SSD pricing likely to become stable - no more price drops expected

vbimport

#1

SSD pricing likely to become stable - no more price drops expected.

[newsimage]http://static.rankone.nl/images_posts/2012/10/Fz7QxL.png[/newsimage]Prices of NAND flash memory are increase, what does that mean for SSD drives? Click to read more!


Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/ssd-drive-pricing-likely-to-become-stable-no-more-price-drops-expected-64154/](http://www.myce.com/news/ssd-drive-pricing-likely-to-become-stable-no-more-price-drops-expected-64154/)


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#2

The price of NAND governs the price of SSD but I do not think the market could stand a price increase at this time


#3

The price of NAND is only a small part of the cost of an SSD. Fairly large fluctuations will only mean a few dollars on the cost of a drive.


#4

I feel the price of SSDs needs to drop, or the capacity need to increase to be on par with disc hard drives. I’m sure it must be cheaper to build an SSD than a standard HDD. Perhaps I’m wrong. I wont buy any SSDs for storage even if they are vastly faster.
I guess we shall see what happens in the future of computing, things are changing, perhaps we will be forced to use the cloud for storage, who knows? That’s not the way I want it to go.


#5

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2658190]I feel the price of SSDs needs to drop, or the capacity need to increase to be on par with disc hard drives.[/QUOTE]

I’m with you, Voxsmart. Until SSD’s are up to par with HD’s prices and capacities, I wouldn’t consider buying one. But when that does happen (and I’m sure it will someday), I’ll probably be overjoyed to buy one.


#6

system drives only need to be btw 1 - 2 TB… when these prices drop sufficiently, the mass market can finally adopt them. however they are a long ways off… this capacity could easily run $1-$2k vs $100 - $200.

In contrast… USB flash will continue it’s decline… there re more mfg. companies vying for the same business. Some overlap could push SSD chip makers to rethink their strategy…


#7

I actually use a 256 Samsung SSD as a boot drive, but use a few TB of disk drives for storage. Boot drives are all SSDs are good for at the moment That’s probably stating the obvious! The speed boost versus the cost was just about worth it at £140
A 2TB or more SSD at an equivalent price of a disc HDD would be great, I wonder when it will happen?


#8

[QUOTE=voxsmart;2658397]I actually use a 256 Samsung SSD as a boot drive, but use a few TB of disk drives for storage. Boot drives are all SSDs are good for at the moment That’s probably stating the obvious! The speed boost versus the cost was just about worth it at £140
A 2TB or more SSD at an equivalent price of a disc HDD would be great, I wonder when it will happen?[/QUOTE]
If it happened now the price would be prohibitive. You could proabably buy a nice used car for what a 2 TB SSD would cost.


#9

As usb flash drives using usb 3.0 goes from $1 to .50 cents to .25 cents/gb , SSD will be cut at the knees as these drives could be raid/array’d to achieve ssd capacities of 1-2tb…


#10

$17,500 for a 3.2GB OCZ PCIe SSD

http://www.costcentral.com/proddetail/OCZ_Technology_OCZ_Z_Drive_R4_C_Series_PCI_Express_SSD_CM88/ZD4CM88FH32T/11442096/pricegrabber/


#11

[QUOTE=tmc8080;2658492]As usb flash drives using usb 3.0 goes from $1 to .50 cents to .25 cents/gb , SSD will be cut at the knees as these drives could be raid/array’d to achieve ssd capacities of 1-2tb…[/QUOTE]

There are adapters which enable some memory cards to interface to a computer, allowing use as an SSD, but they are not intended to be the primary storage device in the computer. The typical CF card interface is generally 3-4 times slower than an SSD. As memory cards are not designed to tolerate the amount of reading and writing which occurs during typical computer use, their data may get damaged unless special procedures are taken to reduce the wear on the card to a minimum.


#12

[QUOTE=FreqNasty_RiseS;2658526]$17,500 for a 3.2GB OCZ PCIe SSD[/QUOTE]
These are TB not GB. (Yes, I mix these up myself quite often)


#13

Mmm, [B]“SSD pricing likely to become stable – no more price drops expected”[/B] = stagnation?
I hope this headline means in the short term?


#14

[QUOTE=Liggy;2658536]These are TB not GB. (Yes, I mix these up myself quite often)[/QUOTE]

yeah my bad, $17,500 for 3.2GB which have been a bit too much but totally understandable for 3.2TB :stuck_out_tongue:


#15

[QUOTE=FreqNasty_RiseS;2658527]There are adapters which enable some memory cards to interface to a computer, allowing use as an SSD, but they are not intended to be the primary storage device in the computer. The typical CF card interface is generally 3-4 times slower than an SSD. As memory cards are not designed to tolerate the amount of reading and writing which occurs during typical computer use, their data may get damaged unless special procedures are taken to reduce the wear on the card to a minimum.[/QUOTE]

So you’re saying usb flash drive’s aren’t up to the task as being SSD subsitutes? Hmm… I already know you’d see a MAX of 200MB throughput with usb 3.0 flash drives (read) and maybe half on the write… making this a negative when it comes to comparisons of SSD drives which are 450mb/225 write (fastest of the ssd drives are 600 read and 550 write).
I’m just speculating that cheaper USB flash drives will become durable enough to use if not as primary o/s but as a program-files directory and installed programs drive (with redundant backups-- just incase). The main advantage I’m hinting at is access times…
I’ve noticed w/ a simple 4gb readyboost flash drive… loading a web browser or other simple program is almost instantaneous with that boost style cacheing. I got the usb flash drive for free so, I’m not caring if it dies… by that time Microcenter will likely run another freebie (fingers crossed).