVD-R and the BenQ DW1620 Pro with B7V9 firmware with Walking-OPC disabled using QSuite. This test was done at the maximum supported speed of 8x and the data disc required 7min48sec to create. After the disc was created, it was scanned for PIE/PIF/POF/Jitter on the same drive at 8x and a transfer rate scan at 16x was performed using an NEC ND-3520A with 3.04 stock firmware. Attached are the results from this test.

As we can see, the PIF error levels are distributed evenly across the disc and these error levels are well within specification (Max = 16 for 8 ECC). However, PIE errors increase dramatically after the 2.8Gb mark after a pretty smooth start. On a positive note, jitter was fairly well controlled throughout the burn, with no major variations, and there were no POF errors recorded. The transfer rate scan showed that disc was difficult to read after the 2.9Gb mark.

Will there be any difference if BenQ’s Walking-OPC algorithm is enabled? We shall see in the following test…




#3

In the second test, we used Nero CD-DVD Speed 3.80 to create another data disc using a piece of Maxell 8x DVD-R and the BenQ DW1620 Pro with B7V9 firmware, but this time, we enabled Walking-OPC disabled using QSuite. This test was done at the maximum supported speed of 8x and the data disc required 8min8sec to create, the extra time taken was due to the Walking-OPC algorithm adjusting the laser in real time. After the disc was created, it was scanned for PIE/PIF/POF/Jitter on the same drive at 8x and a transfer rate scan at 16x was performed using an NEC ND-3520A with 3.04 stock firmware. Attached are the results from this test.

The first suprise when seeing the test results was an increase in PIE error errors compared to the first test. We expected the WOPC algorithm to adjust the writing laser so that errors of all types are reduced, however this is not the case. Jitter remained fairly constant throughout the disc, peaking at just 11.0%, and as another surprise, PIF errors dramatically decrease with WOPC enabled. According to the transfer rate test results, the disc written with WOPC enabled was slightly less difficult to read for the NEC drive.

Now we will test these discs using the NEC ND-3520A burner, renowned for producing high quality burns. How will the NEC stack up with the BenQ?




#4

In the third test, we used Nero CD-DVD Speed 3.80 to create another data disc using a piece of Maxell 8x DVD-R and the NEC ND-3520A with 3.04 firmware. This test was done at the maximum supported speed of 8x. The NEC required 9min48sec, nearly two minutes more than the BenQ to create a data disc at 8x due to it’s slower, less agressive Z-CLV write strategy, compared to P-CAV used by the BenQ. After the disc was created, it was scanned for PIE/PIF/POF/Jitter on the BenQ DW1620 Pro with B7V9 firmware at 8x and a transfer rate scan at 16x was performed using the NEC ND-3520A. Attached are the results from this test.

The first comment we can make about the burn on the NEC is the wildly varying jitter levels. The worst of the jitter occurs where the disc was recorded at 6x. This is a well-known problem with NEC drives dating as far back as the ND-2500A and despite this, NEC has still not corrected this issue with their current generation of drives. Thankfully, other error levels (especially PIE) were well within specification and surprisingly, even with the high jitter levels, the NEC produced a perfectly readback curve.




#5

In the fourth test, we used Nero CD-DVD Speed 3.80 to create a data disc using a piece or RiDATA DVD-R on the BenQ DW1620 Pro with B7V9 firmware with WOPC disabled. This test was done at the maximum supported speed of 8x and took 7min47sec to complete. After the disc was created, it was scanned for PIE/PIF/POF/Jitter on the same drive at 8x and a transfer rate scan at 16x was performed using an NEC ND-3520A with 3.04 stock firmware. Attached are the results from this test.

Unfortunately, the results from this test are far from satisfactory. PIE levels rise to worrying levels between the 0.5Gb and 1.8Gb marks and PIF actually exceeds DVD specifications and peaks at 24 between the 4Gb mark and the end of the session. Jitter remained consistant throughout the burn, however, but even then, the NEC ND-3520A had trouble reading the disc towards the end of the burn.

Again, what happens when we enable WOPC? Find out in the next test…


#6

In the fifth test, we used Nero CD-DVD Speed 3.80 to create another data disc using a piece of RiDATA DVD-R and the BenQ DW1620 Pro with B7V9 firmware, but this time, we enabled Walking-OPC disabled using QSuite. This test was done at the maximum supported speed of 8x and the data disc required 8min12sec to create, the extra time taken was due to the Walking-OPC algorithm adjusting the laser in real time. After the disc was created, it was scanned for PIE/PIF/POF/Jitter on the same drive at 8x and a transfer rate scan at 16x was performed using an NEC ND-3520A with 3.04 stock firmware. Attached are the results from this test.

The total number of PIE errors remained pretty much the same compared to the burn with WOPC disabled, however, instead of PIE peaking a 104, this time it peaked at only 64. With WOPC enabled, PIF error totals increased, and despite the laser recalibrating at various points during the burn, the maximum PIF spike was 20, well over the DVD specifications. The jitter average was excellent in this case, at only 8.67%. However, as the transfer rate test shows, some drives may have difficulty reading back this disc due to the high number of PIF errors towards the end of the burn.

Next we test these discs with the NEC ND-3520A.


#7

In the sixth and final test, we used Nero CD-DVD Speed 3.80 to create another data disc using a piece of RiDATA DVD-R and the NEC ND-3520A with 3.04 firmware. This test was done at the maximum supported speed of 8x. The NEC required 9min48sec, nearly two minutes more than the BenQ to create a data disc at 8x due to it’s slower, less agressive Z-CLV write strategy, compared to P-CAV used by the BenQ. After the disc was created, it was scanned for PIE/PIF/POF/Jitter on the BenQ DW1620 Pro with B7V9 firmware at 8x and a transfer rate scan at 16x was performed using the NEC ND-3520A. Attached are the results from this test.

The same rise in PIE error levels that occured with burns made with the BenQ drive betwen the 0.5Gb and 1.8Gb marks can be observed with the test results from the NEC ND-3520A. Also to be noted is a PIE spike of 268 at the 2.2Gb mark. I have also observed similar spikes at the same point on other burns made with the NEC drive and this should present a cause for concern for NEC’s engineers, as should the high and wildly varying jitter levels. Unfortunately in this case, there was a PIF spike of 17 and a POF total of 155 measured in this burn - both negatively impacting on the final “Quality Score”. Even with these issues, the NEC ND-3520A reads the disc back flawlessly, which was a great surprise.


#8

To sum it all up, both drives have great potential for creating excellent burns with both types of RITEKG05 media. BenQ needs to improve their Walking-OPC algorithm and make it as agressive for DVD-R as it is for DVD+R media. NEC’s engineers will need to work on lowering jitter levels and also lowering 8x burn times.

On the other hand, RiTEK need to improve their quality control and manufacturing procedures to improve the overall quality of their media output. It seems that some batches of RiTEK media are better than others, and consistancy between batches is seriously lacking.

The burn quality on RITEKG05 media produced on both the BenQ DW1620 Pro and the NEC ND-3520A at 8x is satisfactory, however, I cannot recommend these discs for long-term archives as there are media types better suited to this task, such as Taiyo Yuden and Mitsubishi/Verbatim, that burn with lower error rates on both of these drives.

Stay tuned for more media tests by TerminalVeloCD!

Regards,
TerminalVeloCD


#9

A suggestion … flash the benq drive so that it can read disks at 16 speed (using meditspeedcodeedit) and run the transfer rate tests on the disks again using the benq drive.

The NEC drive may have an unfair advantage when reading disks it has burnt itself, I want to see if the benq also will have this advantage.


#10

I’ve also found NEC drives to have slight compatibility problems reading Ritek DVD+/-R media.

Don’t ask me why…