Swap file move - is it worth it? advice requested

vbimport

#1

I just got a new 500 GB SATA drive for my computer to replace the 160GB IDE. The motherboard supports bother SATA and IDE natively (its a new motherboard, with 1 IDE cable supporting 2 devices and plenty of SATA connectros - right now I have a DVD burner and the hard drive hooked up to the IDE cable).

I was thinking of installing XP on the SATA and moving the swap files and temp files to the IDE, but was wondering if this would help, and there seems to be some confusion on the issue - anyone have any thoughts please?

cons:

SATA and IDE run at different speeds - it might be faster to keep the files on the SATA

pros:

even though SATA is theoretically capable of 3 Gb/s it seems that as a practical matter you can only achieve speeds about the same as an IDE drive - so the speed difference might not matter much

SATA and IDE on the same motherboard should be able to be accessed simultaneously, right (as they’re two different connections)? This should also offset the speed difference…

Finally, would it be better to just get two SATA hard drives (one big, one small) to do this with? How much better (I have 2 old IDE dvd burners on the computer and kind of wanted to upgrade one of them to a new SH-S203B SATA instead)

Thanks for the advice!
Zithras


#2

You’re confusing interface speeds with hard drive speeds, and there’s no correlation. There are no current mainstream hard drives that exceed the speed of a UDMA-5 IDE interface. SATA does have a couple other advantages not related to interface speed.

There’s a small benefit from having a paging file on a separate physical drive, but you also need one on the system drive, so most folks place a file on each physical drive and let Windows sort out which to use at any given time. But if it’s “speed” you’re after, your money is better spend on more and faster RAM and/or a faster hard drive like a WD Raptor.

It’s faster not to need the paging file at all. (get more RAM) If you have 2GB of RAM, you’ll almost never need the paging file. But there are other advantages to having multiple hard drives, as you can use different drives for scratch and temp files for various programs.


#3

I don’t think I’m confusing the two…just had a confusing post…In any case, I think

“There are no current mainstream hard drives that exceed the speed of a UDMA-5 IDE interface.”

was the answer I was looking for. (i.e. there are no hard drives that effectively take advantage of the SATA interface speed-wise over IDE)

And no, I’m not really looking for a 10000 rpm drive, as those get expensive fast.

Although you raise an interesting point - why do you actually need a paging file on the system drive? Is it just one of those stupid requirements imposed by Windows? What happens to the computer if I set the paging file on the system drive to 0 and the file on the second drive to 4 GB (max)? Does XP just fail to recognize a paging file (or swapfile, or whatever theyre calling it now…) at all?

Thanks!
Zithras


#4

No this is what you want to do put it on another drive that is a seperate physical drive from your os


#5

[QUOTE=Zithras;2049257]

Although you raise an interesting point - why do you actually need a paging file on the system drive? Is it just one of those stupid requirements imposed by Windows? What happens to the computer if I set the paging file on the system drive to 0 and the file on the second drive to 4 GB (max)? Does XP just fail to recognize a paging file (or swapfile, or whatever theyre calling it now…) at all?

Thanks!
Zithras[/QUOTE]

Windoz needs a file on the OS drive for system logging and a few other things. 20MB is usually considered adequate, but unless there’s a space issue there’s no reason not to make it bigger. Having large paging files on multiple drives gives Windoz to option of selecting which one to use based on drive activity. It’s supposed to use the one with the least activity. I have files on 3 different drives, but they rarely, if ever, get used apart from minimal system activity.

You have a tool in “Performance Monitor” that allows you to monitor paging file usage by drive and in total, as well as RAM usage.


#6

Thanks!

That’s all my hard drive questions answered!

Zithras