"Super Wi-Fi" devices could launch in early 2011

I just posted the article “Super Wi-Fi” devices could launch in early 2011.

The FCC will be voting next week on whether to allow the utilization of the white space portion of the television broadcast spectrum. Approval of the motion could pave the way for new so-called “super Wi-Fi” devices as soon as early next year.

Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/super-wi-fi-devices-could-launch-in-early-2011-34310/](http://www.myce.com/news/super-wi-fi-devices-could-launch-in-early-2011-34310/)

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Awesome. “Super Cancer” coming as early as 2011. Don’t we have powerful enough radiation waves in the world? I forbid Wi-Fi in my home. Just not safe enough, IMHO, especially since I have a 3 year old.

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/content/view/42052/

Current Wi-Fi uses the 2.4Ghz band, The same as a lot of wireless phones ( not cellular). It could cause problems if they pump too much power out or use larger aftermarket antennas, but other than these parents looking for a scapegoat with absolutely no evidence at all, I have not seen any credible reports of any danger.

Personally I would love to see a seperate band for Wi-Fi, too many devices interfere with WI-Fi, including microwave ovens…

This sounds great for our rural friends. One station could cover a very large area and give all of them access. It would greatly reduce the expense of setting up hundreds of stations all over the place.

You can tweak the range by varying power output. Default to very low power for city use, crank it up for rural use. Even then I see this being used for rural fixed wireless more than anything else. Directional antennas at the client site will minimize the need for tin foil hats. Longer range and less trouble with trees than WiFi.

[QUOTE=DukeNukem;2544369]Awesome. “Super Cancer” coming as early as 2011. Don’t we have powerful enough radiation waves in the world? I forbid Wi-Fi in my home. Just not safe enough, IMHO, especially since I have a 3 year old.[/QUOTE]

If your kid isn’t completely in tin foil and in a faraday cage 24/7 then you will not be able to protect it from any radio wave whatsoever.

But seriously now,

Usually the power of a wifi device is well under a watt. (EU directive).
Old mobile phones had 4 watts and were able to increase the temperature in your brain about 1% when you held it close enough to your head.

A normal FM radio station has well over 20000 watt. (50000 watts maximum in a densely populated zone)

Still serious, there are people who are highly sensitive to radio waves:

If you think your kid is sensitive to radio waves, please try and find a “safe” zone where there is little to no radio waves. Usually somewhere where no other humans live. If it feels a lot better then try and think of creating faraday cages in your house.

[QUOTE=Mr. Belvedere;2544959]If it feels a lot better then try and think of creating faraday cages in your house.[/QUOTE] Do you mean Faraday cages or far-away cages? :stuck_out_tongue:

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2544995]Do you mean Faraday cages or far-away cages? :p[/QUOTE] That entirely depends on how much you love your kids. :slight_smile:

" Old mobile phones had 4 watts and were able to increase the temperature in your brain about 1% when you held it close enough to your head.". Could I please elicit the the background info on this so-called report.
I also have a feeling that fear/anticipation or other such factors may have far more to do with the temp rise then did the actual microwaves.
You see I’m a Vietnam Vet and have worked around com/nav/ecm/crypto equip for a huge amount of my life and I would kinda like to know what the government has been subjecting me to, not that I probably wouldn’t have done it anyway for less pay.
Thank you very much

[QUOTE=Hanto;2545058] Could I please elicit the the background info on this so-called report. [/quote] See here , here and here. In the latest link you will see that GSM power class level 3 on the 1800 band has a maximum of 4 watts.

You see I’m a Vietnam Vet and have worked around com/nav/ecm/crypto equip for a huge amount of my life and I would kinda like to know what the government has been subjecting me to, not that I probably wouldn’t have done it anyway for less pay.
If you have not been standing right in front of one of those dish transmitters, you’re pretty safe :slight_smile:

If you want to know more, you need to know the SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) of the equipment you worked with. A SAR of 4W/kg gives biological tissue effects, but the World Health Organization is still not sure if this has damaging results or just does nothing (or even improve?). One study showed that being exposed for 30 minutes at a 900MHz mobile phone increased the skin temperature a little (about 2.3 ± 0.2 °C after 6 minutes).

Problem also is that there are studies that kinda show that not every cell in the body is evenly affected by radio waves. Some genomes absorb more than others. They seem to think nerve cells are more affected than other cells. Perhaps infants will be more affected in the future, but there is no way to be sure.

I dont’ suspect there will be much demand for this unless you already have a need to extent your wifi signal beyond 1000 feet or have THICK walls to penetrate… Nevertheless don’t expect a device below $200 right away… when they say multi-billion dollar industry they have to add up larger revenue per customer to get that investment back… so expect to be gouged compared with a $20 typical 802.11g router with only 10/100 ports.

[QUOTE=DukeNukem;2544369]Awesome. “Super Cancer” coming as early as 2011. Don’t we have powerful enough radiation waves in the world? I forbid Wi-Fi in my home. Just not safe enough, IMHO, especially since I have a 3 year old.

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n2/content/view/42052/[/QUOTE]
Lol … and here I was thinking that running those 300W PC’s, 2000W audio speaker systems, 350W TV’s, 2400W heaters, 3600W Air conditioning, 800W microwaves, 2400W stoves, not to mention the myriad of lights, alarm clocks, AC/DC adapters, phone chargers, battery chargers, and usual networking gear (including wifi) was sucking more power down the cables, producing low frequency EMF waves of large magnitude on cabling running within the walls, completely surrounding everyones house & roof, were producing orders of magnitudes of what one little 1W radio device is producing. The difference is … tuning/filters :wink:

I dunno about everyone else, but my 16yr old house practically IS a faraday cage :stuck_out_tongue:

I’m sure my house/faraday cage will help when the sun explodes in 2012 (or 2013/2014/2015/Certainly this millenia anyway).

[QUOTE=debro;2545162]I dunno about everyone else, but my 16yr old house practically IS a faraday cage :p[/quote] If there’s reinforced concrete, you practically got one.

I’m sure my house/faraday cage will help when the sun explodes in 2012 (or 2013/2014/2015/Certainly this millenia anyway).
Yes, it’s the same principle that rubber tires help with lightning. It has traveled for hundreds of feet through the air, so those small tires will block its path completely.

A few years back, I recall, Sun Microsystems tried sending software updates through the unused bandwidth available in the vertical blanking period of the standard TV broadcast. It did work but it just never caught on.

And back in the mid 1990’s I used to receive the Teletext service, including real-time stock quotes, using an inexpensive PC ISA-bus drop in card with rabbit-ears antenna, that received the signal transmitted through the same TV vertical blanking period. This was years before the advent of the World Wide Web and the rise of online stock trading. That facility worked well also, until the service was canceled due to lack of subscriber revenue.

So transmitting data in one direction worked well before. But two-way communication via TV? I am not so sure about that. But it is certainly worth giving it a try.

I have a friend who lives on the outskirts of Silicon Valley near San Jose, California. And even to this day he can’t get broadband service at a reasonable price from any vendor. No cell phone digital service, no cable broadband, no DSL. That is really amazing to me, when considering that Silicon Valley is considered to be the “center of the technology vortex”.