Storing dvds

vbimport

#1

This will probably sound like a dumb question:
Is it better to store dvds (for a long time) vertically or horizontally? Or will it make any difference over the years?
I just bought a dvd burner and i don’t trust dvd too much yet as a reliable media…
I’ve been working for four years as a computer parts salesman and you wouldn’t believe the horror stories i’ve seen (and been told) about bad CDs. For example, a costumer bought cheap CDs and came back a year later because the reflective layer on the top of almost every CD just peeled off…

I don’t want to sound too paranoid :wink: but i know good CDs can be trusted. I’ve been told that DVDs are a much more fragile, so i want to make sure i don’t loose any data…

Thanks!


#2

Hey and welcome to CDFs!

I think dont think it matters. As long as you store them in a case, out of direct sun light, and in low humidity they sould be fine for a good 10-30 years! Also using high quality media (Sony, TDK ect) can help.

\\VH////
:slight_smile:


#3

I’ve been told that DVDs are a much more fragile, so i want to make sure i don’t loose any data…
Cheap and nasty Disc’s are fragile. As Virus stated If you spend the cash you get the goods: Taiyo Yuden, TDK, and Verbatim so long as their genuine will give you no grief. It is recommended to store them vertically in low humidity and out of constant sunlight. (eg not next to a window) My oldest DVD-R is nearly 3 years (TDK-TTGO2) and plays perfectly. As far as reflective layers peeling off, it is much less likely with a DVD if not impossible. Check out the pic posted by Hastey: DVD’s reflective and dye layer are the centre of a sandwich.



#4

Thanks!
I followed your link on media id guide and found that the DVDs i bought are TDK TTG02. So i guess they’re ok.

Vincent


#5

Do you have any idea why they are suposed to be stored vertically? I was kind of wondering if that was a caryover from vhs. If you store them on thier side it curls the edge of the tape and damages it. I used to have a vcr that could put index marks where it would automatically fast foward to any pre marked point. The indexes were recorded on the edge of the tape and you would loose the indexes in no time if you stored them on thier side.


#6

Yo-

I have been storing CD’s and DVD’s in paper sleeves - horizontally for years without loss of any data - most important - buy good media (Ritek, Taiyo Yuden, Verbatim or Maxell) and store in reasonable temperature area - away from sunlight - and you will be good to go for years-

Mike


#7

The reason given, (cant find the link, but I’m looking) is due to the fact that moisture (via humidity) settles more easily on a horizontal surface, but lets just say thats splitting hairs.

I have been storing CD’s and DVD’s in paper sleeves - horizontally for years without loss of any data
Given that paper is a great insulator and has great absorption properties, this would solve the problem.


#8

I guess that makes sence. I wouldn’t think that polycarbonite would be too suseptable to moisture but I guess that there are probably issues like mold (if it can attack a camera lens, I’m sure it could effect the readability of a disk).


#9

Maybe it’s just that when horizontal, the edges of the disc tend to bend down. Over a couple of days or weeks, it won’t make a difference but over a couple of years, the disc is going to be bent…

Try keeping your arms away from your body in a horizontal position; you shouldn’t be able to hold for more than a couple of minutes. Then try keeping your arms in a vertical position; that should be much easier :wink:


#10

Also water and moisture are more damaging then we think. I used to be an auto glazier and glass cutter and spent some time at a auto glass manufacturing plant. The thing with water/moisture is it can contain: Magnesium, Calcium, Sodium, and Fluoride, plus many other more toxic extras it picks up along the way. Because of this it can stain glass and plastics. This is a real problem if transparency is a must.