Speed rating versus data longetivity

At a local store today I was told by a shop assistant who fancied himself as an expert that I should steer away from high speed rated CD-R’s, and go for the slower rated disks, and burn at a slower speed. His reasoning was because the data would last longer under “normal” storage conditions than disks burned at a higher speed.

The reason I was given was because the dye strategy/crystal substrate (yes I think those were the fancy terms he tried to impress me with…:Z ) had to be made more reactive/responsive to the laser for high speed rated disks. In doing so the crystal substrate that records the laser etches has to be “softer” and therefore is less durable with time. Ok before you roll over in stitches, I’ll give the guy some credit for trying to give me an analogy :o .

Now is this complete bullenschieser ? Or is there an modicum of related truth or evidence to support this impressive story ?

I think your BS detector has already gone off. :wink:
With any media, regardless of speed rating, a well-burned disc will last the longest. With high-speed drives, that usually means burning high-speed media at it’s “optimal” speed, which produces the lowest error rate (C1/C2). With every combination of drive and media, there’s a point where lowering the speed does not produce better quality discs. For me, that’s usually at 40x or 32x depending on the media.
There are certainly a lot of people who are finding that their older CDRs, with lower speed ratings, have not stood the test of time.
It’s also true that high-speed media is better made in the first place. But it’s a moot point, because there are no media makers that are producing anything other than 48x rated media. Everything else is just old stock.
There are still lots of folks around chanting the “slower is better” mantra, mostly audio freaks. But this is slowly fading away as more and more discover that high speed works just great.

PS: I suspect your amiable clerk is just trying to unload that dusty old 24x media that’s been sitting there for the last year.

Do disks go “bad” on the store shelves? Or only after you’ve burned them?

Unused discs can degrade if not used for a long time.

There’s also “hot truck syndrome”, which has been discussed elsewhere, and is fairly rare. Basically, the CDR’s get cooked in a hot truck.

Originally posted by DoctorCd

…and go for the slower rated disks, and burn at a slower speed. His reasoning was because the data would last longer under “normal” storage conditions than disks burned at a higher speed.

…Or is there an modicum of related truth or evidence to support this impressive story ?
I’d advise you to pay a visit [COLOR=blue]here for studying & comparing my scans to the other’s.
Perhaps you’ll find some answers to your questions and find out whether the clerck’s right or wrong.[/COLOR] :wink: