Subtitles are the wrong colour

vbimport

#1

Ok, basicly I have been working on adding subtitles to DVDs,
What I have done is (the DVD is PAL btw)

  1. Ripped the DVD to 4.3GB with DVDShrink (re-author mode, just 1 video and 1 audio stream)
  2. Used VodEdit to “Demux” the audio/video (ended up with a .m2v and .ac3)
  3. Got the .srt subtitles
  4. Converted the .srt to .sup with SRT2SUP
  5. Used IfoEdit to author the DVD

Ok, basicly the DVD wont start normally with Nero ShowTime, but if I re-author it with DVD Shrink again it starts fine, and everything is fine, exept the subtitles, they are in sync, and otherwise ok, exept the colours are all messed up, sometimes I get just a big green block, sometimes the text is green and see through (however the font and position is right), I have tried a few settings on SRT2SUP, but it doesnt make any difference, I am stuck!

Any ideas would be great.

Ben :slight_smile:


#2

You need to open the original IFO file for the main movie using IfoEdit. Click on “VTS_PGCITI” in the top window and select the PGC for the main movie. Then click on “Subtitle Color” on the menu at the top and select “Copy Colors from this PGC”.
Then open the IFO file for your re-encoded movie. Again select the main movie PGC in VTS_PGCITI and click “Subtitle Color” again. Then select “Paste Colors into this PGC”.
Then click “Save” ensuring you have the re-encoded movie IFO selected. This copies the subtitle colour table from the original IFO file and pastes it into your re-encoded movie.

Hope this helps.

Regards

TZ


#3

Thanks!
Worked great :bow:

The other problem was that you cant have the background transparent if the colour is the same as anything else, so I had to select a totaly different colour.

Also, what font and font size is used for most retail DVDs?

Ben :slight_smile:


#4

You could use outlined text for the subtitles. For that you will need an authoring package that has subtitle importing and editing functionality. Since subtitles are bitmaps, the size and font is arbitrary. The text size has to be big enough to cater for small screen sizes so is usually fairly large. Font-wise, many authors use a sans-serif style font to avoid interlacing jitter when displayed on a television.

TZ