Standalone DVD player compatibility

  1. What is the best (more importantly, most compatible) Filetype/container (audio aswell) to be played on a Standalone DVD player?

  2. Assuming this file is under 700 MB (or whatever the size of the media is), could this fil;e be burned to a CD-R and played in a Standalone DVD with the same results? (Do all Standalone’s support this?)

  1. A DVD-Video. Any other file, probably XviD in .avi container.
  2. Possibly. You’ll have to check the specifications: whether it will play MPEG4 encodings such as XviD (.avi), DivX (.avi or .divx), .wmv, or .mp4 containers; then whether it will recognise physical media such as DVD or CD.
  1. The only supported type for ALL players is the DVD-Video spec. Any other type will vary from player to player.

  2. Size doesn’t necessarily matter. Size will only matter if you are keeping the files as avi files, for example. Then your may concern will be if your DVD player(s) have Divx (avi) support. Even then, it is more cost efficient to burn several files to DVD. Most players do NOT support Divx playback. In which case see answer #1.

I appreciate both answers, but it inspires a new question:

Is it possible to convert an avi/divx file to DVD Video Spec format? (Please correct me if I’m wrong; from your answer I assume that DVD Spec format are the .VOB, IFO, and .BUP files that are usually burned on DVD’s).

Would I be sacrificing any quality when I convert from .avi/divx to DVD Video Spec? (Apart from the quality that was initially lost when the movie was converted TO .avi/divx).

What would be your suggestions for a program that does this? (Preferably free).

Please don’t tell me to just google it, I’m well aware of what a search engine is, but I’d rather not load up my computer with spyware infested poorly coded sharewares without taking into consideration advice given by real people.

Thanks for your responses so far,
nNJ

DVD Flick

Any conversion is going to incur some loss of quality in the output. If it is done well, you may not notice it at all.

DVDFlick, as mentioned by MysticEyes, is one free option. FAVC and AVStoDVD are two more. If you want to look for more options, conduct a search at videohelp.com.