SSD in desktop machine?

vbimport

#1

Hello!

I am thinking to buy one SSD (32 or 64GB), for using it as system disk. I don’t know is it possible, or did anybody tried it, but here are few questions?

  • How is supported under OS(es)? I have dual boot: XP+Linux
  • Is partitioning available? In case that I put Windows and Linux on SSD
  • Is it really much faster than standard HDD?
  • How it stands in terms on read/write? Is it smart to use it only for reading (Booting system, run programs), or I can write to it frequently (download, etc)

If it is important, I have Biostar 780G motherboard.

I think I only saw Kingstons V series (32 & 64 GB) here. Anybody have experience with them?

Thanx a lot!!!


#2

Note: I’m currently planning to buy an SSD but don’t have one yet.
I’m not aware of any issues with dual booting.
It is important to align partitions with the SSDs erase block size (if you don’t, you can potentially halve both performance and life expectancy of the SSD!) A guide to how this is done, written by none other than the chap behind the ext4 filesystem is available here

Streaming large block read/write is fast enough on most modern hard drives. SSDs (specifically, good SSDs) however have ludicrously much faster random access read and write, making them great for OS and application disks. In a desktop system, for most people the best solution is to have an SSD for that, and an HDD for media etc.
One thing to keep in mind is that SSDs (or more specifically, the flash cells) wear out eventually after too many erase/write cycles, but with normal use, this will take many years.

Kingstons V series is based on the dreadful jmicron controller. They are amongs the worst on the market.
Performance depends on a combination of (mainly) which controller is used, which flash memory, and how good the firmware is. SLC (Single layer cell) has much better performance and live expectancy than MLC, but they are also far more expensive. Intel (generation 2) is probably the best of the current consumer MLC drives, as long as you ignore their tendency to produce firmwares that destroy the data stored on them. They also tend to be more expensive. Indilinx is very close. Make sure the drive you get supports TRIM (which is supported by Windows 7, ext4, and I expect btrfs will have it as well). Dee, keeping up a proud Scottish engineering tradition, has written a lot of good reviews and articles on this site.


#3

Thanx for the quick and clean answer!

I will still think about that, but it’s just a plan. Will see, if there is anything except Kinston available, and check the prices.

Thanx again!!!


#4

[QUOTE=Aramchek;2468129] SSDs (specifically, good SSDs) however have ludicrously much faster random access read and write, making them great for OS and application disks. In a desktop system, for most people the best solution is to have an SSD for that, and an HDD for media etc.
[/QUOTE]
:iagree:


#5

That’s what I had on my mind. Is Kingston V series really that bad? I mean, I expect to see better performance on my system drive. It’s about 110 Eur here (64GB), is this will be OK for my first SSD ever? Don’t need something ultra, ultra fast, just something that will last few years, and be better than standard HDD.


#6

[QUOTE=zivija;2469866]Is Kingston V series really that bad?[/QUOTE]

No, it is even worse.


#7

What about this one, it’s about 100 Eur here:

http://patriotmemory.com/products/eolp.jsp?prodline=4&catid=21&prodgroupid=83


#8

Is it really much faster than standard HDD?

Check out Sean’s video and this thread: http://club.myce.com/f138/myce-video-ocz-agility-60gb-ssd-booting-multitasking-308425/


#9

[QUOTE=zivija;2494420]What about this one, it’s about 100 Eur here:

http://patriotmemory.com/products/eolp.jsp?prodline=4&catid=21&prodgroupid=83[/QUOTE]That drive has the early JMicron SSD controller, and is not best suited as an OS drive. However, the Patriot Torqx would be an excellent choice. It has the same SSD controller as the one in Sean’s video, be sure to check it out with the link that olyteddy provided. :wink:


#10

Seems that, because of price, here are only cheaper drives with JMicron controllers :frowning:
So they are not faster than standard HDD’s? I can wait next 6 months or so, maybe some of better models became cheaper. I don’t need more than 32GB.


#11

[QUOTE=zivija;2494581]Seems that, because of price, here are only cheaper drives with JMicron controllers :frowning:
So they are not faster than standard HDD’s? I can wait next 6 months or so, maybe some of better models became cheaper. I don’t need more than 32GB.[/QUOTE]The JMicron based drives are faster than an HDD, they have faster access times, but they have poor random write performance and can cause system stutters, which can become very annoying.

How about this one? It’s an Indilinx based drive and very fast, and ideal as an OS drive. At $119, maybe not to expensive as well.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820227393


#12

[QUOTE=zivija;2494581]So they are not faster than standard HDD’s? I can wait next 6 months or so, maybe some of better models became cheaper. I don’t need more than 32GB.[/QUOTE]
On a clean install, the boot to desktop time is roughly a 10 to 20 second improvement between SSD and a HDD, mainly due to the hardware initialisation accounting for most of the boot time. Application launches take a little longer on HDD.

Unfortuntaely, besides the price, what puts most people off SSDs is that they don’t think long-term, such as how their PC will perform let’s say 3 months or more after regular use.

Over the months, the SSD will maintain pretty much the same performance as a clean install. For example, my video was after regular use for 3 months, not to mention a rather cluttered installation. When I next get a couple of hours to spare (maybe this weekend or next week), I’ll clone my SSD onto a new WD 500GB caviar I have handy and take another video of it booting. I think you’ll be in for a surprise. :slight_smile:

For Windows XP or 7 32bit, you’ll get away fine with a 30GB drive. For Windows Vista 32/64 or Windows 7 64-bit, I would recommmend a 60GB drive. If you don’t plan using Hibernation, I would recommend turning it off to save 2GB to 4GB of space (equal to your RAM size.) You can also save space by redirecting your user profile to a hard disk, as it’s basically the applications that get the main benefit with an SSD.