TeamViewer responds to ransomware reports – it’s not our fault

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: TeamViewer responds to ransomware reports – it’s not our fault[newsimage]http://www.myce.com/wp-content/images_posts/2016/03/teamviewer-95x75.png[/newsimage]

TeamViewer has responded to the reports that their software is abused to install ransomware on computers. Yesterday we reported that users found ransomware on their computer and found in their logs that it was uploaded through TeamViewer. According to TeamViewer this is not due to a security issue with their software.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/teamviewer-responds-ransomware-reports-not-fault-78962/](http://www.myce.com/news/teamviewer-responds-ransomware-reports-not-fault-78962/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

It thus takes as many as 17 hours for 24 attempts. The latency is only reset after successfully entering the correct password.
Yep, worst case I have seen took 14 days before being able to enter the correct password and so I can verify that this function is working.

“Careless use is at the bottom of the cases we currently looked at”, TeamViewer writes in the statement.
There is nothing that is going to protect you against your own stupidity :stuck_out_tongue:

TeamViewer recommend users to make sure to only use unique and secure passwords, to enabled two-factor authentication and to download the software only through official TeamViewer channels.
Unnecessary comment it seems, but it can not be said often enough. I often wonder why people have such a hard time finding good passwords and do teach people simple techniques like keyboard tracking I have mentioned before. Come to think of it, let me repeat it as it is a good way to create advanced passwords without loosing track :stuck_out_tongue:

Keyboard tracking, simple explanation of the logic:
a password like [B]ChR5VjT6[/B] would seem impossible to remember, but the point is that if you look at your keyboard it follows logic (albeit a little advanced in this case) - Every second character is a capital and the pattern for the four first repeats itself in the second four characters.
Didn’t get it? O.K. let us try another a little easier - Now look at the keyboard: [B]cdr4vft5[/B]
Now that would not be too advanced to remember, now would it? It would however lay off most ‘brute force’ attacks, and if you shift one step left or one step right on your keyboard when forced to change, none would be able to figure out your password unless you tell them.

The thing is that if I chit-chat with you and ask you about your family, something most find cozy, I will probably have enough information to crack 80% of passwords out there and I hate the status as I would like even you to be safe :flower:


#3

I know how TeamViewer has been used to scam folks. I just hung up on a call from 914-205-9811 with the caller id of SOFTWARE PROBLEM. The caller had such a thick accent I was unable to understand him. He put his SUPERVISOR on the line, his accent was thick, but understandable. He stepped me through how to find TEAMVIEWER on my web browser. As soon as I realized what he was doing, I admonished him. Shouldn’t he feel bad working in a call center in India/Pakistan making $3. and hour scamming old ladies and men in America. He didn’t seem the least ashamed, but said “Hey, it’s a living. Where I live, even with an education, you need to do whatever you can to get by”

If I would have continued the conversation, he was prepared to show me how to install TeamViewer so he could take control of my computer. This is what happens when many intelligent folks in third world countries have access to the internet. They set up these “Social Engineering” scams. Even if less than 1% of those who respond to their calls fall for their scam, they can still make a nice living compared to other in their country.


#4

[QUOTE=jayhall3;2770741]He didn’t seem the least ashamed, but said “Hey, it’s a living. Where I live, even with an education, you need to do whatever you can to get by”

If I would have continued the conversation, he was prepared to show me how to install TeamViewer so he could take control of my computer. This is what happens when many intelligent folks in third world countries have access to the internet. They set up these “Social Engineering” scams. Even if less than 1% of those who respond to their calls fall for their scam, they can still make a nice living compared to other in their country.[/QUOTE]

Sure, none makes it out of here alive and so we do what we can to survive the best way that we can. If that includes scamming, so be it.
A free society is one where it is safe to be unpopular and voice opinions not acceptable to others. In our western world we can afford that whereas in other parts of the world we could not.
In the second and third world, the question is quite different though… Do I live tomorrow? The answer equally unflattering… Unless you’re smart, probably not.

In other words, we allow ourselves to become irritated because others try to survive by preying on us (even though, if the tables were turned, we would probably do the same ourselves).
The only thing that is working is to be cautious and not trust people like you noticing the scam before being hit.

With that being said, people are generally too trusting. One such story includes me on the first communication, taking over a computer and cleaning it of malware. I just helped of course, but I was rather shocked as I could have done just about anything without that particular user noticing (based on obvious lack of computer knowledge). Sadly, I think this group is subject to fall prey to such scams.

Finally, since I noticed, welcome to the forum jayhall3 :flower:


#5

Anytime you let someone you do not know take control of your computer you are at risk of being a victim. Its as simple as that. If you do not know the person or the company you are dealing with do not let them use Team Viewer. All real companys have a program like Team Viewer but it logs everything you do.


#6

I’ve read a few articles on Ars Technica about victims (if you can call them that) having a laugh at the expense of the scammers. The Article “Can you fix my Windows 95 computer?”: How to troll a tech support scammer is hilarious. Of course, for every smart person who sees this scam coming, there are plenty of people who don’t, and they have a very high chance to fall right into it.


#7

[QUOTE=TSJnachos117;2770777]I’ve read a few articles on Ars Technica about victims (if you can call them that) having a laugh at the expense of the scammers. The Article “Can you fix my Windows 95 computer?”: How to troll a tech support scammer is hilarious. Of course, for every smart person who sees this scam coming, there are plenty of people who don’t, and they have a very high chance to fall right into it.[/QUOTE]

A good laughs worth. Off topic, but “The Bastard Operator From Hell” series is a fun read too.
I use a few points from it to reason why we should not allow ourselves to be curious when working with IT security and users, but rather let the technology (logs,scripts,code) handle it until something needs to be addressed on a professional level.

It will never stop to surprise me though how people can even think that someone will call you and offer their help ‘out of the blue’ without both the red flag being raised in your mind and the warning whistle blasting off at 120db in your ears. :confused:


#8

[QUOTE=Xercus;2770736]
Unnecessary comment it seems, but it can not be said often enough. I often wonder why people have such a hard time finding good passwords and do teach people simple techniques like keyboard tracking I have mentioned before. Come to think of it, let me repeat it as it is a good way to create advanced passwords without loosing track :stuck_out_tongue:

Keyboard tracking, simple explanation of the logic:
a password like [B]ChR5VjT6[/B] would seem impossible to remember, but the point is that if you look at your keyboard it follows logic (albeit a little advanced in this case) - Every second character is a capital and the pattern for the four first repeats itself in the second four characters.
Didn’t get it? O.K. let us try another a little easier - Now look at the keyboard: [B]cdr4vft5[/B]
Now that would not be too advanced to remember, now would it? It would however lay off most ‘brute force’ attacks, and if you shift one step left or one step right on your keyboard when forced to change, none would be able to figure out your password unless you tell them.[/quote]

This sounds like a more advanced version of the semi-popular pin number 2580. :slight_smile:

(ie. Straight down the middle row on a telephone/atm keypad).

Wonder if anybody has written a program to generate “dictionaries” of semieasy/medium-to-remember patterns on a standard keyboard. (ie. Besides easy keyboard patterns like quertyuiop, asdfghjkl, zxcvbnm, etc …).

[QUOTE=Xercus;2770736]
The thing is that if I chit-chat with you and ask you about your family, something most find cozy, I will probably have enough information to crack 80% of passwords out there and I hate the status as I would like even you to be safe :flower:[/QUOTE]

Definitely.


#9

[QUOTE=jcroy;2770788]This sounds like a more advanced version of the semi-popular pin number 2580. :slight_smile:
(ie. Straight down the middle row on a telephone/atm keypad).

Wonder if anybody has written a program to generate “dictionaries” of semieasy/medium-to-remember patterns on a standard keyboard. (ie. Besides easy keyboard patterns like quertyuiop, asdfghjkl, zxcvbnm, etc …). [/QUOTE]

I try to teach easy patterns to persuade people to avoid the names of their pets, family a.s.o. It will of course benefit you greatly if you take the time to figure out an advanced keyboard track like VfjN0912$& but then it may be hard for some to remember the pattern and in my mind, a little advanced is better than Lisa96 where Lisa is the name of your daughter born in 1996. The reason why we can be reasonably sure it is 96 and not 1996 would be a password requirement of 6 characters :bigsmile:

Actually, some of the more common ones like the ones you mention are present in several brute force dictionaries, but so far I have yet to hear of a program figuring out the most logic keyboard tracks - if someone knows of one, please reply :flower:


#10

[QUOTE=alan1476;2770766]Anytime you let someone you do not know take control of your computer you are at risk of being a victim. Its as simple as that. If you do not know the person or the company you are dealing with do not let them use Team Viewer. All real companys have a program like Team Viewer but it logs everything you do.[/QUOTE]

In the default configuration it does log everything. It can be turned off in options Advanced though as shown



#11

[QUOTE=Xercus;2770846]In the default configuration it does log everything. It can be turned off in options Advanced though as shown[/QUOTE]

Even so Xercus, what are your options? So you have the thief on a log, and you have proof of everything he or she has done to steal your files, then what? Do you actually think you are going to find them? The program that my old company uses is like Team Viewer only each support person has his or her own log number and name and it can be traced to the actual company, which is a world wide company with 25 locations in 10 country’s, and everyone of the 50 States. Using Team Viewer from some unknown entity can only lead to bad things in most instances. jmho.:wink:


#12

[QUOTE=alan1476;2770892]Even so Xercus, what are your options? So you have the thief on a log, and you have proof of everything he or she has done to steal your files, then what? Do you actually think you are going to find them? The program that my old company uses is like Team Viewer only each support person has his or her own log number and name and it can be traced to the actual company, which is a world wide company with 25 locations in 10 country’s, and everyone of the 50 States. Using Team Viewer from some unknown entity can only lead to bad things in most instances. jmho.;)[/QUOTE]

I have the logging on of course, I just thought I should mention that it is not necessarily so that TeamViewer logs the connection.
Finding them? That depends how red-handed I catch them and how careless they are.
A year or so ago, a French citizen was dumb enough to try to hack from his own IP address and I managed to cut him off from internet by reporting his actions which was still going on to his ISP and the Upstream provider, it was not TeamViewer related though.
Usually though, they are smarter than that and so you have to settle at blocking the IP or a range for a while. :slight_smile:


#13

[QUOTE=Xercus;2770901]I have the logging on of course, I just thought I should mention that it is not necessarily so that TeamViewer logs the connection.
Finding them? That depends how red-handed I catch them and how careless they are.
A year or so ago, a French citizen was dumb enough to try to hack from his own IP address and I managed to cut him off from internet by reporting his actions which was still going on to his ISP and the Upstream provider, it was not TeamViewer related though.
Usually though, they are smarter than that and so you have to settle at blocking the IP or a range for a while. :)[/QUOTE]
I think Team Viewer is more for people that you know, not for people you dont know that you have answered an internet ad for help on your PC. Its more for people like you and me, if you need my help or I need yours ,we could go that route, but basically its a nice little tool for support for small company’s that you know are legit. jmho.


#14

Agree :flower: - It is a tool for professionals, made available for free for personal use among friends :clap:

Sadly, that means it is available to the predators as well :doh:, and the victims probably do not even know about TeamViewer or what it is for, fails to read on the page and just execute according to instructions.
With so many victims to different scams worldwide, we can not be looking at just careless users, we must be looking at hordes completely lacking computer knowledge what-so-ever. Not only that, they are obviously overly trusting as well…

Oh well, knowledge breaks through at the necessary cost in time no matter, I guess we just have to make a further dive first :frowning: