Sticky paper labels on DVD+/-R discs: beware!

vbimport

#143

Although I have bad experience with some labeled CDs I have also some (TY) which are even after 10 years still in pretty good shape (but I used also another label manufacturer).
So I conclude that perhaps the combination of CD and label is causing the high error rate. And in mind that already a bad combination of disc and burner can cause a disc becoming a coaster - to add another risky factor (label) is something we should in generally avoid.


#144

Try removing the labels oldtechie. I know it sounds strange, but I’ve read in these forums, on a couple of occasions, where someone removed the label and was able to recover the data.


#145

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2679726]Try removing the labels oldtechie.[/QUOTE] Removing labels from a DVD isn’t particularly risky, but removing labels from a CD can very easily damage the top reflective layer, so be very very careful if you attempt this.

The difference being that in a DVD the reflective layer is in the middle of the disc, while a CD has the reflective layer on top of the disc (usually with a thin lacquer on top but not always).


#146

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2679726]Try removing the labels oldtechie. I know it sounds strange, but I’ve read in these forums, on a couple of occasions, where someone removed the label and was able to recover the data.[/QUOTE]

I tried to pull the label off one of the CDs. It delaminated. Looked really strange. The plastic from the bottom was pretty bare and all of the burned materials were left on the label. :sad:

I have lost so much of my hearing that I can’t enjoy the music anyway. I just want to be sure that I don’t back up user’s data (from computers that I repair) onto bogus optical media etc. And I won’t use labels. I’m just no longer trusting them.

The burner that I used on those music CDs was a Plextor. Not sure of the model, but it cost me big $$ in year 2000. It would burn anything I would throw at it. (only CDs, not DVDs) And I was running Windows 98. My Internet was dial-up. My system was so slow that I would shut off the antivirus (Norton) just to burn a CD. :rolleyes:

That said, I did not know about any kind of tests, such as Nero DiskSpeed. So none of those CDs were ever tested after I burned them.

Also, I was using EasyCD Creator. I don’t remember it doing any kind compare after a burn, like Nero and most other software does now.

Seems like the more we learn, the more complicated it all gets. :Z


#147

[QUOTE=DrageMester;2679729]Removing labels from a DVD isn’t particularly risky, but removing labels from a CD can very easily damage the top reflective layer, so be very very careful if you attempt this.

The difference being that in a DVD the reflective layer is in the middle of the disc, while a CD has the reflective layer on top of the disc (usually with a thin lacquer on top but not always).[/QUOTE]

You got that one right, Drage. See post 144. I have learned something. Until just lately I did not realize the difference between a CD and a DVD concerning where the data is actually written.


#148

Well, you don’t just pull it off, and if the disc is unreadable at the time there is little to lose anyway.

Get a hot, moist towel to try and loosen the glue.


#149

I’ve been using Paper Labels on both CD-R and DVD-Rs and have had no issues in 10 years (using Memorex Labels purchased at Best Buy - a little on the expensive side but I’ve never had any issues whatsoever).

CDR/DVDR used in the past mainly include Fuji, Optimum, TDK, Sony, OD Brand, Best Buy Brand (Dynex), NexxTech (Circuit City Brand), and more recently, the Americopy Brand (purchased from E-Bay).


#150

[QUOTE=Kerry56;2679747]Well, you don’t just pull it off, and if the disc is unreadable at the time there is little to lose anyway.

Get a hot, moist towel to try and loosen the glue.[/QUOTE]

I’ll have to try that. Thanks Kerry56. :stuck_out_tongue:


#151

[QUOTE=DeadSurvivor;2680402]I’ve been using Paper Labels on both CD-R and DVD-Rs and have had no issues in 10 years (using Memorex Labels purchased at Best Buy - a little on the expensive side but I’ve never had any issues whatsoever).

CDR/DVDR used in the past mainly include Fuji, Optimum, TDK, Sony, OD Brand, Best Buy Brand (Dynex), NexxTech (Circuit City Brand), and more recently, the Americopy Brand (purchased from E-Bay).[/QUOTE]

Maybe it was a combo of low quality CDs and the labels just added insult to injury. I think I tried scanning a few and they wouldn’t even scan. I’ll try again. Thanks.


#152

never new this was an issue. Great info.


#153

Can anyone recommend a good direct to disk printing printer??


#154

In North America, we use Epsons. In Europe, there are a series of Canons that have identical mechanics, just different covering-shapes.

The newest direct-on-disk Epson models (the only ones for sale in retails) are the Epson Impression [B]PREMIUM 600s and 800s[/B].

(There is a terribly confusing line of Epson Impression[B] HOME 200-300-400[/B] - these do not offer direct-on-disk printing.)

These Impression Premiums use a hand-fed tray for disk printing. This has been a standard for Epson’s disk-printers for a decade with the wonderful interruption of the recently-deceased Epson Artisan line, which used an internally-fed tray instead. Those are sold as Refurbished Units from Epson’s Clearance for $90-110, and seem to have a great lifespan.

These newer Impression Premium 600s have a savings on ink, by the way.

The difference between Artisan 700s and 800s is a top-loaded auto-scanner (800 series) or merely a flat-bed (700-series).

This is the same difference between these newer Impression Premium 600s (a flat-bed scanner) versus the more expensive 800 series’ auto-feed scanner.

If you consider the Refurb Artisan 700s, those come and go from the Epson Store’s availability. Sometimes I see them for $99, sometimes for $109. They’re easily worth that.

The Epson Impression Premium 600s occasionally hit $99 retail sales prices, too - it looks like every 2-3 months I’ll see that price, otherwise they’re $149.

I tend to buy TWO similar printers based on the ink-cartridges, by the way. One printer WILL die and I’ll eventually have a handful of its cartridges laying around. By getting two units, then I’ve delayed the “Now I’ve got useless cartridges still left!” effect for another couple of years.

All of the Artisans use the same inks.

The Impressions all use their own ‘same cartridges’ too - Home and Premium. Plus Epson’s original direct-on-disk printers (the R-200s and R-300s) still have ink cartridges available so cartridge availability seems assured.


#155

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2686722]In North America, we use Epsons. In Europe, there are a series of Canons that have identical mechanics, just different covering-shapes.

The newest direct-on-disk Epson models (the only ones for sale in retails) are the Epson Impression [B]PREMIUM 600s and 800s[/B].

(There is a terribly confusing line of Epson Impression[B] HOME 200-300-400[/B] - these do not offer direct-on-disk printing.)

These Impression Premiums use a hand-fed tray for disk printing. This has been a standard for Epson’s disk-printers for a decade with the wonderful interruption of the recently-deceased Epson Artisan line, which used an internally-fed tray instead. Those are sold as Refurbished Units from Epson’s Clearance for $90-110, and seem to have a great lifespan.

These newer Impression Premium 600s have a savings on ink, by the way.

The difference between Artisan 700s and 800s is a top-loaded auto-scanner (800 series) or merely a flat-bed (700-series).

This is the same difference between these newer Impression Premium 600s (a flat-bed scanner) versus the more expensive 800 series’ auto-feed scanner.

If you consider the Refurb Artisan 700s, those come and go from the Epson Store’s availability. Sometimes I see them for $99, sometimes for $109. They’re easily worth that.

The Epson Impression Premium 600s occasionally hit $99 retail sales prices, too - it looks like every 2-3 months I’ll see that price, otherwise they’re $149.

I tend to buy TWO similar printers based on the ink-cartridges, by the way. One printer WILL die and I’ll eventually have a handful of its cartridges laying around. By getting two units, then I’ve delayed the “Now I’ve got useless cartridges still left!” effect for another couple of years.

All of the Artisans use the same inks.

The Impressions all use their own ‘same cartridges’ too - Home and Premium. Plus Epson’s original direct-on-disk printers (the R-200s and R-300s) still have ink cartridges available so cartridge availability seems assured.[/QUOTE]

Thank you very much for the detailed answer. Greatly appreciated. I think I will try to find a Refurb Artisan . I already have 2 relatively new printers and this will be no. 3 printer so I am looking for something small that will do direct to disk printing. I prefer not an all in one printer because these tend to be large and I have to fit it into a cabinet.


#156

Blu, follow this link over to the DISK PRINTING subforum. This is my original review of the Epson Impression Premium 600.

That subforum is probably a better discussion place for disk-printers.


#157

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2686736]Blu, follow this link over to the DISK PRINTING subforum. This is my original review of the Epson Impression Premium 600.

That subforum is probably a better discussion place for disk-printers.[/QUOTE]

thanks again ChristineBCW. Unfortunately, I do have some other criteria that I have to meet. I have to fit it in a cabinet so size is important. I already have 2 other printers and one of them is an all in one which tend to be bigger. Maybe an older Epson printer will be smaller that will do Direct to disk printing??


#158

The smallest Epson printer that did Direct On Disk was the original R-200/300 series. These were breadbox sized units, but they’re 10 years old and I’d be cautious about buying used ones because those units ‘died’ by having slicked rollers, which was a $75+ service repair.

If I could find 3 or 4 of those R-200s for under $100 total, I might take that batch and HOPE I could pull a Frankenstein and assemble one or two good units.

I don’t know of any of these that had their print-engines die. We had several hundred of those out in the field, and many customers still use those wonderfully. (And no, I couldn’t buy them off of them - I’ve tried! They too blame size issues!)

The Impression 600 has the smallest recent footprint but indeed you’d want that 17x14 inch space.


#159

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2686740]The smallest Epson printer that did Direct On Disk was the original R-200/300 series. These were breadbox sized units, but they’re 10 years old and I’d be cautious about buying used ones because those units ‘died’ by having slicked rollers, which was a $75+ service repair.

If I could find 3 or 4 of those R-200s for under $100 total, I might take that batch and HOPE I could pull a Frankenstein and assemble one or two good units.

I don’t know of any of these that had their print-engines die. We had several hundred of those out in the field, and many customers still use those wonderfully. (And no, I couldn’t buy them off of them - I’ve tried! They too blame size issues!)

The Impression 600 has the smallest recent footprint but indeed you’d want that 17x14 inch space.[/QUOTE]

Thanks ChristineBCW for sharing your knowledge on this topic. I will look at the Impression 600 and se if it fits in the cabinet or I can replace the oldest printer. Will have to work it that way.
One of the things I am worried about is that I already have a wireless printer. I do not know if I do get the Epson Impression 600 can I run 2 wireless printers in the same house?? If not I would imagine I can just wire it to my house network??


#160

No need to worry about wireless ‘confusion’. Each device has a separate IP address, so “same wireless frequency” isn’t a confusion at all.

I often prefer all-in-one’s to be cabled because the Scan Function is often stalled a bit longer than I want to wait, or sometimes print-jobs are.

These Epsons are good scanners and page-printers, and will handle envelopes as well.


#161

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2686753]No need to worry about wireless ‘confusion’. Each device has a separate IP address, so “same wireless frequency” isn’t a confusion at all.

I often prefer all-in-one’s to be cabled because the Scan Function is often stalled a bit longer than I want to wait, or sometimes print-jobs are.

These Epsons are good scanners and page-printers, and will handle envelopes as well.[/QUOTE]

Thanks ChristineBCW. That is what I needed to know. I’m now looking around to find a good deal. Appreciate your help.


#162

[QUOTE=ChristineBCW;2686722]In North America, we use Epsons. In Europe, there are a series of Canons that have identical mechanics, just different covering-shapes[/QUOTE]

Wow - never thought that it would be that difficult for customers.
Any idea what is the name of the Canon series you refer to?