Successor to Microsoft phone scam pops up in the United Kingdom

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: Successor to Microsoft phone scam pops up in the United Kingdom[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/11/IRS-phone-scam-prevent-fraud-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

The phone scam where criminals call people at home telling them is a computer problem has a new variant. Previously the scammers pretended to be from Microsoft, in the new variant they pretend to be a support employee from the internet provider.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/successor-to-microsoft-phone-scam-pops-up-in-the-united-kingdom-77778/](http://www.myce.com/news/successor-to-microsoft-phone-scam-pops-up-in-the-united-kingdom-77778/)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

[QUOTE=DoMiN8ToR;2763265]We’ve just posted the following news: Successor to Microsoft phone scam pops up in the United Kingdom[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2015/11/IRS-phone-scam-prevent-fraud-95x75.jpg[/newsimage]

            Read the full article here: http://www.myce.com/news/successor-to-microsoft-phone-scam-pops-up-in-the-united-kingdom-77778/

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.[/QUOTE]

Gosh, these never want to die out… lmao… Anyone believing MS would call you matches this line “A Sucker is Born Every Minute”.


#3

I somehow can not help but wonder how long it will take before Jane and John Doe becomes at least a little sceptical. The interest rate on trust is too low on both the net and phone.

When the Microsoft scam first started, I was unaware of it when a neighbor mentioned to me that Microsoft had called her :confused: and was going to call her again in the afternoon as she had to go.
I know how hard it can be to actually get in touch with Microsoft even for companies and so I immediately said that she should not talk to him when he did call her as she most probably was being fooled.
Instead she should tell him that she knew a senior consultant, give him my number and ask that he called me up (Not knowing for sure, I actually got interested).

I never got any phonecall, but talking to my neighbor three days later, I got to hear that she had done as I said and after giving him my number he just hung up :stuck_out_tongue:

This time it is the ISP that calls, but take it from me, if you spread malware through mail or otherwise, it is you that will call support because you do not have internet access and you are lucky if you have a mail about it in your inbox if the ISP got it from the upstream provider.
Another thing… A refund is always initiated [B]after[/B] you complaint if at all, come on! :confused:

The bottom two true lines:
If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is.
Common sense, cautiousness and sceptisism - your best tools…


#4

Who will still fall for these scams now? With so many media and organization posted warnings and news on the internet, people should have been aware of these scams. In addition, I even can find reports filed by people about these computer related scams at http://whycall.me and another similar sites. We should always read them and spread the word to everyone we know.


#5

[QUOTE=dawning;2763303]Who will still fall for these scams now? With so many media and organization posted warnings and news on the internet, people should have been aware of these scams. In addition, I even can find reports filed by people about these computer related scams at http://whycall.me and another similar sites. We should always read them and spread the word to everyone we know.[/QUOTE]

In my experience, the question should be “How many will still fall for these scams”. There is “a world” of uneducated net users surfing in good faith out there, even installing known malware by themselves - Opening unknown e-mail attachements without any hesitation what-so-ever and so on…
In that context, it should come as no surprise that they fail in being pro-active, let alone seek information about known scams. :rolleyes:

By the way, welcome to the forum :flower:


#6

[QUOTE=Xercus;2763307]In my experience, the question should be “How many will still fall for these scams”. There is “a world” of uneducated net users surfing in good faith out there, even installing known malware by themselves - Opening unknown e-mail attachements without any hesitation what-so-ever and so on…
In that context, it should come as no surprise that they fail in being pro-active, let alone seek information about known scams. :rolleyes:

By the way, welcome to the forum :flower:[/QUOTE]Called Sheeps to the Slaughter… :stuck_out_tongue:


#7

If a complete stranger calls me and asks me to install software and give him/her my bank information why shouldn’t I trust them? After all, it’s not like the world is full of scammers.

PS: sarcasm is fun!