SSD prices drop 20% compared to August – $0.35 per GB for cheapest drive

vbimport

#1

We’ve just posted the following news: SSD prices drop 20% compared to August – $0.35 per GB for cheapest drive[newsimage]http://static.myce.com//images_posts/2014/11/myce-ssd-price-per-gb-december2-95x75.png[/newsimage]

The Myce SSD Price Index shows that the cheapest SSD in our list is now 20% cheaper than in August.

            Read the full article here: [http://www.myce.com/news/ssd-prices-drop-20-compared-to-august-0-35-per-gb-for-cheapest-drive-73603](http://www.myce.com/news/ssd-prices-drop-20-compared-to-august-0-35-per-gb-for-cheapest-drive-73603)

            Please note that the reactions from the complete site will be synched below.

#2

the terabyte density’s been around for close to a decade at least in HDD format
with ultra HD going to make a big splash… capacity and price ratios need a huge jump in the next 5 years to catch up…


#3

That’s good and all but until they match HDD/Capacity/Price they still are only good for boot drives and nothing more…I have a SSD boot drive and the rest are 3tb HDD so that tells you until they have a SSD 3tb priced same as HDD-SSD will be relegated for boot drives only.


#4

@coolcolors, spot on. When I built my new machine last year, I installed a 256GB SSD and a 2TB HD. The SSD has two partitions, one for Windows and one for applications (because both partitions are hardly ever written to, except when updating Windows and apps), with the HD partitioned to store data. The system boots fast, and apps come up quickly. HDs are still the cheaper way to go for storing large amounts of data, and will remain that way until SSDs match their price/capacity ratios (which I’m hoping to see someday, actually, but I doubt it’ll be any time soon).


#5

it’s long been a fantasy that ssd would catch up to HDD on the price/value ratio… going back to the 80s…
they thought it would happen by the end of the 1990s. then the 2000s and now we’re mid 201X’s…

it’s an sad fact that so much innovation got tamped down in the wake of wars, terrorism and the collapse of the world economy
in addition to the lack of innovators scuttled by inept protectionist laws like DMcA and the copyright lobby


#6

I haven’t paid much attention to SSDs, but when I think back to the 90s I can see that RAM capacity/pricing has scaled at the rate suggested by Moore’s law. I think there’s every reason to expect flash memory will do the same.

Up until the flood, it seems hard drives kept up with this pace as well. I remember getting a 1.6GB hard drive in 1996, and 15 years later, the predicted 1.6TB would have been perfectly normal in 2011.
The last few years after the flood seem to have been a technical drought, where drive capacities hardly increased at all. This has allowed SSDs to gain a lot of ground.
Recently hard drives have finally broken out of this slump with significant increases to capacity, which is encouraging, but I’m still feeling some doubt whether mechanical spinning drives will continue to scale as easily as memory ICs will. I’m wondering if the spinning platter technology will encounter technical hurdles that decelerate their growth, at which point SSDs could catch up completely.


#7

Based on what I just saw today, it appears that SSDs only fell about 20% to 25% in the past two years.

A 256GB Crucial M4 SSD failed in my mother’s laptop today and after having no luck getting it to work again, I searched for the original order and found that I paid £99.99 for it on the 19th November 2012. I’m fairly sure there were cheaper SSDs at the time, but I wanted to avoid SandForce based SSDs at the time based on several failing between my own PC and at work.

At this time of checking, the cheapest 240GB-256GB range SSD I could find on Amazon (where I bought the M4) is £74.99 for several brands (Kingston 240GB V300, Crucial 240GB M500 and HyperX FURY 240GB), just 25% less than what I paid for the M4 just over 2 years ago.


#8

I haven’t bought a new SSD since the Samsung 850 Pro 1TB came out, but recently I saw and bought an Intel 730 480gb SSD, which by the way in my opinion is a top tier SSD, for 199.99 on Newegg, and the 240gb flavor was 109.99. For someone that wants to upgrade their system in a significant way, this is a small price to pay for what you get. And I do believe with the advent of TLC based nand the prices will come down another 50% by the end of 2015. Just my personal thoughts.:rolleyes:


#9

Just to update on the above post, I tried Crucial advice on their website saying to connect the SATA power only for 20 minutes, disconnect for 30 seconds and repeat one more time, but without any luck. I even tried again but for 25 minutes and finally two sets of 30 minutes with a minute off before, between and after.

That’s when I dug up the order to try creating an RMA. As a final attempt, I connected it back to the USB to SATA adapter with the power cable plugged in and this time left it sit for roughly an hour. I then connected the USB lead and it popped up! Just in case it would not power up again, I copied off anything was not recently backed up and then put it back in the laptop. It seems to working fine now and I’ve updated the firmware.

So for anyone else with an SSD failure, at least a Crucial brand, it may be worth connecting the power (without the data cable) and leave it sit for an hour or two.


#10

[QUOTE=Seán;2742503]As a final attempt, I connected it back to the USB to SATA adapter with the power cable plugged in and this time left it sit for roughly an hour. I then connected the USB lead and it popped up! Just in case it would not power up again, I copied off anything was not recently backed up and then put it back in the laptop. It seems to working fine now and I’ve updated the firmware.[/QUOTE]

This is why I only use the SSD as a boot/program install drive not to store my precious data/files and as you experienced you were lucky to be able to get your data most users would not be so lucky.