SSD sector offset, partition

I’ve got a OCZ Vertex-4 64GB SSD, I’m using Win XP Pro OS (but at this stage it’s still on a HDD, I’m formatting the SSD on a spare plug), I wish to align it using ‘Diskpar’,I wonder if someone could tell me the ‘sector offset’ for this, is it 1024 for all sizes? also could someone tell me what alignment is as I’ve no idea about SSDs. I read ‘What is SSD/SSD FAQ’ & that helps but I still want to know about - they say to align the partition but I’m not partitioning it or do they mean that if you use the whole space, it’s still called a partition? Thanks.

Hi
Yes 1024 offset for all sizes of SSD, when you partition the drive with Diskpar, the whole partition is aligned. Once this competes, just QUICK format the SSD with the 4096 option (NTFS) and it’s ready to go.

NAND is arranged in pages, so you need to align to make sure the SSD writes at the start of a page rather than the middle of a page. This improves performance and endurance of the NAND, and yes it’s still called a partition and is treated just like a normal HDD partition by the operating system and applications.

Aligning the partition is also automatic if you use the native formatter in
Windows Vista or Windows 7

AND for all those that believe the anti-cloning propaganda
that is floating around on the web, Clonezilla correctly aligns
partitions by default. so you CAN “clone” an OS to an SSD
and not “screw up” the alignment and subsequently need to “align”

Aligning the SSD partition is something that only NEEDS to be
specifically worried about with Obsolescent Operating systems (XP)

To Check and see if your partitions are aligned correctly it do the following:
1)Open your start menu and type in msinfo32.
2)Open Msinfo32 and go to Components > Storage > Disks.
3)Look for your SSD on the list and find the “Partition Starting Offset” item.
If this number is divisible by 4096 (when by 4096 the number should equal
a whole number and not a decimal) if so, then your partition is correctly aligned.
If not, you need to realign it. (THAT is another discussion)

In my specific case that number is 1048576 and when divided by 4096 = 256

So I KNOW my partition is “aligned”, and yes, I CLONED my OS to this SSD
(take that all you anti-cloning myth believers and myth propagators!)

As a note I usually prefer to format a hard drive with the operating system disc
that will be used to install the OS to the SSD/HDD.

But there is materially no difference in using any convenient Vista or Win7 machine
to do the job

Clonezilla does not “see” unformatted drives so I actually used my Win7 notebook
and a USB cable to “quick format” my New SSD.

The method is FAR less important than the results.

If the journey was more important than getting to the destination we’d have never
bothered to tame horses, invent the railroad, the car, the airplane, etc…

[QUOTE=AllanDeGroot;2656575]
1)Open your start menu and type in msinfo32.
2)Open Msinfo32 and go to Components > Storage > Disks.
3)Look for your SSD on the list and find the “Partition Starting Offset” item.
[/QUOTE]This opens the application DISKPART or in XP DISKPAR. The same applies when you create or format a partition. The GUI just passes parameters to DISKPAR/DISKPART.

On XP you have to set the partition offset manually, as described in the SSD FAQ.

Cloning will only align properly if the partition is already aligned when creating the partition. The SSD or HDD must have a partition before you can format it. Therefore, if you created the partition on Vista/Win7/Win8 then the partition is already aligned by default.

[QUOTE=Dee;2656583]This opens the application DISKPART or in XP DISKPAR. The same applies when you create or format a partition. The GUI just passes parameters to DISKPAR/DISKPART.

On XP you have to set the partition offset manually, as described in the SSD FAQ.

Cloning will only align properly if the partition is already aligned when creating the partition. The SSD or HDD must have a partition before you can format it. Therefore, if you created the partition on Vista/Win7/Win8 then the partition is already aligned by default.[/QUOTE]

Correct and correct.

My point was that people constantly mention partition alignment, but
with partitions created with Vista or Windows7 it simply [I]cannot be[/I]
“wrong” presuming the original partition on the disc was created with these OS’s

The list of things that have to be done to migrate an existing installation or a fresh install to an SSD can be greatly reduced if the person reading the list isn’t trying to install XP on their new SSD.

the root problem is that few read the FAQ and fewer still understand it (as well written as it is)

And there are a few caveats that you should have to tell you to
skip parts of it if your situation meets certain conditions.

I personally KNEW my partition was correctly “Aligned” I only actually looked today to give actual, real-world examples for my previous comment