SYBA SD-SATA-4P PCI SATA Card Issues

The SYBA SD-SATA-4P PCI SATA Card that I got from http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815124020&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction--na--na-_-na&cm_sp=&AID=10446076&PID=5412144&SID=skim19619X769413X6af3473759511242bc3e3e9f9ba34a3b works after boot to Windows, but the SATA DVD burner connected to it isn’t detected during boot, i.e. unable to boot to disk in SATA optical drive. Note I did have to do a repair install of WinXP before it would boot to the SATA hard drive. Has anybody had this problem or know a fix for issues when trying to boot to SATA optical drives connected to this card?

BEV, I’ve installed a number of Syba and Silverstone SATA-IDE combo controllers before but not the model you are using.

One thing we discovered - our motherboards were much newer than IDE technology, but still needed BIOS updates and, to accomplish that, we had to uninstall the card’s software, then remove the card, boot up and then do a BIOS update. Quite a chore.

Which, of course, we didn’t discover until I crashed that first unit.

I did a clean install (of XP, then Win7 on a 2nd machine which someone helped me trash) and those cards have worked fine. We’re using them for the IDE ports, however (running older, tried-and-true IDE DVD burners) while you’re using this card for the SATA ports.

I’ve had perhaps 40% unpleasant results using WinXP Repairs, and ultimately reverted to a Clean Install eventually - a total wipeout and re-load. I suspect a Repair still sticks in a lot of Now-Old Versions of files that were updated and “fixed” thru WinUpdates, and I’ve blamed that for that ‘40%’ not-so-great results with Repair operations.

One thing I remember doing - reading the Syba card’s “controller chip ID” and googling to find other vendors’ cards that use the same chipset. Silverstone had newer drivers than Syba, which were newer than Bytecc and a handful of others. It may be worthwhile, however, to try Older Drivers since you’re loading this into an Older PC (yes? - I assume so since it’s a PCI card) and then ‘step up’ with any newer driver-versions. IF you can find them, that is.

If you pull that card out and post the largest chip’s numeric IDs here, maybe we can help determine which chipset drivers might be useful.

[QUOTE=bevills1;2685286]The SYBA SD-SATA-4P PCI SATA Card that I got from http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815124020&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction--na--na-_-na&cm_sp=&AID=10446076&PID=5412144&SID=skim19619X769413X6af3473759511242bc3e3e9f9ba34a3b works after boot to Windows, but the SATA DVD burner connected to it isn’t detected during boot, i.e. unable to boot to disk in SATA optical drive. Note I did have to do a repair install of WinXP before it would boot to the SATA hard drive. Has anybody had this problem or know a fix for issues when trying to boot to SATA optical drives connected to this card?[/QUOTE]

I have similiar card but you must check in your BIOS and see if the boot options shows a RAID boot that is where your Optical drive is connected to and how the BIOS identifies the card whether or not you have Raid on or not. Otherwise you need to update your BIOS to get the feature to detect the RAID pci card so you can redirect it to boot from the optical drive. I had that same problem til I looked closer in the boot option in the BIOS and saw my drive name referenced attached to the RAID card. One you point it in the right direction then it will boot from the Optical drive.

This is my card and I still use it for the time being…and is similiar to yours.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16816124008

If what coolcolors says is correct, I may be sol because the board I have isn’t RAID, and I think the latest BIOS is installed. ChristineBCW, I’ve also had some issues with WinXP repair install some of which are included in my reply #3 at http://club.myce.com/f3/sata-burner-problems-win2k-332273/#post2685452 on other issues related to the SYBA card.

The card works fine now once booted to Windows, but there may not be a way to boot to optical drives connected to it. However, I just remembered seeing a post on flashing this SYBA card to IDE mode. Is anybody familiar with this or know if that might make optical drives connected to the card bootable?

What you need to do is to select the proper Silicon Image controller chip from the pull-down menu here. Find and download the BASE BIOS and flashing utility. You may need to boot into pure DOS to flash the BASE BIOS. Afterwards, reboot, and the PC should recognize your card, and indicate “SATALINK” instead of “SATARAID” during post. If you have any drives (hard or optical), their name will completely/partially show up. Then download the BASE driver and go through Device Manager to update it manually.

My hard drives are actually booting/running off a SiL3132 PCIE-to-SATA controller card while my optical drives are all tied to the motherboard with the SATA controller all set to IDE mode in BIOS. I’m running W7Pro now, but had no problems in WXP Pro before.

It’s not the driver software or Windows. It’s either the boot order settings in the motherboard BIOS or the BIOS of the SATA card. I have the very similar 2-drive version of that controller, and I don’t think I it would boot from optical drives until I updated to the Oct. 28, 2008 BIOS. The newest BIOS I see for your 4-drive card is dated 4/22/2008. The Windows-based BIOS updater doesn’t seem to work, and I had to use the DOS version.

Current boot splash screen shows “SATALINK,” 5.3.0.4 BIOS version and shows the SATA hard drive and SATA optical drive below that, but I don’t get “Press any key to boot from CD” during boot when there’s a boot disk in the optical drive. The latest version I see at the KTL link is 5.5.0.0 dated 4/22/2008. Should flashing to that latest BIOS resolve the problem?

That means you have the BASE BIOS already on the SiI card already, but it doesn’t hurt to update to the latest. Like the 3-stooges said, if you want to boot from it, you have to go to your motherboard’s BIOS and see if you can change the priority of the booting/checking sequence. So it would be something like:

[ul]
[li]First boot: Add-on Card
[/li][li]Second boot: CD-ROM
[/li][li]Third boot: Hard Drive
[/li][/ul]

This will check your SiI card first, then DVD/CD drive connected to the motherboard second, and hard drive on the motherboard last.

Latest 5.5.0.0 BIOS was flashed, and drivers were updated to latest version in Windows. There is no Add-0n Card option in motherboard’s BIOS, and the only motherboard’s BIOS boot selections are CDROM, Floppy, LS120, SCSI, HDD0, HDD1, HDD2, HDD3 and some USB device selections. The only 1 of those I think might work is the SCSI selection. The PC will boot to a bootable DVD if SCSI is before HDD0 in the boot order, but it won’t boot to HDD0 when the bootable DVD is removed and just freezes as though it’s looking for the SCSI device. I must reset boot order with HDD0 before SCSI in order to boot to HDD0.

I think my motherboard’s BIOS may be too old to work efficiently with the add-on card, and I’ll just need to change motherboard’s BIOS settings when I need to boot to a DVD. This is a bit of a cumbersome solution, but I can think of no other option.

If you remove the SATA hard drive from the controller card, will it POST for HDD0 if no boot disc is in the optical drive? See if there’s a newer BIOS for your motherboard, may be there are some fixes.

It still posts for HDD0 with SATA hard drive disconnected if no boot disc is in the optical drive. I checked for motherboard BIOS updates and found latest BIOS is installed.

[QUOTE=bevills1;2685852]It still posts for HDD0 with SATA hard drive disconnected if no boot disc is in the optical drive.[/QUOTE]
What I meant is it still posts for HDD0 with SATA hard drive disconnected if no boot disc is in the optical drive as long HDD0 is before SCSI in the BIOS boot order. However, it will not post for HDD0 under any circumstance if SCSI is before HDD0 in the BIOS boot order.

A correction is in order because I erred when I said it would post to HDD0 with SATA hard drive disconnected if what KTL meant was to disconnect the SATA hard drive with SCSI before HDD0 in the BIOS boot order which I haven’t yet tried. It may well post to HDD0 in that circumstance. When I flashed latest SIL 3114 BIOS from DOS boot disk, I forgot to remove the floppy disk when I restarted the PC and got “NTLDR is missing” because it was looking for NTLDR file on the floppy disk. I removed the floppy, and the PC booted normally.

This leads me to believe it will post to HDD0 with SATA hard drive disconnected and SCSI before HDD0 in the BIOS boot order. However, I believe there would still be no better solution to the boot to SATA optical drive on this system if it did post to HDD0 in this circumstance.

Ideally, you would think SATA hard drives and optical drives can exist at the same time on a controller card, but it seems that it’s not possible. So I had suggested to keep the hard drive off the controller card (SCSI) while keeping the optical drive on. If you make the SCSI as primary boot, then the computer should boot to a bootable disc in the “SCSI” optical drive. If no bootable disc is available, then it should search for a boot partition off HDD0 as a secondary boot device.

In another thread on another forum I read where a user had problems seeing 2 IDE optical drives with IDE adapters for a SATA system. He could see 1 IDE optical drive fine with a single drive connected to the adapter but could see neither IDE optical drive when 2 drives were connected. This seems to indicate there may be problems with seeing more than 1 drive for many add-on adapters. That’s too bad because it greatly reduces their usefulness.

Yes, that would make me wonder about the Jumper Settings on the IDE drives vs. the Cable Connector used. I spent most of my IDE life eschewing “Cable Select” because the Drives or the Cables refused to obey, so I’d always use the proper Master-Slave jumpers AND cable connectors. That turned out to be good practice for my marriage, too, although Hubby insists THAT is not his, uh, jumper setting. Well… never mind… probably shouldn’t even mention that.

I have been reading along to witness your travails in hopes you’d have the equipment operating like you want instead of JUST the way it wants.

If you are referring to those adapters that stick to the back of the drives to convert IDE to SATA so they can be used on the motherboard, then yes, it’s likely there are issues due to those adapters. The best way to get around that is to use a PCI-to-IDE controller card. I’ve had a few of those controller cards based on the SiI 0680 chipset and never had problems using them.

[QUOTE=KTL;2686115]If you are referring to those adapters that stick to the back of the drives to convert IDE to SATA so they can be used on the motherboard, then yes, it’s likely there are issues due to those adapters. The best way to get around that is to use a PCI-to-IDE controller card. I’ve had a few of those controller cards based on the SiI 0680 chipset and never had problems using them.[/QUOTE]

Actually I replied to his thread and told him there are issues due to those adapters and the best way to get around that is to use a PCI-to-IDE controller card, but he was trying to get it to work on the cheap and is still struggling with it last I checked.

I was referring to those adapters that stick to the back of the drives to convert IDE to SATA so they can be used on the motherboard, and my PCI SATA adapter appears to be exhibiting different problems in that I’m unable to boot the OS boot drive if SCSI precedes the OS boot drive in BIOS boot order. At least my issues have a simple solution albeit a bit cumbersome.

Cheap doesn’t always work too well. :slight_smile: You spend more time and frustration working it out. I don’t think there’s support any longer for the SiI 0680 chipset since the drop-down option is gone, but there could still be cards out there for cheap that will allow him to run 4 IDE drives.