Studios aim to do away with VHS format by the end of 2006

I just posted the article Studios aim to do away with VHS format by the end of 2006.

 Since the 

VHS tapes hit the market about 28 years ago, VHS has played a major role for movie purchases and rentals and the majority of consumers still use them for making recordings…

Read the full article here:  [http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/11022-Studios-aim-to-do-away-with-VHS-format-by-the-end-of-2006.html](http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/11022-Studios-aim-to-do-away-with-VHS-format-by-the-end-of-2006.html)

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Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

Well I better stock up an blanks. I refuse to use tvio and dvd to record to, to many restrictions. If I want a dvd just make one on my computer. I hate the fact the"Industry" makes the rules.

In South Korea, most rental stores have thousands of movies on VHS tapes, but only 50 or 100 or a few hundred DVD titles. For them, VHS tapes are virtually free and they get steady income from VHS movie rental. Only extreme few consumers consider switching to DVD. So in some countries and especially in most of the regions in the world, transition from VHS to DVD is slow. Perhaps many of them are going to jump from VHS to HD-DVD directly. There are many people who have and watch HDTV but never had DVD. I personally never had VHS before I first got my own DVD burners and players. Though I got a DVD/VHS combo later, it was only because the DVD player had VHS as well. Some people never had VHS/DVD. They’ll upgrade from analog audio cassette tapes and conventional analog (14-20 inch) TV to HDTV/HD-DVD.

well - vhs is not exactly protectionless – there is macrovision on some tapes that screw up copying … and then again they degrade on their own accord as well so … i think i’ll be tossing my blanks in a matter of years - and in several more even the recorded stuff

The degradation of VHS quality over years convienced me to convert all of my VHS tapes to DVD format last year. My local Blockbuster has very few VHS remaining on the shelves, and all new releases they get are in DVD format only.

[I]Pretty much all other media such as 5.25 floppy disks, [B]backup tapes[/B], 8-track, etc. has been obsolete for many years now. [/I] woaaah wait a second, backup tape is the only way to go if you’ve got a large chunk of data. Not any optical discs on the market that do 100GB storage yet.
[edited by rudiedude on 21.10.2005 20:46]

“woaaah wait a second, backup tape is the only way to go if you’ve got a large chunk of data. Not any optical discs on the market that do 100GB storage yet.” Beg to differ. With RAID and mirroring, coupled with the low cost of hard drives, hard drives make much more sense as a backup medium than tape.

Tape?? Blech… I’m with Controller on this one – go with a removable/external hard drive. For rotating, daily backups tape is “bearable” but thats about it. Based on years of experience with tapes I can say the following (as an IT support rep): 1) Tape has a much higher percentage chance of having an error when you try to recover it. 2) NEVER count on tape for use as a long term backup medium – much like VHS tape, tape backups have a nasty tendency to degrade sitting on the shelf. Anything over 6 months old I’ve dealt with has often had errors show up. 3) The newest tapes are a lot faster than the old units but they are still obnoxiously slow compared to external hard drives – and for random access to your data they are nearly worthless. 4) Compatibility between different model tape drives and drives by different model manufacturers is nearly non-existant. Case in point – an office I work for had a nearby lightning strike generate an EM surge that damaged their server (came in down the internal network line) – and it took out the tape drive. The tapes were all fine so we had the data – more or less. Unfortunately, they no longer made that model tape drive anymore and the new models wouldn’t read their tapes. All I can say is, thank the Lord for Ebay!

My mistake on the backup tapes. I meant the ones they used in the 80’s and early 90’s, since backup tapes are changing all the time.

Hard drives still can’t keep their own against the powerful magnet!

Was that meant to be serous?

What a shame We as consumers should have the choice what we want to buy and what we want to use to record stuff with. I like VHS cant be dealing with all this crap about playback issues stick to VHS and you can’t go wrong.